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1930 in the United States

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Events from the year 1930 in the United States.

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  • ✪ History Brief: Daily Life in the 1930s
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Transcription

Every family was different in the 1930s, but there were some things that many of them had in common. What was day to day life like in the 1930s? What did families do? A typical family during the Great Depression would have consisted of a father, mother, and several children. The average day would commence with the father of the family leaving for work. That is, of course, if he was lucky enough to still be employed. Shortly after he had left, the children would leave for school. Most children walked to school or rode the school bus. The mother of the family usually did laundry on Monday mornings. Some families had new, labor-saving washing machines, but washing clothes by hand was still common. The clothes were hung out to dry on a clothes line. Tuesday was ironing day. Some families had electric irons, but many women still used a heavy, black flat-iron that was heated on the stove. The most common form of entertainment was the radio. Radio programs would entertain families throughout the day with various kinds of programming. During the day, soap operas would interest mothers while they worked in the home. After school, action and adventure programs for kids were common. In the evening, programs that the entire family might enjoy would take over the airwaves. If the family didn't want to listen to the radio, they might choose to play a board game, which were becoming popular in the '30s. Sorry! was released by Parker Brothers in 1934 and still remains popular today. By far, the most successful board game was Monopoly. This game gave people the chance to buy and sell property with money they could only dream of having. On Saturday evening, it was common for a family to go shopping, if they had the money to do so. There were a variety of stores downtown, from shoe stores, to clothing, sporting goods, and music shops. Most families didn't have a lot of money to spend at these stores. The average take home pay was about $17 a week. Some made as little as $7 a week. Doctors made about $60 a week. The prices of products reflected the economic conditions. A men's shirt cost about $1. A washing machine could be purchased for about $33. A winter coat might cost anywhere from $18 to $28. A milkshake might cost a dime, and a bag of roasted peanuts could be purchased for a penny. Since many families had so little money, certain things that were once commonplace became luxuries. For example, going to the barber was no longer an option for many families. Haircuts at home became standard practice. Families also stopped going to the dentist for regular check-ups, and doctor visits were saved for very serious conditions. Some women even started giving birth at home in an effort to save money. Unfortunately, not every family could afford to go shopping or purchase new clothes. Some families were forced to patch shoes with rubber from worn out tires. Even families that had once been affluent began dressing their children in hand-me-downs. The Great Depression made life extremely difficult for many people. Unemployment rates reached unbelievable numbers, with as much as 25% of the population unable to find work. This meant that an estimated 13-15 million Americans did not have a job. Those looking for work were desperate. A business would advertise for six positions that needed to be filled and more than 15,000 applicants would apply. Some of those who couldn't find work began riding the rails. Known as hobos, they illegally boarded boxcars on trains, hoping to find work in the next town. Those who were fortunate enough to keep their job saw their wages slashed by as much as 60%. A worker who had once made $1 an hour would be reduced to 40 cents and be happy to have it. All across the nation, fathers who had once held important positions in companies were now searching dumpsters for their family's next meal. Food was scarce for many. Cabbage soup became a common meal. Meat and vegetables could no longer be afforded. Some families even resorted to taking turns eating. Some members of the family would eat on Mondays, Wednesday, and Fridays, while others ate on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays (with perhaps the entire family eating together on Sunday). In order to cut heating costs, families resigned to heating only one room of their house. They used many different heating sources, from wood, to coal that they had found, or even corncobs. In an effort to save money, many families shared homes. Some younger children were sent away to live with relatives in a different part of the country. In other cases, kids as young as 13 were told to leave home and go find work. Obviously, every family was different, and each had its own set of circumstances. However, each family did everything it could to make it through one of the most difficult times in American history.

Contents

Incumbents

Federal Government

Events

January–March

April–June

May 20: Chrysler Building completed
May 20: Chrysler Building completed

July–September

October–December

Undated

  • A Jake paralysis outbreak occurs in United States.
  • W9XAP in Chicago, Illinois, broadcasts the U.S. senatorial election returns, which is the first time a senatorial race, with non-stop vote tallies, is ever televised.
  • 1930–1931 – Crazy Horse’s lifelong friend, He Dog, is interviewed by journalist Eleanor Hinman and Nebraska writer Mari Sandoz.
  • A record drought in the eastern part of the nation[2] sees Upper Tract, West Virginia record only 9.50 inches (241.3 mm) of precipitation for the year – the record lowest for a calendar year in the US east of the Mississippi.[3] Averaged over the contiguous US the twelve months from July 1930 to June 1931 remains the driest such period on record.[4]

Ongoing

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

See also

References

  1. ^ Aaseng, Nathan (2005). Business Builders In Sweets and Treats. The Oliver Press. p. 80. ISBN 1-881508-84-6.
  2. ^ Henry, Alfred J.; ‘The Weather of 1930 in the United States’; Monthly Weather Review, December 1930, pp. 351-354
  3. ^ Record Minimum Annual Precipitation by State
  4. ^ Climate at a Glance: Contiguous US Precipitation July to June; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

External links

This page was last edited on 9 July 2019, at 15:20
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