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1938 United States Senate elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1938 United States Senate elections

← 1936 November 8, 1938 1940 →

32 of the 96 seats in the United States Senate
49 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
 
AlbenBarkley.jpg
Charles mcnary.jpg
Leader Alben Barkley Charles McNary
Party Democratic Republican
Leader since July 22, 1937 March 4, 1933
Leader's seat Kentucky Oregon
Seats before 75 17
Seats after 68 23
Seat change Decrease 7 Increase 7
Seats up 29 3
Races won 22 10

  Third party Fourth party
 
Party Farmer–Labor Progressive
Seats before 2 1
Seats after 2 1
Seat change Steady Steady
Seats up 0 0
Races won 0 0

  Fifth party
 
Party Independent
Seats before 1
Seats after 1
Seat change Steady
Seats up 0
Races won 0

US 1938 senate election map.svg
Results including special elections
     Democratic gain      Democratic hold
     Republican gain      Republican hold

Majority Leader before election

Alben Barkley
Democratic

Elected Majority Leader

Alben Barkley
Democratic

The United States Senate elections of 1938 occurred in the middle of Franklin D. Roosevelt's second term. This occurred six years after the Democratic landslide in the 1932 election, and so the opposition Republicans gained seven seats from the Democrats. However, the Democrats retained a commanding lead over the Republicans with more than two-thirds of the chamber.

Background

A contemporary account [1] cited a number of reasons for the losses suffered by the Democrats. The first was the Recession of 1937, which had continued into the first half of 1938, and which had arguably weakened public confidence in the administration's New Deal economic policies. Controversy over the Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937 (Roosevelt's "court-packing" plan) was also a major factor. There were, in addition, strains between the more liberal New Deal supporters and the conservative wing of the Democratic party centered in the Southern states. These strains were exacerbated by an effort led by President Roosevelt to target certain conservative senators for defeat in Democratic primaries, including Walter George of Georgia, Millard Tydings of Maryland and Ellison Smith of South Carolina, along with the chairman of the House Rules Committee, John J. O'Connor of New York. While a number of New Deal supporters won primary elections, such as Sen. Alben Barkley in Kentucky, who defeated future baseball commissioner Happy Chandler, Sen. James P. Pope of Idaho, a prominent New Deal supporter, lost his bid for re-nomination, as did California senator William McAdoo, though McAdoo's Democratic opponent Sheridan Downey had campaigned as a liberal New Dealer who would also do more to improve pension plans.[2]

Given the high levels of Democratic success in the 1930, 1932, 1934 and 1936 elections, the Democrats were in a difficult position in defending a large number of seats, even without these pressures. This was the first of five consecutive elections where the GOP made gains in the Senate.

Gains and losses

Overall, the Democrats lost 7 seats to Republicans

  1. Augustine Lonergan (D-CT)
  2. George McGill (D-KS), the last Democrat ever elected to the Senate from Kansas as of 2020
  3. Fred H. Brown (D-NH)
  4. John Gerald Milton (D-NJ) had been appointed to replace A. Harry Moore (D), who resigned. Milton did not run in the special election to finish the current term (ending in 1941).
  5. Robert J. Bulkley (D-OH)
  6. Herbert Hitchcock (D-SD) had been appointed to replace Peter Norbeck (R), who died. Hitchcock lost the Democratic primary both to finish the current term (ending in 1939) and for the new term (ending in 1945).
  7. F. Ryan Duffy (D-WI)

Change in composition

Before the general elections

  D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8
D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11 D10 D9
D19 D20 D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28
D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31 D30 D29
D39 D40 D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 D46 D47 D48
Majority → D49
Ala.
Ran
D58
Ind.
Ran
D57
Idaho
Ran
D56
Ga.
Ran
D55
Fla.
Ran
D54
Conn.
Ran
D53
Colo.
Ran
D52
Calif.
Ran
D51
Ark.
Ran
D50
Ariz.
Ran
D59
Iowa
Ran
D60
Kan.
Ran
D61
Ky.
Ran
D62
La.
Ran
D63
Md.
Ran
D64
Mo.
Ran
D65
Nev.
Ran
D66
N.H.
Ran
D67
N.Y.
Ran
D68
N.C.
Ran
FL2 D77
Ore.
Retired
D76
Ill.
Retired
D75
Wisc.
Ran
D74
Wash.
Ran
D73
Utah
Ran
D72
S.D.
Ran
D71
S.C.
Ran
D70
Okla.
Ran
D69
Ohio
Ran
FL1 I1 P1 R15
Vt.
Ran
R14
Pa.
Ran
R13
N.D.
Ran
R12 R11 R10 R9
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8

General election results

  D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8
D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11 D10 D9
D19 D20 D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28
D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31 D30 D29
D39 D40 D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 D46 D47 D48
Majority → D49
Ala.
Re-elected
D58
La.
Re-elected
D57
Md.
Re-elected
D56
Iowa
Re-elected
D55
Ind.
Re-elected
D54
Ga.
Re-elected
D53
Fla.
Re-elected
D52
Colo.
Re-elected
D51
Ark.
Re-elected
D50
Ariz.
Re-elected
D59
Ky.
Re-elected
D60
Mo.
Re-elected
D61
Nev.
Re-elected
D62
N.Y.
Re-elected
D63
N.C.
Re-elected
D64
Okla.
Re-elected
D65
S.C.
Re-elected
D66
Utah
Re-elected
D67
Wash.
Re-elected
D68
Calif.
Hold
R19
Ohio
Gain
R20
N.H.
Gain
R21
Kan.
Gain
R22
Conn.
Gain
P1 I1 FL1 FL2 D70
Ill.
Hold
D69
Idaho
Hold
R18
Ore.
Gain
R17
S.D.
Gain
R16
Wisc.
Gain
R15
Vt.
Re-elected
R14
Pa.
Re-elected
R13
N.D.
Re-elected
R12 R11 R10 R9
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8

Special election results

  D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6
N.Y.
Hold
D7
Tenn.
Hold
D8
Ala.
Appointee elected
D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11 D10 D9
D19 D20 D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28
D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31 D30 D29
D39 D40 D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 D46 D47 D48
Majority → D49
D58 D57 D56 D55 D54 D53 D52 D51 D50
D59 D60 D61 D62 D63 D64 D65 D66 D67 D68
R19 R20 R21 R22 R23
N.J.
Gain
P1 I1 FL1 FL2 D69
R18
Ore.
Gain, same as general
R17
S.D.
Gain, same as general
R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11 R10 R9
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8
Key:
D# Democratic
FL# Farmer–Labor
P# Progressive
R# Republican
I# Independent
V# Vacant

Race summaries

Special elections during the 75th Congress

In these special elections, the winner was seated during 1938 or before January 3, 1939; ordered by election date.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Alabama
(Class 2)
J. Lister Hill Democratic 1938 (Appointed) Interim appointee elected April 26, 1938.
New Jersey
(Class 1)
John G. Milton Democratic 1938 (Appointed) Interim appointee retired.
Winner elected November 8, 1938.
Republican gain.
New York
(Class 1)
Royal S. Copeland Democratic 1922
1928
1934
Incumbent died June 17, 1938.
Winner elected November 8, 1938.
Democratic hold.
Oregon
(Class 3)
Alfred E. Reames Democratic 1938 (Appointed) Interim appointee retired.
Winner elected November 8, 1938.
Republican gain.
Winner also elected to next term, see below.
South Dakota
(Class 3)
Herbert E. Hitchcock Democratic 1936 (Appointed) Interim appointee lost nomination to finish the term.
Winner elected November 8, 1938.
Republican gain.
Winner did not run for the next term, however, see below.
  • Green tickY Gladys Pyle (Republican) 58.1%
  • John T. McCullen (Democratic) 41.9%
Tennessee
(Class 1)
George L. Berry Democratic 1937 (Appointed) Interim appointee lost nomination to finish the term.
Winner elected November 8, 1938.
Democratic hold.

Races leading to the 76th Congress

In these general elections, the winners were elected for the term beginning January 3, 1939; ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 3 seats.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral
history
Alabama J. Lister Hill Democratic 1938 (Appointed)
1938 (Special)
Incumbent re-elected.
Arizona Carl Hayden Democratic 1926
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Carl Hayden (Democratic) 76.5%
  • B. H. Clingan (Republican) 23.5%
Arkansas Hattie W. Caraway Democratic 1931 (Appointed)
1932 (Special)
Incumbent re-elected.
California William G. McAdoo Democratic 1932 Incumbent lost renomination.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
Incumbent then resigned and Thomas M. Storke (D) was appointed to finish the term.
  • Green tickY Sheridan Downey (Democratic) 54.4%
  • Philip Bancroft (Republican) 44.7%
  • Lillain Symes Clements (Socialist) 0.9%
Colorado Alva B. Adams Democratic 1923 (Appointed)
1924 (Retired)
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
Connecticut Augustine Lonergan Democratic 1932 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Florida Claude Pepper Democratic 1936 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia Walter F. George Democratic 1922 (Special)
1926
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
Idaho James P. Pope Democratic 1932 Incumbent lost renomination.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
Illinois William H. Dieterich Democratic 1932 Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
Indiana Frederick Van Nuys Democratic 1932 Incumbent re-elected.
Iowa Guy M. Gillette Democratic 1936 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Kansas George McGill Democratic 1930 (Special)
1932
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Kentucky Alben W. Barkley Democratic 1926
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
Louisiana John H. Overton Democratic 1932 Incumbent re-elected.
Maryland Millard E. Tydings Democratic 1926
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
Missouri Bennett Champ Clark Democratic 1932
1933 (Appointed)
Incumbent re-elected.
Nevada Patrick A. McCarran Democratic 1932 Incumbent re-elected.
New Hampshire Fred H. Brown Democratic 1932 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
New York Robert F. Wagner Democratic 1926
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
North Carolina Robert R. Reynolds Democratic 1932 (Special)
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
North Dakota Gerald P. Nye Republican 1925 (Appointed)
1926 (Special)
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
Ohio Robert J. Bulkley Democratic 1930 (Special)
1932
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Oklahoma Elmer Thomas Democratic 1926
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Elmer Thomas (Democratic) 65.4%
  • Harry G. Glasser (Republican) 33.9%
Oregon Alfred E. Reames Democratic 1938 (Appointed) Interim appointee retired.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Winner also elected to finish term, see above.
Pennsylvania James J. Davis Republican 1930 (Special)
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
South Carolina Ellison D. Smith Democratic 1909
1914
1920
1926
1932
Incumbent re-elected.
South Dakota Herbert E. Hitchcock Democratic 1936 (Appointed) Interim appointee lost nomination to next term.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Utah Elbert D. Thomas Democratic 1932 Incumbent re-elected.
Vermont Ernest W. Gibson Republican 1933 (Appointed)
1934 (Special)
Incumbent re-elected.
Washington Homer T. Bone Democratic 1932 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Homer T. Bone (Democratic) 62.6%
  • Ewing D. Colvin (Republican) 37.1%
  • Eugene Solie (Socialist Labor) 0.3%
Wisconsin F. Ryan Duffy Democratic 1932 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.

Alabama

Alabama election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic J. Lister Hill (Incumbent) 113,413 86.38%
Republican J. M. Pennington 17,885 13.62%
None Scattering 1 0.00%
Majority 95,528 72.76%
Turnout 131,299
Democratic hold

Arizona

Arizona election

← 1932
1944 →
 
Carl Hayden.jpg
No image.png
Nominee Carl Hayden Burt H. Clingan
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 82,714 25,378
Percentage 76.52% 23.48%

U.S. Senator before election

Carl Hayden
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Carl Hayden
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Carl Hayden ran for re-election to a third term, defeating Republican nominee Burt H. Clingan, chairman of the Arizona Industrial Commission, in the general election.

In contrast to previous elections, Hayden was easily reelected, receiving only token opposition from a relatively unknown Republican challenger.

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carl T. Hayden (Incumbent) 68,328 65.48%
Democratic Robert E. Miller 22,154 21.23%
Democratic Whit I. Hughes 13,867 13.29%
Total votes 104,349 100.00
Arizona election[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Carl T. Hayden (Incumbent) 82,714 76.52%
Republican Burt H. Clingan 25,378 23.48%
Majority 57,336 53.04%
Turnout 108,092
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

Arkansas

Arkansas election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hattie Wyatt Caraway (Incumbent) 122,883 89.58%
Republican C. T. Atkinson 14,290 10.42%
Majority 108,593 79.16%
Turnout 137,173
Democratic hold

California

California election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheridan Downey 1,372,314 54.41%
Republican Philip Bancroft 1,126,240 44.65%
Socialist Lillian Symes Clements 22,569 0.89%
None Scattering 1,019 0.04%
Majority 246,074 9.76%
Turnout 2,522,142
Democratic hold

Colorado

Colorado election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alva B. Adams (Incumbent) 262,786 58.24%
Republican Archibald A. Lee 181,297 40.18%
Socialist Carle Whitehead 3,604 0.80%
Independent Progressive James Allander 3,522 0.78%
Majority 81,489 18.06%
Turnout 451,209
Democratic hold

Connecticut

Connecticut election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John A. Danaher 270,413 42.89%
Democratic Augustine Lonergan (Incumbent) 252,426 40.04%
Socialist Bellani Trombley 99,282 15.75%
Socialist Labor Joseph Mackey 6,931 1.10%
American Labor Philip Brainard 766 0.12%
Communist Michael A. Russo 615 0.10%
Majority 17,987 2.85%
Turnout 630,433
Republican gain from Democratic

Florida

Florida election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Claude Pepper (Incumbent) 145,757 82.45%
Republican Thomas E. Swanson 31,035 17.55%
Majority 114,722 64.90%
Turnout 176,792
Democratic hold

Georgia

Georgia election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Walter F. George (Incumbent) 66,987 95.09%
Independent Charles A. Jiles 3,442 4.89%
Republican Eugene Talmadge 14 0.02%
Majority 63,545 90.20%
Turnout 70,443
Democratic hold

Idaho

Idaho election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Worth Clark 99,801 54.66%
Republican Donald A. Callahan 81,939 44.88%
Progressive V. A. Verhei 845 0.46%
Majority 17,862 9.78%
Turnout 182,585
Democratic hold

Illinois

Illinois election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Scott W. Lucas 1,638,162 51.32%
Republican Richard J. Lyons 1,542,574 48.33%
Prohibition Enoch A. Holtwick 10,707 0.34%
None Scattering 569 0.02%
Majority 95,588 2.99%
Turnout 3,192,012
Democratic hold

Indiana

Indiana election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frederick Van Nuys (Incumbent) 788,386 49.85%
Republican Raymond E. Willis 783,189 49.52%
Prohibition Herman L. Seeger 6,905 0.44%
Socialist Louis E. Roebuck 2,026 0.13%
Communist Miles Blansett 984 0.06%
Majority 5,197 0.33%
Turnout 1,581,490
Democratic hold

Iowa

Iowa election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Guy Gillette (Incumbent) 413,788 49.74%
Republican Lester J. Dickinson 410,983 49.41%
Farmer–Labor George F. Buresch 4,723 0.57%
Progressive Raymond E. Hanke 1,525 0.18%
Prohibition G. W. Bauseman 820 0.10%
Majority 2,805 0.33%
Turnout 831,839
Democratic hold

Kansas

Kansas election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Clyde M. Reed 419,532 56.21%
Democratic George McGill (Incumbent) 326,774 43.78%
None Joe Corpstein 99 0.01%
Majority 92,758 12.43%
Turnout 746,405
Republican gain from Democratic

Kentucky

Kentucky election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alben W. Barkley (Incumbent) 346,735 62.03%
Republican John P. Haswell 212,266 37.97%
Democratic Happy Chandler (write-in) 20 0.00%
Majority 134,469 22.06%
Turnout 559,021
Democratic hold

Louisiana

Louisiana election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John H. Overton (Incumbent) 151,582 99.84%
Independent Maurice E. Clark 250 0.16%
Majority 151,332 99.68%
Turnout 151,832
Democratic hold

Maryland

Maryland election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Millard Tydings (Incumbent) 357,245 68.28%
Republican Oscar Lesser 153,253 29.29%
Union George W. Hunt 5,784 1.11%
Socialist Elisabeth Gilman 3,311 0.63%
American Labor Frank N. H. Lang 2,330 0.45%
Communist Harry Straw 1,301 0.25%
Majority 203,992 38.99%
Turnout 523,238
Democratic hold

Missouri

Missouri election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bennett Champ Clark (Incumbent) 757,587 60.69%
Republican Harry S. Caulfield 488,687 39.15%
Socialist J. G. Hodges 1,712 0.14%
Socialist Labor Karl L. Oberhue 292 0.02%
Majority 268,900 21.54%
Turnout 1,248,278
Democratic hold

Nevada

Nevada election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pat McCarran (Incumbent) 27,406 58.96%
Republican Tasker Oddie 19,078 41.04%
Majority 8,328 17.92%
Turnout 46,484
Democratic hold

New Hampshire

New Hampshire election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charles W. Tobey 100,633 54.23%
Democratic Fred H. Brown (Incumbent) 84,920 45.77%
Majority 15,713 8.46%
Turnout 185,553
Republican gain from Democratic

New Jersey (Special)

New Jersey special election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William Warren Barbour 816,667 52.98%
Democratic William H. J. Ely 704,159 45.68%
Prohibition Louis H. Kelley 8,201 0.53%
Socialist John Palangio 3,671 0.24%
Townsend Pension-Labor Fred Turner 3,521 0.23%
Communist William Norman 3,515 0.23%
Socialist Labor John C. Butterworth 1,873 0.12%
Majority 112,508 7.30%
Turnout 1,541,607
Republican gain from Democratic

New York

New York Republicans nominated John Lord O'Brian for the U.S. Senate.[6] Democrats re-nominated the incumbent Wagner.[7] The American Labor party endorsed Wagner.[8]

Office Democratic ticket Republican ticket American Labor ticket Socialist ticket Independent Progressive ticket Industrial Government ticket
U.S. Senator, full term Robert F. Wagner 2,497,029 John Lord O'Brian 2,058,615 Robert F. Wagner Herman J. Hahn[b] 23,553 John Lord O'Brian O. Martin Olson[c] 3,851

New York (Special)

New York Republicans nominated Edward Corsi for the short Senate term.[6] Democrats nominated James M. Mead.[7] The American Labor party endorsed Mead.[8]

Office Democratic ticket Republican ticket American Labor ticket Socialist ticket Independent Progressive ticket
U.S. Senator, short term[d] James M. Mead 2,438,904 Edward F. Corsi 2,083,666 James M. Mead Harry W. Laidler 27,161 Edward F. Corsi

North Carolina

North Carolina election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Robert Rice Reynolds (Incumbent) 316,685 63.80%
Republican Charles A. Jonas 179,650 36.20%
Majority 137,035 27.60%
Turnout 496,335
Democratic hold

North Dakota

North Dakota election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Gerald Nye (Incumbent) 131,907 50.12%
Independent William Langer 112,007 42.56%
Democratic J. J. Nygard 19,244 7.31%
Majority 19,900 7.56%
Turnout 263,158
Republican hold

Ohio

Ohio election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert A. Taft 1,255,414 53.62%
Democratic Robert J. Bulkley (Incumbent) 1,085,792 46.38%
Majority 169,622 7.24%
Turnout 2,341,206
Republican gain from Democratic

Oklahoma

Oklahoma election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Elmer Thomas (Incumbent) 307,936 65.37%
Republican Harry G. Glasser 159,734 33.91%
Prohibition P. C. Nelson 2,220 0.47%
Independent Raymond B. Clark 603 0.13%
Independent Herndon J. Thompson 573 0.12%
Majority 148,202 31.46%
Turnout 471,066
Democratic hold

Oregon (Special)

Oregon special election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alexander G. Barry 180,815 54.20%
Democratic Robert A. Miller 152,773 45.80%
None Scattering 3 0.00%
Majority 28,042 8.40%
Turnout 333,591
Republican gain from Democratic

Oregon

Oregon election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rufus C. Holman 203,120 54.86%
Democratic Willis Mahoney 167,135 45.14%
None Scattering 6 0.00%
Majority 35,985 9.72%
Turnout 370,261
Republican gain from Democratic

Pennsylvania

General election results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James J. Davis (incumbent) 2,086,931 54.70%
Democratic George H. Earle 1,694,367 44.41%
Socialist David H. H. Felix 20,155 0.53%
Prohibition Forest S. Van Valin 9,327 0.24%
Pathfinders Reginald B. Naugle 2,508 0.07%
Communist Pat Toohey 1,530 0.04%
None Scattering 104 0.00%
Majority 392,564 10.29%
Turnout 3,814,922
Republican hold

South Carolina

South Carolina election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ellison D. Smith (Incumbent) 45,351 98.89%
Republican J. D. E. Meyer 508 1.11%
None Scattering 2 0.00%
Majority 44,843 97.78%
Turnout 45,861
Democratic hold

South Dakota (Special)

South Dakota election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Gladys Pyle 155,292 58.06%
Democratic John T. McCullen 112,177 41.94%
Majority 43,115 16.12%
Turnout 267,469
Republican gain from Democratic

South Dakota

South Dakota election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Chandler Gurney 146,813 52.46%
Democratic Tom Berry 133,064 47.54%
Majority 13,749 4.92%
Turnout 279,877
Republican gain from Democratic

Tennessee (Special)

Tennessee special election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom Stewart 194,028 70.50%
Republican Harley G. Fowler 72,098 26.20%
Independent John Randolph Neal, Jr. 9,106 3.31%
Majority 21,930 44.30%
Turnout 275,232
Democratic hold

Utah

Utah election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Elbert D. Thomas (Incumbent) 102,353 55.80%
Republican Franklin S. Harris 81,071 44.20%
Majority 21,282 11.60%
Turnout 183,424
Democratic hold

Vermont

Vermont election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ernest Willard Gibson (Incumbent) 73,990 65.58%
Democratic John McGrath 38,673 34.28%
None Scattering 161 0.14%
Majority 35,317 31.30%
Turnout 112,824
Republican hold

Washington

Washington election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Homer Bone (Incumbent) 371,535 62.62%
Republican Ewing D. Colvin 220,204 37.12%
Socialist Labor Eugene Solie 1,553 0.26%
Majority 151,331 25.50%
Turnout 593,292
Democratic hold

Wisconsin

Wisconsin election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alexander Wiley 416,770 45.92%
Progressive Herman Ekern 249,209 27.46%
Democratic F. Ryan Duffy 231,976 25.56%
Independent Townsend Republican John B. Chapple 7,251 0.80%
Communist Fred Basset Blair 1,283 0.14%
Independent Socialist Labor Joseph Erhardt 1,014 0.11%
None Scattering 31 0.00%
Majority 167,561 18.46%
Turnout 907,534
Republican gain from Progressive

Further reading

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Won special election in November 1938, but remained district attorney general until January 16, 1939, after the next Congress began.
  2. ^ Rev. Herman J. Hahn, of Buffalo, ran also for Lieutenant Governor in 1928 and 1936.
  3. ^ O. Martin Olson, of Jamestown, ran also for Comptroller in 1934
  4. ^ to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Royal S. Copeland

References

  1. ^ 1939 Britannica Book of the Year, "Democratic Party", pages 205-6
  2. ^ LIFE. Time Inc. 1994. p. 13. ISSN 0024-3019. Retrieved October 5, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1938" (PDF). Clerk.house.gov. Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  4. ^ "Our Campaigns - AZ US Senate - D Primary Race - Sep 13, 1938". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 16, 2019.
  5. ^ "Our Campaigns - AZ US Senate Race - Nov 08, 1938". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 15, 2019.
  6. ^ a b Hagerty, James A. (September 30, 1938). "DEWEY NOMINATED BY REPUBLICANS; ATTACKES TAMMANY; CHOICE BY ACCLAMATION Dewey Defends Decision to Run Points to Prosecuting Staff HAILED IN OVATION Prosecutor Promises to Rid State of 'Corruption' in 'Bigger Job' O'Brian and Corsi Nominated for Senate--A. V. McDermott for Attorney General DEWEY NOMINATED BY REPUBLICANS Republican Mayor Gets Bid to Inauguration Delay in Completing Ticket Criticizes Farm Legislation Politics the Biggest Racket". The New York Times. Retrieved July 15, 2019.
  7. ^ a b Times, Warren Moscowspecial To the New York (October 1, 1938). "LEHMAN IS DRAFTED FOR FOURTH TERM; HE ATTACKS DEWEY; POLETTI ON TICKET Yielding to Pleas to Run, Governor Insists on Justice as Aide CALLS RIVAL UNQUALIFIED Rochester Platform Hits Republican's Crime Issue--Wagner, Mead Are Nominated Calls Dewey Inexperienced Dewey Crime Speech a Factor LEHMAN DRAFTED FOR FOURTH TERM Platform Strong for New Deal La Guardia a Meed Champion Farley Predicts a Big Victory Hailed as". The New York Times. Retrieved July 16, 2019.
  8. ^ a b Hagerty, James A. (October 4, 1938). "LABORITES NAME LEHMAN WAGNER; ADOPT PLATFORM; OVATION FOR BOTH Governor, Accepting, Stresses Policy of Law Enforcement POLETTI ALSO NOMINATED Endorsement Efforts Fall Wagner Cites Record La Guardia is Acclaimed as He Urges Candidates Friendly to Roosevelt LABORITIES NAME LEHMAN, WAGNER Yields to Dubinsky Lehman Is Acclaimed Hillman Offers Wagner's Name Vladeck in Seconding Speech". The New York Times. Retrieved July 16, 2019.
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