To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1915 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1915
MCMXV
Ab urbe condita2668
Armenian calendar1364
ԹՎ ՌՅԿԴ
Assyrian calendar6665
Bahá'í calendar71–72
Balinese saka calendar1836–1837
Bengali calendar1322
Berber calendar2865
British Regnal yearGeo. 5 – 6 Geo. 5
Buddhist calendar2459
Burmese calendar1277
Byzantine calendar7423–7424
Chinese calendar甲寅(Wood Tiger)
4611 or 4551
    — to —
乙卯年 (Wood Rabbit)
4612 or 4552
Coptic calendar1631–1632
Discordian calendar3081
Ethiopian calendar1907–1908
Hebrew calendar5675–5676
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1971–1972
 - Shaka Samvat1836–1837
 - Kali Yuga5015–5016
Holocene calendar11915
Igbo calendar915–916
Iranian calendar1293–1294
Islamic calendar1333–1334
Japanese calendarTaishō 4
(大正4年)
Javanese calendar1845–1846
Juche calendar4
Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days
Korean calendar4248
Minguo calendarROC 4
民國4年
Nanakshahi calendar447
Thai solar calendar2457–2458
Tibetan calendar阳木虎年
(male Wood-Tiger)
2041 or 1660 or 888
    — to —
阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
2042 or 1661 or 889

1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1915th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 915th year of the 2nd millennium, the 15th year of the 20th century, and the 6th year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1915, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/5
    Views:
    498 356
    336 306
    332 659
    1 037 845
    178 394
  • ✪ World War One - 1915
  • ✪ The attack of the LIVING DEAD - 1915 - IT'S HISTORY
  • ✪ Gallipoli 1915 - The Great War DOCUMENTARY
  • ✪ The Gallipoli Campaign (1915)
  • ✪ Beretta 1915: the First of the Beretta Pistols

Transcription

January 1915. World War One is just five months old, and already around one million soldiers have fallen. A war that began in the Balkans has engulfed much of the world. The Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottoman Empire, fight the Allies: Britain, France, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Belgium, and Japan. In Poland and the Baltic, the Russian army has suffered a string of massive defeats, but continues to battle German and Austro-Hungarian forces. Austro-Hungarian troops have also suffered huge losses, and are humiliated by their failure to defeat Serbia. In the Caucasus Mountains, Russian and Ottoman forces fight each other in freezing winter conditions. While on the Western Front, French, British and Belgian troops are dug in facing the Germans, in trenches stretching from the English Channel to Switzerland. As part of the world’s first strategic bombing campaign, Germany sends two giant airships, known as Zeppelins, to bomb Britain. They hit the ports of King's Lynn and Great Yarmouth, damaging houses and killing 4 civilians. At sea, at the Battle of Dogger Bank, the British navy sinks one German cruiser, but the rest of the German squadron escapes. Command of the seas has allowed Britain to impose a naval blockade of Germany, preventing vital supplies, including food, from reaching the country by sea. Germany now retaliates with its own blockade: it declares the waters around the British Isles to be a war zone, where its U-boats will attack Allied merchant ships without warning. Britain relies on imported food to feed its population. Germany plans to starve her into surrender. On the Eastern Front, German Field Marshal von Hindenburg launches a Winter Offensive, and inflicts another massive defeat on the Russian army at the Second Battle of Masurian Lakes. The Russians lose up to 200,000 men, half of them surrendering amid freezing winter conditions. The Russians have more success against Austria-Hungary: the city of Przemyśl falls after a four month siege, netting the Russians 100,000 prisoners. Austria-Hungary's total losses now reach two million. Meanwhile, the British and French send warships to the Dardanelles, to threaten Constantinople, capital of the Turkish Ottoman Empire. They believe a show of force will quickly cause Turkey to surrender. They bombard Turkish shore-forts in the narrow straits, but three battleships are sunk by mines, and three more damaged. The attack is called off. On the Western Front, the British attack at Neuve Chapelle, but the advance is soon halted by German barbed wire and machineguns. British and Indian units suffer 11,000 casualties – about a quarter of the attacking force. Six weeks later, at the Second Battle of Ypres, the Germans attack with poison gas for the first time on the Western Front. A cloud of lethal chlorine gas forces Allied troops to abandon their trenches, but the Germans don't have enough reserves ready to exploit the advantage. Soldiers on both sides are quickly supplied with crude gas-masks, as a chemical weapons arms-race begins. The Allies land ground troops at Gallipoli, including men of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, the ANZACs. Their goal is to take out the shore forts that are preventing Allied warships reaching Constantinople. But they immediately meet fierce Turkish resistance, and are pinned down close to the shore. The day before the landings, the Ottoman Empire begins the systematic deportation and murder of ethnic Armenians living within its borders. The Armenians are a long-persecuted ethnic and religious minority, suspected of supporting Turkey's enemies. Tens of thousands of men, women and children are transported to the Syrian desert and left to die. In all, more than a million Armenians perish. The Allies condemn the events as 'a crime against humanity and civilisation', and promise to hold the perpetrators criminally responsible. To this day, the Turkish government disputes the death toll, and that these events constituted a 'genocide'. On the Eastern Front, a joint German / Austro-Hungarian offensive in Galicia breaks through Russian defences, recapturing Przemyśl and taking 100,000 prisoners. It is the beginning of a steady advance against Russian forces. At sea, the British passenger-liner Lusitania, sailing from New York to Liverpool, is torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Ireland without warning. 1,198 passengers and crew perish, including 128 Americans. US President Woodrow Wilson and the American public are outraged. But Germany insists the liner was a fair target, as the British used her to carry military supplies. In May, the Allies launch the Second Battle of Artois, in another effort to break through the German lines. The French make the main attack at Vimy Ridge, while the British launch supporting attacks at Aubers Ridge and Festubert. The Allies sustain 130,000 casualties, and advance just a few thousand yards. That summer, above the Western Front, the Fokker Eindecker helps Germany win control of the air. It's one of the first aircraft with a machinegun able to fire forward through its propeller, thanks to a new invention known as interruptor gear. Allied aircraft losses mount rapidly, in what becomes known as the 'Fokker Scourge'. Italy, swayed by British and French promises of territorial gains at Austro-Hungarian expense, joins the Allies, declaring war on Austria-Hungary, and later the Ottoman Empire and Germany. The Italian army makes its first assault against Austro-Hungarian positions along the Isonzo river, but is repulsed with heavy losses. Meanwhile the Allies face a crisis on the Eastern Front. The Russians have begun a general retreat, abandoning Poland. German troops enter Warsaw on 5th August. Tsar Nicholas II dismisses the army's commander-in-chief, Grand Duke Nicholas, and takes personal command. It will prove disastrous for the Tsar, as he becomes more and more closely tied to Russian military defeat. At Gallipoli, the Allies land reinforcements at Suvla Bay, but neither they nor a series of fresh attacks by the ANZACs can break the deadlock. Conditions for both sides are terrible; troops are tormented not only by the enemy, but by heat, flies, and sickness. In the Atlantic, a German U-boat sinks the liner SS Arabic: 44 are lost, including three Americans. In response to further US warnings, Germany ends all attacks on passenger ships. On the Western Front, the Allies mount their biggest offensive of the war so far, designed to smash through the front, and take pressure off their beleaguered Russian ally. The French attack in the Third Battle of Artois and Second Battle of Champagne; The British, with the help of poison gas, attack at Loos. Despite initial gains, the attacks soon get bogged down, with enormous losses on all sides. Allied troops land at Salonika in Greece, to open a new front against the Central Powers, and bring aid to Serbia. But the Allies are too late. Bulgaria joins the Central Powers, and their joint offensive overruns Serbia in two months. That winter the remnants of the Serbian Army escape through the Albanian mountains. Their losses are horrific – by the end of the war a third of Serbia's army has been killed – the highest proportion of any nation. Fierce fighting continues on the Italian front, as Italian troops launch the Third and Fourth Battles of the Isonzo. Austro-Hungarian forces, though outnumbered, are dug in on the high ground, and impossible to dislodge. In the Middle East, a British advance on Baghdad is blocked by Turkish forces at the Battle of Ctesiphon, 25 miles south of the city. The British withdraw to Kut, where they are besieged. The Allies abandon the Gallipoli campaign. 83,000 troops are secretly evacuated without alerting Turkish forces. Not a man is lost. It's one of the best executed plans of the war. The campaign has cost both sides quarter of a million casualties. 1915 is a bad year for the Allies – enormous losses, for no tangible gains. But there is no talk of peace – instead all sides prepare for even bigger offensives in 1916, with new tactics developed from earlier failures. All sides still believe a decisive battlefield victory is within grasp. Epic History TV relies on the support of viewers like you – please visit our Patreon page, and consider pledging as little as $1 per video to help us keep making them.

Contents

Events

January 1: HMS Formidable, sunk by a German U-boat.
January 1: HMS Formidable, sunk by a German U-boat.

Below, the events of World War I have the "WWI" prefix.

January

February

March

March 14: WWI: SMS Dresden, forced to scuttle by the Royal Navy.
March 14: WWI: SMS Dresden, forced to scuttle by the Royal Navy.

April

May 7: WWI: RMS Lusitania, sunk by a German U-boat.
May 7: WWI: RMS Lusitania, sunk by a German U-boat.

May

June

July

August

August: Destruction by the 1915 Galveston hurricane.
August: Destruction by the 1915 Galveston hurricane.

September

October

November

December

Date unknown

Births

Births
January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Nobel Prizes

Notes

  1. ^ "The Great Escape". Pawn Stars. Season 4. Episode 28. May 9, 2011. History.
  2. ^ "No Jacket Can Hold Him", Life, accessed May 9, 2011.
  3. ^ Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN 0-14-102715-0.
  4. ^ Heller, Charles E. (September 1984). "Chemical Warfare in World War I: The American Experience, 1917–1918". Leaveanworth Papers, 10. Combat Studies Institute. Retrieved August 24, 2012.
  5. ^ Johnston, Willie (March 12, 2015). "Centenary of HMS Bayano disaster off the Galloway coast". BBC News. Retrieved March 24, 2015.
  6. ^ Paull, John (2018) The Women Who Tried to Stop the Great War: The International Congress of Women at The Hague 1915, In A. H. Campbell (Ed.), Global Leadership Initiatives for Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding (pp. 249-266). (Chapter 12) Hershey, PA: IGI Global.
  7. ^ Simon, Hyacinthe (1991). Mardine la ville héroïque. Jounieh-Lebanon: Maison Naaman pour la culture.
  8. ^ Jonasson, Stefan. "100 years of women's suffrage in Iceland". Lögberg Heimskringla. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  9. ^ Shlaim, Avi (2008). Lion of Jordan. London: Penguin Books. p. 2. ISBN 978-0-141-01728-0.
  10. ^ In Die Weißen Blätter.
  11. ^ “Washington, Oct. 25.” The New York Times, October 26, 1915.
  12. ^ Shackleton, Ernest (1983). South. London: Century Publishing. p. 98. ISBN 0-7126-0111-2.
  13. ^ "Ernest Shackleton, Endurance Voyage, Time Line and Map". CoolAntarctica.com. 2001. Archived from the original on October 16, 2012. Retrieved October 27, 2012.
  14. ^ Einstein, Albert (November 25, 1915). "Die Feldgleichungen der Gravitation". Sitzungsberichte der Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin: 844–847. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  15. ^ "Biography of Porfirio Diaz, Ruler of Mexico for 35 Years". ThoughtCo. Retrieved May 29, 2019.

Further reading

  • Williams, John. The Other Battleground The Home Fronts: Britain, France and Germany 1914–1918 (1972) pp 43–108.

Primary sources and year books

  • New International Year Book 1915, Comprehensive coverage of world and national affairs, 791pp
  • Hazell's Annual for 1916 (1916), worldwide events of 1915; 640pp online; worldwide coverage of 1915 events; emphasis on Great Britain

External links

This page was last edited on 4 November 2019, at 00:24
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.