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1939 Major League Baseball season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1939 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 17 – October 8, 1939
Number of games154
Number of teams16
Regular season
Season MVPAL: Joe DiMaggio (NYY)
NL: Bucky Walters (CIN)
AL championsNew York Yankees
  AL runners-upBoston Red Sox
NL championsCincinnati Reds
  NL runners-upSt. Louis Cardinals
World Series
ChampionsNew York Yankees
  Runners-upCincinnati Reds
 MLB seasons

The 1939 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 17 to October 8, 1939. The Cincinnati Reds and New York Yankees were the regular season champions of the National League and American League, respectively. The Yankees then defeated the Reds in the World Series, four games to none. The Yankees became the first team to win the World Series four years in a row.

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Joe DiMaggio NYY .381 Johnny Mize SLC .349
HR Jimmie Foxx BSR 35 Johnny Mize SLC 28
RBI Ted Williams BSR 145 Frank McCormick CIN 128
Wins Bob Feller CLE 24 Bucky Walters CIN 27
ERA Lefty Grove BSR 2.54 Bucky Walters CIN 2.29
SO Bob Feller CLE 246 Claude Passeau PHP/CHC
Bucky Walters CIN
137
SV Johnny Murphy NYY 19 Bob Bowman SLC
Clyde Shoun SLC
9
SB George Case WSH 51 Stan Hack CHC
Lee Handley PIT
17

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  World Series
       
  AL New York Yankees 4
  NL Cincinnati Reds 0

Managers

American League

Team Manager Comments
Boston Red Sox Joe Cronin
Chicago White Sox Jimmy Dykes
Cleveland Indians Ossie Vitt
Detroit Tigers Del Baker
New York Yankees Joe McCarthy
Philadelphia Athletics Connie Mack
St. Louis Browns Fred Haney
Washington Senators Bucky Harris

National League

Team Manager Comments
Boston Braves Casey Stengel
Brooklyn Dodgers Leo Durocher
Chicago Cubs Gabby Hartnett
Cincinnati Reds Bill McKechnie
New York Giants Bill Terry
Philadelphia Phillies Doc Prothro
Pittsburgh Pirates Pie Traynor
St. Louis Cardinals Ray Blades

Home Field Attendance

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game
Cincinnati Reds[1] 97 18.3% 981,443 38.9% 12,117
Brooklyn Dodgers[2] 84 21.7% 955,668 44.1% 12,252
New York Yankees[3] 106 7.1% 859,785 -11.4% 11,166
Detroit Tigers[4] 81 -3.6% 836,279 4.6% 10,722
Chicago Cubs[5] 84 -5.6% 726,663 -23.6% 9,083
New York Giants[6] 77 -7.2% 702,457 -12.2% 9,493
Chicago White Sox[7] 85 30.8% 594,104 75.6% 7,716
Boston Red Sox[8] 89 1.1% 573,070 -11.4% 7,641
Cleveland Indians[9] 87 1.2% 563,926 -13.5% 7,324
St. Louis Cardinals[10] 92 29.6% 400,245 37.3% 5,066
Philadelphia Athletics[11] 55 3.8% 395,022 2.5% 5,198
Pittsburgh Pirates[12] 68 -20.9% 376,734 -41.2% 4,893
Washington Senators[13] 65 -13.3% 339,257 -35.1% 4,406
Boston Bees[14] 63 -18.2% 285,994 -16.2% 3,918
Philadelphia Phillies[15] 45 0.0% 277,973 67.3% 3,756
St. Louis Browns[16] 43 -21.8% 109,159 -16.3% 1,399

Events

Deaths

  • January 13 – Jacob Ruppert, 71, Yankees owner since 1914
  • January 19 – Cliff Heathcote, 40, NL outfielder who batted .275 over 15 seasons
  • January 25 – Abner Dalrymple, 81, star outfielder of the 1880s, leadoff hitter for five Chicago pennant winners
  • March 8 – Scott Stratton, 69, pitcher, primarily with Louisville, who posted a 34-win season in 1890 which included 15 straight victories
  • March 28 – Fred Goldsmith, 82, pitcher who steadfastly maintained that he had first thrown the curveball in 1870, six years earlier than Candy Cummings, who gained credit for the development
  • May 24 – Barney Pelty, 58, pitcher for the St. Louis Browns and one of the first Jewish players in the AL
  • June 17 – Allen Sothoron, 46, spitball pitcher who spent most of his career with the St. Louis Browns and Cardinals
  • July 7 – Deacon White, 91, star bare-handed catcher and third baseman for six championship teams in the 1870s and 1880s, and the fourth player to collect 1000 hits
  • September 25 – Frank LaPorte, 59, infielder who batted .300 three times and led the Federal League in RBIs in 1914
  • December 3 – Frank Killen, 69, winner of 164 games from 1891–1900, including two 30-win seasons
  • December 18 – Heywood Broun, 51, sportswriter and editor in New York City since the early 1910s
  • December 26 – Clyde Engle, 55, utility player who scored the tying run for Boston in the 10th inning of Game 8 of the 1912 World Series, after his earlier pop fly had been dropped

References

  1. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "Brief Record". goldenrankings.com. Retrieved November 29, 2014.
  18. ^ Pellowski, Michael J (2007). The Little Giant Book of Baseball Facts. United States: Sterling Publishing Co. pp. 352. ISBN 9781402742736.

External links

This page was last edited on 9 October 2020, at 06:57
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