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1802 and 1803 United States House of Representatives elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1802 and 1803 United States House of Representatives elections

← 1800 / 1801 April 26, 1802 – December 14, 1803 1804 / 1805 →

All 142 seats in the U.S House of Representatives
72 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
 
NC-Congress-NathanielMacon.jpg
John Cotton Smith engraving.png
Leader Nathaniel Macon John Cotton Smith
Party Democratic-Republican Federalist
Leader's seat North Carolina 6th Connecticut at-large
Last election 68 seats 38 seats
Seats won 103 39
Seat change Increase 35 Increase 1

Speaker before election

Nathaniel Macon
Democratic-Republican

Elected Speaker

Nathaniel Macon
Democratic-Republican

Elections to the United States House of Representatives for the 8th Congress were held at various dates in each state, from April 26, 1802 (in New York) to December 14, 1803 (in New Jersey) during Thomas Jefferson's first term in office. It was common in the early years of the United Congress for some states to elect representatives to a Congress after it had already convened. In the case of the 8th Congress, the representatives from New Jersey were only elected after its first meeting on October 17, 1803.

The membership of the House increased significantly as a result of population gains revealed in the United States Census of 1800. The greatest growth was in territories that constituted the western regions of the country at the time, a tremendous boost for Democratic-Republican candidates. Nearly all of the new seats created in reapportionment after the 1800 census went to Democratic-Republicans, closely aligned as they were with the agrarian interests of Western farmers. As a result, the Democratic-Republicans won the largest proportion of seats that either they or the competing Federalists had ever been able to secure in any earlier Congress, a supermajority greater than two-thirds of the total number.

Election summaries

These elections were the first following reapportionment after the 1800 Census. Thirty-five new seats were added in reapportionment,[1] with three states having no change in apportionment, and thirteen states gaining between 1 and 7 seats. One further seat was added for the new state of Ohio, which is included in this table below.[2]

102 40
Democratic-Republican Federalist
State Type Date Total
seats
Democratic-
Republican
Federalist
Seats Change Seats Change Seats Change
New York Districts April 26–29, 1802 17 Increase7 12 Increase6 5 Increase1
Connecticut At-large August 20, 1802 7 Steady 0 Steady 7 Steady
New Hampshire At-large August 30, 1802 5 Increase1 0 Steady 5 Increase1
Rhode Island At-large August 31, 1802 2 Steady 2 Steady 0 Steady
Georgia At-large October 4, 1802 4 Increase2 4 Increase2 0 Steady
Delaware At-large October 5, 1802 1 Steady 1 Increase1 0 Decrease1
Pennsylvania Districts October 12, 1802 18 Increase5 18 Increase8 0 Decrease3
Massachusetts District November 1, 1802[a] 17 Increase3 7 Steady 10 Increase3
Vermont Districts December 13, 1802[b] 4 Increase2 1 Steady 3 Increase2
Maryland Districts January 1, 1803 9 Increase1 6 Increase1 3 Steady
South Carolina Districts February 3, 1803 8 Increase2 6 Increase3 2 Decrease1
Late elections (After the March 4, 1803 beginning of Congress)
Virginia Districts April 1803 22 Increase3 18 Steady 4 Increase3
Kentucky Districts August 2, 1803 6 Increase4 6 Increase4 0 Steady
Tennessee At-large August 5, 1803 3 Increase2 3 Increase2 0 Steady
North Carolina Districts August 15, 1803 12 Increase2 11 Increase5 1 Decrease3
Very late elections (After the October 17, 1803 beginning of 1st session)
New Jersey At-large December 14, 1803 6 Increase1 6 Increase1 0 Steady
Election of new state during 8th Congress
Ohio At-large June 21, 1803 1 Increase1 1 Increase1 0 Steady
Total 142 Increase36 102
71.8%
Increase34 40
28.2%
Increase2
House seats
Democratic-Republican
71.83%
Federalist
28.17%

Special elections

There were special elections in 1802 and 1803 during the 7th United States Congress and 8th United States Congress.

Elections are sorted here by date then district.

7th Congress

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Maryland 2 Richard Sprigg, Jr. Democratic-Republican 1801 Incumbent resigned February 11, 1802.
New member elected March 2, 1802.
Democratic-Republican hold.
New member seated March 24, 1802.
New member was later elected to the next term, see below.
South Carolina 4 Thomas Sumter Democratic-Republican 1788
1792 (Lost)
1796
Incumbent resigned December 15, 1801 when elected U.S. Senator.
New member elected April 13, 1802.
Democratic-Republican hold.
New member seated January 24, 1803.[4]
Georgia at-large Benjamin Taliaferro Democratic-Republican 1798 Incumbent resigned sometime in 1802.
New member elected April 26, 1802.
Democratic-Republican hold.
New member seated December 6, 1802.
  • Green tickY David Meriwether (Democratic-Republican) 86.95%
  • Samuel Hammond 7.72%
  • William Bryant 2.94%
  • Francis Willis 1.02%
  • William Stith 0.81%
  • Thomas P. Carnes 0.34%
  • James MacNeil 0.21%
Massachusetts 12 Silas Lee Federalist 1798 Incumbent resigned August 20, 1801.
New member elected July 29, 1802 on the fifth ballot.
Federalist hold.
New member seated December 6, 1802.
First ballot (September 25, 1801):
Orchard Cook (Democratic-Republican) 47.9%
Martin Kingsley (Democratic-Republican) 23.6%
Nathaniel Drummer (Unknown) 24.1%
Scattering 4.3%[6]

Second ballot (December 7, 1801):
Orchard Cook (Democratic-Republican) 42.5%
Martin Kingsley (Democratic-Republican) 34.2%
Phineas Bruce (Federalist) 7.1%
Nathaniel Drummer (Unknown) 16.2%[7]

Third ballot (April 5, 1802):
Orchard Cook (Democratic-Republican) 45.0%
Martin Kingsley (Democratic-Republican) 32.4%
Phineas Bruce (Federalist) 13.3%
Nathaniel Drummer (Unknown) 9.2%[8]

Fourth ballot (June 7, 1802):
Samuel Thatcher (Federalist) 33.0%
Martin Kingsley (Democratic-Republican) 45.0%
Phineas Bruce (Federalist) 8.3%
Scattering 13.6%[9]

Fifth ballot (July 29, 1802):
New Hampshire at-large Joseph Peirce Federalist 1800 Incumbent resigned sometime in 1802.
New member elected August 30, 1802.
Federalist hold.
New member seated December 6, 1802.
New member also elected, the same day, to the next term, see below.
Mississippi Territory at-large Narsworthy Hunter Democratic-Republican 1801 Incumbent died March 11, 1802.
New delegate elected August 1, 1802.
Democratic-Republican hold.
New delegate seated December 6, 1802.
New member was later re-elected to the next term, see below.
North Carolina 8 Charles Johnson Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent died July 23, 1802.
New member elected October 15, 1802.
Democratic-Republican hold.
New member seated December 7, 1802.
Georgia at-large John Milledge Democratic-Republican 1794 Incumbent resigned May 1802 to become Governor of Georgia.
New member elected December 15, 1802.
Democratic-Republican hold.
New member seated January 10, 1803.

8th Congress

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
New York 7 John Cantine Democratic-Republican 1802 Incumbent resigned before the Congress began.
New member elected April 28, 1803.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Winner was seated October 17, 1803.
Connecticut at-large Elias Perkins Federalist 1800 Incumbent chose not to serve.
New member elected September 5, 1803.
Federalist hold.
Winner was seated October 17, 1803.
  • Green tickY Simeon Baldwin (Federalist) 62.84%
  • William Hart (Democratic-Republican) 36.73%
  • Scattering 0.43%[16]
New York 6 Isaac Bloom Democratic-Republican 1802 Incumbent died April 26, 1803.
New member elected September 16, 1803.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Winner was seated October 17, 1803.
Georgia at-large John Milledge Democratic-Republican 1794 Incumbent chose not to serve, having been elected Governor of Georgia.
New member elected October 3, 1803.
Democratic-Republican hold.
New member seated October 17, 1803.

Connecticut

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[d]
Connecticut at-large
7 seats on a general ticket
John Cotton Smith Federalist 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
Benjamin Tallmadge Federalist 1801 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Samuel W. Dana Federalist 1796 Incumbent re-elected.
Elias Perkins Federalist 1800 Incumbent re-elected but declined to serve, leading to a special election.
Calvin Goddard Federalist 1801 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Roger Griswold Federalist 1794 Incumbent re-elected.
John Davenport Federalist 1798 Incumbent re-elected.

Delaware

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Delaware at-large James A. Bayard Federalist 1796 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.

Georgia

Georgia gained 2 seats in reapportionment after the 1800 census. It elected its representatives October 4, 1802 at-large on a general ticket.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[d]
Georgia at-large
4 seats on a general ticket
John Milledge Democratic-Republican 1801 (Special) Incumbent resigned in May 1802, leading to a December 15, 1802 special election.
Incumbent elected to the next term, but declined the seat, leading to an October 3, 1803 special election.
David Meriwether Democratic-Republican 1802 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
None (Seat created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
None (Seat created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.

Kentucky

Kentucky gained 4 seats to 6 in reapportionment after the 1800 census.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Kentucky 1 Thomas T. Davis Democratic-Republican 1797 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Kentucky 2 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Kentucky 3 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Kentucky 4 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Kentucky 5 John Fowler
Redistricted from the 2nd district
Democratic-Republican 1797 Incumbent re-elected.
Kentucky 6 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.

Maryland

Maryland gained 1 seat in reapportionment after the 1800 census. Rather than increasing the number of districts, however, Maryland made the Maryland 5 a plural district with 2 seats.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[d]
Maryland 1 John Campbell Federalist 1801 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY John Campbell (Federalist) 79.5%
  • William Thomas (Democratic-Republican) 20.5%
Maryland 2 Walter Bowie Democratic-Republican 1802 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Maryland 3 Thomas Plater Federalist 1801 Incumbent re-elected.
Maryland 4 Daniel Hiester Democratic-Republican 1788 (Pennsylvania)
1801
Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Daniel Hiester (Democratic-Republican) 60.0%
  • Eli Williams (Federalist) 40.0%
Maryland 5
Plural district with 2 seats
Samuel Smith Democratic-Republican 1792 Incumbent retired to run for Senate.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican hold.
None (Seat created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Maryland 6 John Archer Democratic-Republican 1801 Incumbent re-elected.
Maryland 7 Joseph H. Nicholson Democratic-Republican 1798 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Maryland 8 John Dennis Federalist 1796 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY John Dennis (Federalist) 94.9%
  • Joshua Prideaux (Democratic-Republican) 3.4%
  • Samuel Heath 1.1%
  • Others 0.7%

Massachusetts

Massachusetts increased 3 seats to 17 in reapportionment after the 1800 census. Massachusetts law at the time required a majority for election to an office, which requirement was not met in the 6th district, requiring two additional ballots.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[d]
Massachusetts 1
"Suffolk district"
William Eustis
Redistricted from the 8th district
Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 2
"Essex South district"
Nathan Read
Redistricted from the 10th district
Federalist 1800 (Special) Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Massachusetts 3
"Essex North district"
Manasseh Cutler
Redistricted from the 11th district
Federalist 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Manasseh Cutler (Federalist) 75.5%
  • Thomas Kitteridge (Democratic-Republican) 21.4%
  • Others 3.1%
Massachusetts 4
"Middlesex district"
Joseph Bradley Varnum
Redistricted from the 9th district
Democratic-Republican 1795 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 5
"Hampshire South district"
William Shepard
Redistricted from the 2nd district
Federalist 1797 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Federalist hold.
  • Green tickY Thomas Dwight (Federalist) 78.0%
  • Samuel Fowler (Democratic-Republican) 9.5%
  • Jonathan Smith (Democratic-Republican) 5.8%
  • Scattering 6.7%
Massachusetts 6
"Hampshire North district"
Ebenezer Mattoon
Redistricted from the 3rd district
Federalist 1800 (Special) Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Federalist hold.
First ballot (November 1, 1802):
Hugh McClallan (Federalist) 29.5%
John Williams (Federalist) 15.2%
Samuel Taggart (Federalist) 14.9%
Solomon Snead (Democratic-Republican) 12.3%
Joseph Lyman (Federalist) 10.1%
Solomon Nose (Federalist) 8.0%
Edward Upham (Democratic-Republican) 5.2%
Zebina Montague 4.8%

Second ballot (January 24, 1803):
Hugh McClallan (Federalist) 36.9%
Samuel Taggart (Federalist) 27.5%
Solomon Snead (Democratic-Republican) 21.2%
John Williams (Federalist) 14.4%

Third ballot (April 3, 1803):
Massachusetts 7
"Plymouth district"
Josiah Smith
Redistricted from the 6th district
Democratic-Republican 1801 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
  • Green tickY Nahum Mitchell (Federalist) 58.3%
  • Henry Warren (Democratic-Republican) 41.6%
Massachusetts 8
"Barnstable district"
Lemuel Williams
Redistricted from the 5th district
Federalist 1799 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 9
"Bristol district"
Phanuel Bishop
Redistricted from the 7th district
Democratic-Republican 1799 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 10
"Worcester South district"
Seth Hastings
Redistricted from the 4th district
Federalist 1801 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Seth Hastings (Federalist) 62.2%
  • Edward Bangs (Democratic-Republican) 37.3%
Massachusetts 11
"Worcester North district"
None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
Massachusetts 12
"Berkshire district"
John Bacon
Redistricted from the 1st district
Democratic-Republican 1801 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Massachusetts 13
"Norfolk district"
None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY Ebenezer Seaver (Democratic-Republican) 65.1%
  • Oliver N. Everett (Federalist) 29.4%
  • Samuel Dexter (Democratic-Republican) 2.8%
  • Benjamin Hitchbourne (Democratic-Republican) 2.8%
Massachusetts 14
"York district," District of Maine
Richard Cutts Democratic-Republican 1801 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Richard Cutts (Democratic-Republican) 52.3%
  • John Lord (Federalist) 44.4%
  • Moses Sweat (Federalist) 3.2%
Massachusetts 15
"Cumberland district," District of Maine
Peleg Wadsworth
Redistricted from the 13th district
Federalist 1793 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 16
"Lincoln district," District of Maine
Samuel Thatcher
Redistricted from the 12th district
Federalist 1802 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 17
"Kennebec district," District of Maine
None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire increased its apportionment from 4 seats to 5 after the 1800 census.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[d]
New Hampshire at-large
5 seats on a general ticket
Samuel Tenney Federalist 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
Vacant. Incumbent Joseph Peirce resigned in 1802.
New member elected.
Federalist hold.
George B. Upham Federalist 1800 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Federalist hold.
Abiel Foster Federalist 1794 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Federalist hold.
None (Seat created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.

New Jersey

New Jersey increased its apportionment from 5 seats to 6 after the 1800 census.

The Federalists did not run any official candidates in 1802, but a few Federalists did receive scattered votes.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
New Jersey at-large
6 seats on a general ticket
John Condit Democratic-Republican 1798 Incumbent retired to run for Senate.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Ebenezer Elmer Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
William Helms Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
James Mott Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
Henry Southard Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
None (Seat created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.

New York

New York's apportionment increased from 10 seats to 17 seats after the 1800 census. The state was subsequently redistricted. 11 open seats were available due to the increase in apportionment and retirement of incumbents.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
New York 1 John Smith Democratic-Republican 1799 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
New York 2 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
New York 3 Samuel L. Mitchill
Redistricted from the 2nd district
Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 4 Philip Van Courtlandt
Redistricted from the 3rd district
Democratic-Republican 1793 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 5 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
New York 6 Theodorus Bailey
Redistricted from the 5th district
Democratic-Republican 1793
1796 (Lost)
1798
1800 (Retired)
1801 (Special)
Incumbent retired to run for U.S. Senator.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY Isaac Bloom (Democratic-Republican) 55.4%
  • Samuel Mott (Federalist) 44.6%
New York 7 Lucas Elmendorf
Redistricted from the 4th district
Democratic-Republican 1796 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY John Cantine (Democratic-Republican) 48.8%
  • Conrad C. Elmendorf (Federalist) 46.3%
  • Conrad E. Elmendorf 4.9%
New York 8 John P. Van Ness
Redistricted from the 6th district
Democratic-Republican 1801 (Special) Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
New York 9 Killian Van Rensselaer
Redistricted from the 8th district
Federalist 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 10 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
New York 11 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY Beriah Palmer (Democratic-Republican) 74.2%
  • Guert Van Schoonhoven (Federalist) 25.8%
New York 12 David Thomas
Redistricted from the 7th district
Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 13 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY Thomas Sammons (Democratic-Republican) 68.3%
  • Robert McFarlan (Federalist) 31.7%
New York 14 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY Erastus Root (Democratic-Republican) 57.4%
  • Benjamin Gilbert (Federalist) 42.8%
New York 15 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
  • Green tickY Gaylord Griswold (Federalist) 53.5%
  • Francis A. Bloodgood (Democratic-Republican) 46.5%
New York 16 Benjamin Walker
Redistricted from the 9th district
Federalist 1800 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
New York 17 Thomas Morris
Redistricted from the 10th district
Federalist 1800 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.

North Carolina

North Carolina increased its apportionment from 10 to 12 seats after the 1800 census.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
North Carolina 1 Thomas Wynns
Redistricted from the 8th district
Democratic-Republican 1802 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
North Carolina 2 Willis Alston
Redistricted from the 9th district
Democratic-Republican 1798 Incumbent re-elected.
North Carolina 3 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
North Carolina 4 John Stanly
Redistricted from the 10th district
Federalist 1800 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
North Carolina 5 William H. Hill
Redistricted from the 6th district
Federalist 1798 Incumbent retired when appointed U.S. District Judge (later withdrawn).
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY James Gillespie (Democratic-Republican) 57.5%
  • Alexander D. Moore (Federalist) 42.5%
North Carolina 6 Nathaniel Macon
Redistricted from the 5th district
Democratic-Republican 1791 Incumbent re-elected.
North Carolina 7 William B. Grove Federalist 1790 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Federalist hold.
Robert Williams
Redistricted from the 3rd district
Democratic-Republican 1796 Incumbent retired to run for Governor of North Carolina.
Democratic-Republican loss.
North Carolina 8 Richard Stanford
Redistricted from the 4th district
Democratic-Republican 1796 Incumbent re-elected.
North Carolina 9 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY Marmaduke Williams (Democratic-Republican) 53.8%
  • Theophilus Lacy (Democratic-Republican) 28.3%
  • William Nash (Democratic-Republican) 15.5%
  • Anton Brown (Federalist) 2.4%
North Carolina 10 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
North Carolina 11 James Holland
Redistricted from the 1st district
Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY James Holland (Democratic-Republican) 70.7%
  • William Tate (Federalist) 29.3%
North Carolina 12 Archibald Henderson
Redistricted from the 2nd district
Federalist 1798 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.

Ohio

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[d]
Ohio at-large Ohio is considered to have been admitted to the Union near the end of the 7th Congress,[f] but did not elect representatives until the 8th Congress. For this reason, Ohio is considered to have had a vacant seat in the House and two vacant seats in the Senate in the 7th Congress.[4] New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania increased its apportionment from 13 to 18 seats after the 1800 census. The state was re-districted from 12 into 11 districts, four of which were plural districts.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[21]
Pennsylvania 1
Plural district with 3 seats
William Jones Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican hold.
None (Seat created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Michael Leib
Redistricted from the 2nd district
Democratic-Republican 1798 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 2
Plural district with 3 seats
Robert Brown
Redistricted from the 4th district
Democratic-Republican 1798 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
None (Seat created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Isaac Van Horne
Redistricted from the 4th district
Democratic-Republican 1801 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 3
Plural district with 3 seats
Joseph Hemphill Federalist 1800 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Joseph Hiester
Redistricted from the 5th district
Democratic-Republican 1797 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Thomas Boude
Redistricted from the 7th district
Federalist 1800 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Pennsylvania 4
Plural district with 2 seats
John A. Hanna
Redistricted from the 6th district
Democratic-Republican 1796 Incumbent re-elected.
None (Seat created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Pennsylvania 5 Andrew Gregg
Redistricted from the 9th district
Democratic-Republican 1791 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 6 John Stewart
Redistricted from the 8th district
Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY John Stewart (Democratic-Republican) 56.7%
  • John Edie (Federalist) 43.3%
Pennsylvania 7 Henry Woods
Redistricted from the 10th district
Federalist 1798 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY John Rea (Democratic-Republican) 66.6%
  • Henry Woods (Federalist) 28.9%
  • John McLene (Democratic-Republican) 4.5%
Pennsylvania 8 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY William Findley (Democratic-Republican) 53.9%
  • Jacob Painter (Democratic-Republican) 46.1%
Pennsylvania 9 John Smilie
Redistricted from the 11th district
Democratic-Republican 1792
1798
Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 10 William Hoge
Redistricted from the 12th district
Democratic-Republican 1801 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 11 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY John Lucas (Democratic-Republican) 48.9%
  • John Wilkins (Federalist) 36.7%
  • Alexander Foster (Federalist) 14.4%

Rhode Island

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Rhode Island at-large
2 seats on a general ticket
Thomas Tillinghast Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Joseph Stanton Jr. Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.

South Carolina

South Carolina increased its apportionment from 6 seats to 8 after the 1800 census.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
South Carolina 1
"Charleston district"
Thomas Lowndes Federalist 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
South Carolina 2
"Beaufort and Edgefield district"
John Rutledge Jr. Federalist 1796 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
William Butler Sr.
Redistricted from the 5th district
Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
South Carolina 3
"Georgetown district"
Benjamin Huger Federalist 1798 Incumbent re-elected.
South Carolina 4
"Orangeburgh district"
None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY Wade Hampton (Democratic-Republican) 50.9%
  • John Taylor (Federalist) 49.1%
South Carolina 5
"Sumter district"
Richard Winn
Redistricted from the 4th district
Democratic-Republican 1802 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
South Carolina 6
"Abbeville district"
None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
  • Green tickY Levi Casey (Democratic-Republican) 43.5%
  • John Calhoun (Democratic-Republican) 29.8%
  • Robert Creswell (Federalist) 14.1%
  • James Saxon (Federalist) 10.3%
  • Benjamin Herndon (Federalist) 2.4%
South Carolina 7
"Chester district"
Thomas Moore
Redistricted from the 6th district
Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent re-elected.
South Carolina 8
"Pendleton district"
None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.

Tennessee

Tennessee increased its apportionment from 1 seat to 3 seats after the 1800 census.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Tennessee at-large
3 seats on a general ticket
William Dickson Democratic-Republican 1801 Incumbent re-elected.
None (Seat created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
None (Seat created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.

Vermont

Vermont increased its apportionment from 2 seats to 4 after the 1800 census. Vermont law at the time required a majority of votes to win an office, which frequently necessitated additional ballots.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[d]
Vermont 1
"Southwest district"
Israel Smith Democratic-Republican 1791
1797 (Lost)
1800
Incumbent retired to run for U.S. Senator.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Vermont 2
"Southeast district"
Lewis R. Morris Federalist 1797 (Special) Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Federalist hold.
First ballot (December 13, 1802):
Lewis R. Morris (Federalist) 45.6%
James Elliot (Federalist) 42.7%
Paul Brigham (Democratic-Republican) 5.4%
Amasa Paine (Federalist) 2.9%
Others 3.4%

Second ballot (March 1, 1803):
Vermont 3
"Northeast district"
None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
Vermont 4
"Northwest district"
None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
First ballot (December 13, 1802):
Udney Hay (Democratic-Republican) 45.3%
Martin Chittenden (Federalist) 28.2%
Amos Marsh (Federalist) 19.6%
Daniel Chipman (Federalist) 2.3%
William C. Harrington (Federalist) 1.9%
Others 2.7%

Second ballot (March 1, 1803):
Udney Hay (Democratic-Republican) 49.2%
Martin Chittenden (Federalist) 29.8%
Amos Marsh (Federalist) 19.9%
Others 1.1%

Third ballot (May 9, 1803):

Virginia

Virginia increased its apportionment from 19 to 22 seats after the 1800 census. Virginia's congressional delegation remained the largest of any state, but would lose this distinction permanently after the Census of 1810. Elections were held over three days in April 1803.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Virginia 1 George Jackson
Redistricted from the 3rd district
Democratic-Republican 1795
1797 (Lost)
1799
Incumbent retired.
New member (incumbent's son) elected.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Virginia 2 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
Virginia 3 John Smith
Redistricted from the 1st district
Democratic-Republican 1801 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY John Smith (Democratic-Republican) 89.9%
  • Joseph Sexton (Democratic-Republican) 10.1%
Virginia 4 David Holmes
Redistricted from the 2nd district
Democratic-Republican 1797 Incumbent re-elected.
Virginia 5 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
Results were subsequently challenged and overturned.[i]
Virginia 6 Abram Trigg
Redistricted from the 4th district
Democratic-Republican 1797 Incumbent re-elected.
Virginia 7 Richard Brent
Redistricted from the 17th district
Democratic-Republican 1801 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
Virginia 8 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Virginia 9 Philip R. Thompson
Redistricted from the 18th district
Democratic-Republican 1793 Incumbent re-elected.
Virginia 10 John Dawson
Redistricted from the 15th district
Democratic-Republican 1797 Incumbent re-elected.
Virginia 11 Anthony New
Redistricted from the 16th district
Democratic-Republican 1793 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Anthony New (Democratic-Republican) 71.4%
  • John Taylor (Federalist) 28.6%
Virginia 12 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Federalist gain.
Virginia 13 John J. Trigg
Redistricted from the 5th district
Democratic-Republican 1797 Incumbent re-elected.
Virginia 14 Matthew Clay
Redistricted from the 6th district
Democratic-Republican 1797 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Matthew Clay (Democratic-Republican) 88.9%
  • James Hurt (Federalist) 11.1%
Virginia 15 John Randolph
Redistricted from the 7th district
Democratic-Republican 1799 Incumbent re-elected.
Virginia 16 William B. Giles
Redistricted from the 9th district
Democratic-Republican 1790 (Special)
1798 (Resigned)
1801
Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Virginia 17 Thomas Claiborne
Redistricted from the 8th district
Democratic-Republican 1793
1801
Incumbent re-elected.
Virginia 18 None (District created) New seat.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Virginia 19 Edwin Gray
Redistricted from the 10th district
Democratic-Republican 1799 Incumbent re-elected.
John Taliaferro Democratic-Republican 1801 Incumbent retired.
Democratic-Republican loss.
Virginia 20 Thomas Newton Jr.
Redistricted from the 11th district
Democratic-Republican 1799 Incumbent re-elected.
Virginia 21 Samuel J. Cabell
Redistricted from the 14th district
Democratic-Republican 1795 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Virginia 22 John Clopton
Redistricted from the 13th district
Democratic-Republican 1801 Incumbent re-elected.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Majority required for election, which requirement was not met in one district, necessitating two additional trials held on January 24 and April 3, 1803
  2. ^ Majority required for election, which was not met in two districts. Two additional elections were required to achieve a majority, held on March 1 and May 9, 1803
  3. ^ Mistakenly listed as a Federalist in source
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Only candidates with at least 1% of the vote listed
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Numbers of votes missing or incomplete in source
  6. ^ The official date when Ohio became a state was not set until 1953, when the 83rd Congress passed legislation retroactively designating the date of the first meeting of the Ohio state legislature, March 1, 1803, as that date. However, on April 30, 1802 the 7th Congress had passed an act "authorizing the inhabitants of Ohio to form a Constitution and state government, and admission of Ohio into the Union."[19] On February 19, 1803, the same Congress passed an act "providing for the execution of the laws of the United States in the State of Ohio."[20] The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress states that Ohio was admitted to the Union on November 29, 1802, and counts its seats as vacant from that date.
  7. ^ Former delegate for the Northwest Territory
  8. ^ Changed parties
  9. ^ Thomas Lewis Jr. (Federalist) was initially declared the winner with 1,004 votes for Lewis, 832 for Andrew Moore (Democratic-Republican), and 423 for John Woodward (Federalist). However, upon investigation by the House Committee on Elections, it was determined that 355 votes for Lewis and 124 votes for Moore were cast by individuals who did not meet Virginia's voter qualifications, making the adjusted totals 708 legal votes for Moore and 649 legal votes for Lewis, thus, the Committee awarded this seat to Moore on March 5, 1804.[22]
  10. ^ Only the two top candidates listed here, partial returns suggest Jones won by a very large majority.

References

  1. ^ Stat. 128
  2. ^ Stat. 175
  3. ^ "MD District 2". March 9, 2004. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  4. ^ a b "Seventh Congress (membership roster)" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on December 6, 2014. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  5. ^ "SC District 06 - Special Election". December 8, 2005. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  6. ^ "MA - 1st Eastern - Special Election - 1st Trial". April 16, 2011. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  7. ^ "MA - 1st Eastern - Special Election - 2nd Trial". April 16, 2011. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  8. ^ "MA - 1st Eastern - Special Election - 3rd Trial". April 16, 2011. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  9. ^ "MA - 1st Eastern - Special Election - 4th Trial". April 16, 2011. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  10. ^ "MA - 1st Eastern - Special Election - 5th Trial". April 16, 2011. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  11. ^ "NH At-Large - Special Election". January 4, 2011. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  12. ^ "MS Territorial Delegate - Special Election". May 21, 2006. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  13. ^ "NC District 08 - Special Election". February 5, 2005. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  14. ^ "Georgia 1802 U.S. House of Representatives, Special". A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts Digital Library, Tufts University. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  15. ^ "NY District 7". April 8, 2006. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  16. ^ "Connecticut 1803 U.S. House of Representatives, Special". A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts Digital Library, Tufts University. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  17. ^ "NY District 6". April 8, 2006. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  18. ^ "GA At-Large". January 29, 2018. Retrieved September 14, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  19. ^ Sess. 1, ch. 40, 2 Stat. 173
  20. ^ Sess. 2, ch. 7, 2 Stat. 201
  21. ^ Wilkes University Elections Statistics Project
  22. ^ "A New Nation Votes: American Elections Returns 1787-1825: Virginia 1803 House of Representatives District 5". Archived from the original on 2013-01-06.

Bibliography

External links

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