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1920 United States presidential election in South Dakota

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1920 United States presidential election in South Dakota

← 1916 November 2, 1920 1924 →
 
Warren G Harding portrait as senator June 1920.jpg
James M. Cox 1920.jpg
Parley Parker Christensen circa 1920 (cropped).jpg
Nominee Warren G. Harding James M. Cox Parley P. Christensen
Party Republican Democratic Nonpartisan League
Home state Ohio Ohio Illinois
Running mate Calvin Coolidge Franklin D. Roosevelt Max S. Hayes
Electoral vote 5 0 0
Popular vote 110,692 35,938 34,707
Percentage 60.74% 19.72% 19.04%

South Dakota Presidential Election Results 1920.svg
County Results
Harding
  40-50%
  50-60%
  60-70%
  70-80%


President before election

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic

Elected President

Warren G. Harding
Republican

The 1920 United States presidential election in South Dakota took place on November 2, 1920 as part of the 1920 United States presidential election in which all contemporary forty-eight states participated. Voters chose five electors, or representatives to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

The 1918 mid-term elections had seen the Midwestern farming community largely desert the Democratic Party due to supposed preferential treatment of Southern farmers:[1] Democratic seats in the Midwest fell from thirty-four to seventeen,[2] whilst Scandinavian-Americans were also vigorously opposed to entering the war.[3] Moreover, Democratic fear of Communism seen in the Palmer Raids and "Red Scare" led to Cox, then Governor of Ohio, to ban German-language instruction in public schools in 1919.[2] Much more critical for German-Americans was the view that outgoing President Woodrow Wilson was deliberately trying to punish Germany and Austria for starting the war, especially via his disregard for the United Kingdom's continuing blockade of Germany.[4] Stressing Harding's German ancestry, the German press drummed up the view that "a vote for Harding is a vote against the persecutions suffered by German-Americans during the war."[5]

As the campaign began after the Republican Party had nominated U.S. Senator Warren G. Harding of Ohio and the Democratic Party former Ohio governor James M. Cox, a further blow to the Democrats occurred when the national economy suffered a major downturn following the wartime boom, resulting in plummeting agricultural prices that were especially problematic in the Midwest.[6] Whereas Cox travelled throughout the nation apart from the "Solid South" during September,[7] Harding, despite having four times the budget, campaigned from his home in Marion, Ohio. A poll by the giant Rexall drug store chain – which in 1916 had been accurate enough to predict Wilson's razor-thin wins in New Hampshire and California[8] – suggested Harding would win 382 electoral votes,[9] and at the end of October, although no more opinion polls had been published, most observers were even more convinced that the Republicans would take complete control of all branches of government.[10]

Vote

The late-October predictions of a complete takeover of the federal government by the Republican Party were entirely born out. So unpopular was Wilson that – although South Dakota was the only Plains state Wilson had lost in 1916 – Cox lost over half the Wilson vote from that election, and lost every county. In fact, Non Partisan League[a] candidate Parley Parker Christensen finished second ahead of Cox in twenty-nine counties and was only 1,231 votes behind the Democratic candidate in South Dakota as a whole. Aided by German Lutheran hostility towards Prohibition, Christensen gained over 41 percent in Hutchinson County, and over thirty percent in three other East River counties.

Results

Presidential Candidate Running Mate Party Electoral Vote (EV) Popular Vote (PV)
Warren G. Harding Calvin Coolidge Republican 5[11] 110,692 60.74%
James M. Cox Franklin D. Roosevelt Democratic 0 35,938 19.72%
Parley P. Christensen Max S. Hayes Non Partisan League 0 34,707 19.04%
Aaron S. Watkins D. Leigh Colvin Independent 0 900 0.49%

Results by county

County[12] Warren Gamaliel Harding
Republican
James Middleton Cox
Democratic
Parley Parker Christensen
Nonpartisan League
Aaron Sherman Watkins
Independent
Margin Total votes cast
# % # % # % # % # %
Aurora 1,004 49.19% 445 21.80% 589 28.86% 3 0.15% 415[b] 20.33% 2,041
Beadle 2,852 56.54% 925 18.34% 1,240 24.58% 27 0.54% 1,612[b] 31.96% 5,044
Bennett 220 48.67% 199 44.03% 30 6.64% 3 0.66% 21 4.65% 452
Bon Homme 1,872 53.23% 960 27.30% 676 19.22% 9 0.26% 912 25.93% 3,517
Brookings 2,743 68.64% 564 14.11% 613 15.34% 76 1.90% 2,130[b] 53.30% 3,996
Brown 5,581 56.54% 1,364 13.82% 2,893 29.31% 33 0.33% 2,688[b] 27.23% 9,871
Brule 1,036 51.03% 671 33.05% 310 15.27% 13 0.64% 365 17.98% 2,030
Buffalo 200 59.70% 101 30.15% 30 8.96% 4 1.19% 99 29.55% 335
Butte 1,722 54.51% 672 21.27% 741 23.46% 24 0.76% 981[b] 31.05% 3,159
Campbell 1,128 71.26% 67 4.23% 383 24.19% 5 0.32% 745[b] 47.06% 1,583
Charles Mix 2,021 50.17% 1,305 32.40% 696 17.28% 6 0.15% 716 17.78% 4,028
Clark 1,753 60.24% 437 15.02% 692 23.78% 28 0.96% 1,061[b] 36.46% 2,910
Clay 1,885 61.88% 907 29.78% 248 8.14% 6 0.20% 978 32.11% 3,046
Codington 2,706 59.84% 867 19.17% 929 20.54% 20 0.44% 1,777[b] 39.30% 4,522
Corson 1,448 60.89% 484 20.35% 424 17.83% 22 0.93% 964 40.54% 2,378
Custer 784 60.82% 383 29.71% 116 9.00% 6 0.47% 401 31.11% 1,289
Davison 2,605 54.16% 1,105 22.97% 1,073 22.31% 27 0.56% 1,500 31.19% 4,810
Day 2,739 59.82% 436 9.52% 1,378 30.09% 26 0.57% 1,361[b] 29.72% 4,579
Deuel 1,569 69.95% 159 7.09% 498 22.20% 17 0.76% 1,071[b] 47.75% 2,243
Dewey 880 63.31% 335 24.10% 172 12.37% 3 0.22% 545 39.21% 1,390
Douglas 1,247 63.49% 386 19.65% 325 16.55% 6 0.31% 861 43.84% 1,964
Edmunds 1,486 60.36% 283 11.49% 681 27.66% 12 0.49% 805[b] 32.70% 2,462
Fall River 1,236 61.01% 680 33.56% 106 5.23% 4 0.20% 556 27.44% 2,026
Faulk 1,341 65.51% 346 16.90% 353 17.24% 7 0.34% 988[b] 48.27% 2,047
Grant 1,813 59.99% 350 11.58% 856 28.33% 3 0.10% 957[b] 31.67% 3,022
Gregory 1,833 57.61% 744 23.38% 601 18.89% 4 0.13% 1,089 34.22% 3,182
Haakon 713 49.65% 393 27.37% 321 22.35% 9 0.63% 320 22.28% 1,436
Hamlin 1,322 63.68% 337 16.23% 398 19.17% 19 0.92% 924[b] 44.51% 2,076
Hand 1,511 61.08% 655 26.48% 291 11.76% 17 0.69% 856 34.60% 2,474
Hanson 1,001 51.87% 418 21.66% 508 26.32% 3 0.16% 493[b] 25.54% 1,930
Harding 648 58.43% 213 19.21% 241 21.73% 7 0.63% 407[b] 36.70% 1,109
Hughes 1,313 68.31% 433 22.53% 172 8.95% 4 0.21% 880 45.79% 1,922
Hutchinson 1,873 51.15% 243 6.64% 1,528 41.73% 18 0.49% 345[b] 9.42% 3,662
Hyde 710 68.53% 233 22.49% 92 8.88% 1 0.10% 477 46.04% 1,036
Jackson 595 70.58% 206 24.44% 42 4.98% 0 0.00% 389 46.14% 843
Jerauld 1,038 57.03% 357 19.62% 397 21.81% 28 1.54% 641[b] 35.22% 1,820
Jones 609 62.33% 255 26.10% 110 11.26% 3 0.31% 354 36.23% 977
Kingsbury 2,344 71.66% 481 14.70% 429 13.12% 17 0.52% 1,863 56.96% 3,271
Lake 2,333 69.98% 398 11.94% 590 17.70% 13 0.39% 1,743[b] 52.28% 3,334
Lawrence 2,986 68.50% 1,201 27.55% 151 3.46% 21 0.48% 1,785 40.95% 4,359
Lincoln 2,790 73.54% 441 11.62% 555 14.63% 8 0.21% 2,235[b] 58.91% 3,794
Lyman 1,050 59.63% 463 26.29% 244 13.86% 4 0.23% 587 33.33% 1,761
Marshall 1,557 55.97% 266 9.56% 954 34.29% 5 0.18% 603[b] 21.68% 2,782
McCook 1,864 60.52% 565 18.34% 623 20.23% 28 0.91% 1,241[b] 40.29% 3,080
McPherson 1,470 72.92% 112 5.56% 415 20.59% 19 0.94% 1,055[b] 52.33% 2,016
Meade 1,894 58.37% 894 27.55% 436 13.44% 21 0.65% 1,000 30.82% 3,245
Mellette 533 63.53% 261 31.11% 44 5.24% 1 0.12% 272 32.42% 839
Miner 1,450 56.73% 651 25.47% 448 17.53% 7 0.27% 799 31.26% 2,556
Minnehaha 8,290 63.15% 2,534 19.30% 2,220 16.91% 83 0.63% 5,756 43.85% 13,127
Moody 1,667 63.55% 371 14.14% 570 21.73% 15 0.57% 1,097[b] 41.82% 2,623
Pennington 2,568 64.23% 1,205 30.14% 212 5.30% 13 0.33% 1,363 34.09% 3,998
Perkins 1,326 60.41% 417 19.00% 441 20.09% 11 0.50% 885[b] 40.32% 2,195
Potter 1,073 72.30% 255 17.18% 140 9.43% 16 1.08% 818 55.12% 1,484
Roberts 2,335 49.73% 447 9.52% 1,889 40.23% 24 0.51% 446[b] 9.50% 4,695
Sanborn 1,125 49.89% 517 22.93% 594 26.34% 19 0.84% 531[b] 23.55% 2,255
Spink 2,923 65.09% 785 17.48% 760 16.92% 23 0.51% 2,138 47.61% 4,491
Stanley 598 56.79% 394 37.42% 58 5.51% 3 0.28% 204 19.37% 1,053
Sully 542 62.95% 147 17.07% 170 19.74% 2 0.23% 372[b] 43.21% 861
Tripp 1,819 59.33% 968 31.57% 275 8.97% 4 0.13% 851 27.76% 3,066
Turner 2,703 67.59% 604 15.10% 689 17.23% 3 0.08% 2,014[b] 50.36% 3,999
Union 1,942 66.17% 841 28.65% 142 4.84% 10 0.34% 1,101 37.51% 2,935
Walworth 1,411 61.40% 478 20.80% 398 17.32% 11 0.48% 933 40.60% 2,298
Yankton 2,555 61.80% 1,147 27.75% 420 10.16% 12 0.29% 1,408 34.06% 4,134
Ziebach 507 65.42% 177 22.84% 87 11.23% 4 0.52% 330 42.58% 775
Totals 110,692 60.74% 35,938 19.72% 34,707 19.04% 900 0.49% 74,754 41.02% 182,237

Notes

  1. ^ In the other eighteen states where Christensen was on the ballot, he was listed under the label of “Farmer-Labor” or “Labor”.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac In this county where Cox ran third behind Christensen as well as behind Harding, margin given is Harding vote minus Christensen vote and percentage margin Harding percentage minus Christensen percentage.

References

  1. ^ Morello, John A.; Albert D. Lasker, Advertising, and the Election of Warren G. Harding, p. 64 ISBN 0275970302
  2. ^ a b Hough, Jerry F.; Changing Party Coalitions: The Mystery of the Red State-Blue State Alignment, pp. 86-87 ISBN 0875864090
  3. ^ Saldin, Robert P., 'World War I and the System of 1896' (2010); Political Science Faculty Publications, Paper 1, pp. 825-836
  4. ^ Lichtman, Allan J.; Prejudice and the Old Politics: The Presidential Election of 1928, pp. 102, 115
  5. ^ Lubell, Samuel; The Future of American Politics, p. 135 Published 1952 by Harper and Brothers, New York
  6. ^ Goldberg, David Joseph; Discontented America: The United States in the 1920s, p. 47 ISBN 0801860059
  7. ^ Faykosh, Joseph D., Bowling Green State University; The Front Porch of the American People: James Cox and the Presidential Election of 1920 (thesis), p. 69
  8. ^ Pietrusza, David; 1920: The Year of the Six Presidents, p. 398 ISBN 0786721022
  9. ^ Bagby, Rexby; The Road to Normalcy: The Presidential Campaign and Election of 1920, pp. 158-159 ISBN 0801800455
  10. ^ 'Republicans Going to Win: Prospects of a Complete Victory'; The Observer, October 31, 1920, p. 13
  11. ^ Dave Leip. "1920 Presidential General Election Results – South Dakota". Dave Leip’s U.S. Election Atlas.
  12. ^ South Dakota Secretary of State; Official Vote November, 1920 Presidential Electors (highest elector)
This page was last edited on 12 September 2020, at 19:21
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