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1908 Major League Baseball season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1908 MLB season
LeagueAmerican League, National League
SportBaseball
DurationApril 14 – October 14, 1908
Number of games154
Number of teams8 (AL), 8 (NL)
Pennant Winners
AL championsDetroit Tigers
  AL runners-upCleveland Naps
NL championsChicago Cubs
  NL runners-upNew York Giants
World Series
ChampionsChicago Cubs
  Runners-upDetroit Tigers
 MLB seasons
Locations of teams for the 1908 American League season
American League

The 1908 major league baseball season began on April 14, 1908. The regular season ended on October 8, with the Chicago Cubs and Detroit Tigers as regular season champions of the National League and American League, respectively. In a rematch of the prior year's postseason, the postseason began with Game 1 of the fifth modern World Series on October 10 and ended with Game 5 on October 14. The Cubs defeated the Tigers, four games to one.

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Transcription

Teams

League Team City Stadium Capacity
American League Boston Red Sox Boston, Massachusetts Huntington Avenue Grounds 11,500
Chicago White Sox Chicago, Illinois South Side Park 15,000
Cleveland Naps Cleveland, Ohio League Park 9,000
Detroit Tigers Detroit, Michigan Bennett Park 8,500
New York Highlanders New York, New York Hilltop Park 16,000
Philadelphia Athletics Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Columbia Park 13,600
St. Louis Browns St. Louis, Missouri Sportsman's Park 8,000
Washington Senators Washington, D.C. National Park Unknown
National League Boston Doves Boston, Massachusetts South End Grounds 11,000
Brooklyn Superbas New York, New York Washington Park 18,800
Chicago Cubs Chicago, Illinois West Side Park 16,000
Cincinnati Reds Cincinnati, Ohio Palace of the Fans 6,000
New York Giants New York, New York Polo Grounds 16,000
Philadelphia Phillies Philadelphia, Pennsylvania National League Park 18,000
Pittsburgh Pirates Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Exposition Park 16,000
St. Louis Cardinals St. Louis, Missouri Robison Field Unknown

Schedule

The 1908 schedule consisted of 154 games for all teams in the American League and National League, each of which had eight teams. Each team was scheduled to play 22 games against the other seven teams of their respective league. This continued the format put in place for the 1904 season. This format would last until 1919.

Opening Day took place on April 14 with all but the Pittsburgh Pirates and St. Louis Cardinals playing. The final day of the regular season was on October 8. The World Series took place between October 10 and October 14.

Rule changes

On February 27, 1908, the three organizations of the National Commission of Baseball Clubs, National League, and American League announced several rule changes, effective immediately.[1]

  • The act of rubbing the ball on the ground, clothing, shoes, or dropping the ball and picking it up with a handful of gravel or dirt by the pitcher was prohibited.
  • The sacrifice fly rule is adopted. No time at bat is charged if a run scores after the catch of a fly ball. The rule would eventually be repealed in 1931, then reinstated (or changed) several times before gaining permanent acceptance in 1954.
  • The trend of each team playing 22 games with every other in-league team was written into the Major League Baseball Constitution, with rules for playing makeup games at the originally scheduled ballpark in the event of tie games, rain delays, and other game-preventing situations being put in place. If the series of all scheduled games has ended with makeup games remaining, if possible, the remaining game(s) can be made up on the opposite team's ballpark, with a date agreed by the two teams.

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

World Series
   
AL Detroit Tigers 1
NL Chicago Cubs 4

Managers

League leaders

American League

National League

Home field attendance

Team name Wins Home attendance Per game
New York Giants[2] 98 19.5% 910,000 69.0% 11,375
Chicago Cubs[3] 99 -7.5% 665,325 57.5% 8,530
Chicago White Sox[4] 88 1.1% 636,096 -4.5% 8,155
St. Louis Browns[5] 83 20.3% 618,947 47.7% 7,935
Boston Red Sox[6] 75 27.1% 473,048 8.3% 6,143
Philadelphia Athletics[7] 68 -22.7% 455,062 -27.3% 5,834
Detroit Tigers[8] 90 -2.2% 436,199 46.8% 5,592
Cleveland Naps[9] 90 5.9% 422,262 10.5% 5,414
Philadelphia Phillies[10] 83 0.0% 420,660 23.3% 5,393
Cincinnati Reds[11] 73 10.6% 399,200 25.7% 5,184
Pittsburgh Pirates[12] 98 7.7% 382,444 19.7% 4,967
New York Highlanders[13] 51 -27.1% 305,500 -12.7% 3,968
Brooklyn Superbas[14] 53 -18.5% 275,600 -11.8% 3,579
Washington Senators[15] 67 36.7% 264,252 19.1% 3,388
Boston Doves[16] 63 8.6% 253,750 24.9% 3,253
St. Louis Cardinals[17] 49 -5.8% 205,129 10.7% 2,664

Events


References

  1. ^ "PITCHERS MUST NOT SOIL NEW BASEBALL; Rules Committee Puts Ban on Custom Which Tends to Delay the Game. NEW SACRIFICE HIT RULE Batter Is Credited with No Time at Bat When He Drives In a Runner on Fly Ball That Is Caught". The New York Times. February 28, 1908. Retrieved April 13, 2024.
  2. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  3. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  4. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  5. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  6. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  7. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  8. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  9. ^ "Cleveland Guardians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  10. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  11. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  12. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  13. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  14. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  15. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  16. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  17. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2024.
  18. ^ Pellowski, Michael J (2007). The Little Giant Book of Baseball Facts. United States: Sterling Publishing Co. pp. 352. ISBN 9781402742736.
  19. ^ "Runs Scored – Season Records". baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved June 6, 2012.

Bibliography

  • Anderson, David W. (2000). More Than Merkle: A History of the Best and Most Exciting Baseball Season in Human History. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 0-8032-1056-6.
  • Fleming, G.H. (1981). The Unforgettable Season: The Most Exciting & Calamitous Pennant Race of All Time. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston. ISBN 0-03-056221-X.
  • Murphy, Cait. (2007). Crazy '08: How a Cast of Cranks, Rogues, Boneheads, and Magnates Created the Greatest Year in Baseball History. New York: HarperCollins/Smithsonian Books. ISBN 0-06-088937-3.

External links

This page was last edited on 7 May 2024, at 16:48
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