To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

162nd New York State Legislature

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

162nd New York State Legislature
161st 163rd
The facade of the New York State Capitol building in bright daylight
Overview
JurisdictionNew York, United States
TermJanuary 1, 1939 – December 31, 1940
Senate
Members51
PresidentLt. Gov. Charles Poletti (D)
Temporary PresidentPerley A. Pitcher (R), until February 20, 1939;
Joe R. Hanley (R), from February 27, 1939
Party controlRepublican (27–24)
Assembly
Members150
SpeakerOswald D. Heck (R)
Party controlRepublican (85–64–1)
Sessions
1stJanuary 4 – May 20, 1939
2ndJune 23 – July 10, 1939
3rdJanuary 3 – March 31, 1940
4thOctober 22, 1940 –

The 162nd New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 4, 1939, to October 22, 1940, during the seventh and eight years of Herbert H. Lehman's governorship, in Albany.

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/3
    Views:
    2 418
    419
    1 289
  • Syracuse University 162nd Commencement
  • Gainesville, Florida
  • Syracuse University College of Law - Commencement 2016

Transcription

Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to the 162nd Commencement of Syracuse University. >> This morning degrees will be conferred on candidates who have qualified for associate's, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees, and those qualified to receive certificates of advanced studies. More than 5,000 students will participate in today's Commencement ceremony. >> The degree candidates procession, entering at the left front, is led by two class marshals of the Syracuse University Class of 2016, Alexis Pena and Tatiana Williams. They have been chosen by an all-University committee sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs to have the distinct honor of leading their classmates on this significant and memorable day. Walking just behind them are the Syracuse University Scholars. These undergraduate students of the Class of 2016 have been named University Scholars because of their academic excellence and scholarly achievements. They received the nomination of their respective schools and colleges and were selected by a committee of the University Senate. Their names are in your program. You will note that this year Syracuse University celebrates its 162nd Commencement, despite the fact that the University is 145 years old. Founded in 1870, the first commencement was held in 1872. However, during and just after World War II, Syracuse University opened its doors to the returning veterans, who attended in great numbers. Multiple commencements were held during those years until 1952, when the University returned to the tradition of holding one commencement in the spring. The candidates for advanced degrees are next in the procession. The first group consists of those who will receive doctoral degrees this morning. The banners, which you will see carried by the student marshals of each school, symbolize the schools and colleges that make up Syracuse University. The banner preceding the doctoral candidates is that of the Graduate School. The Graduate School offers over 200 degree programs among its 10 schools and colleges and awards approximately 1,600 Master's degrees each year. Since its founding, the Graduate School has been a leader in quality graduate education among its peers in higher education. Now, ladies and gentlemen, entering at the right is the marshal and recent graduate representing the Syracuse University College of Law. The law students' degrees were conferred this past Friday. Vice President Joseph Biden gave the keynote address to the candidates and their families. The College of Law was founded in 1895 and is home to interdisciplinary programs, experiential learning opportunities, and innovative centers and institutes. The college remains focused on student success and preparing the next generation of great legal practitioners. Entering at the right are candidates for the Certificate of Advanced Studies, the Master of Arts, the Master of Fine Arts, the Master of Science, and Master's degrees in professional fields from the Graduate School. Within this group are candidates from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Maxwell is recognized as one of the world's best graduate schools of public affairs and offers undergraduate programs in the social sciences. You will note the variety of colors on the hoods of the advanced degree candidates and, of course, each has a meaning. For example, those candidates wearing hoods of white did their graduate work in the Arts and Letters; those wearing golden yellow studied in the Sciences. The institution of learning, in this instance, Syracuse University, is signified by the color of the lining of the hood. Orange is the official Syracuse University color. You will find a summary of the meaning of the caps, gowns, and hoods worn today under the heading Academic Heraldry in the back of your program. Undergraduate degrees will be presented to students who have qualified in the University's several schools and colleges. Because the groups appear in the procession according to the age of their respective colleges, those from the College of Arts and Sciences are first, now entering at your left. As the liberal arts college at the center of a major research institution, the College of Arts and Sciences stands as the intellectual heart and soul of Syracuse University, providing a highly-personalized academic experience. With more than 50 majors in mathematics, the sciences, the social sciences via the Maxwell School, and the humanities, the College prepares each student for success as a citizen of the world through disciplinary and interdisciplinary teaching and learning, research, scholarship, and service on campus and around the world. When Syracuse University was founded in 1870, the focus of the new institution of higher learning was local and regional. Today the focus is both national and international with a diverse student body coming from each of the 50 states and more than 100 countries. The flags you see on the floor of the Dome represent the homes of all our students. In particular is the flag of the Great State of New York. This year marks the 30th anniversary of former New York Governor Mario M. Cuomo's inspiring and memorable commencement address to the Class of 1986. Today we remember Governor Cuomo, who passed away on New Years Day 2015. Finally, included is the flag of Haudenosaunee Confederacy. We acknowledge with respect to the Onondaga Nation, the indigenous people whose ancestral lands we now stand on. The next group to enter the arena at your right is comprised of the candidates from the College of Visual and Performing Arts. The College of Visual and Performing Arts traces its history back to 1873 and is proudly the first college of fine arts in the country to award a four-year degree. After rigorous study and practice in art, design, drama, music, transmedia, or communication and rhetorical studies, SU VPA students graduate to become cultural leaders who innovate, inspire, and push boundaries. Degree candidates from the College of Engineering and Computer Science are now entering at your left. Students and faculty in Syracuse University's College of Engineering and Computer Science apply critical thinking skills to design and develop the computational and engineering solutions to achieve a higher quality of life for all. Collaborating across disciplines, they lead efforts in building a safer, healthier, and more sustainable world. On your right, baccalaureate degree candidates from the School of Education begin their march. The School of Education, a national leader in inclusive urban education, prepares leaders to transform education. The School is committed to improving and informing educational practice for diverse communities. The School of Education pioneered the inclusion movement in the United States, making way for all learners to participate fully in mainstream classrooms and other inclusive learning environments. Entering at your left are the candidates to receive bachelor's degrees from the School of Information Studies. The School of Information Studies is the original information school, with a vision to expand human capabilities through information, and transform the information field through leadership in research, development, and education. Now entering on your right are the candidates from the Martin J. Whitman School of Management. The School's entrepreneurship and supply chain management programs are consistently ranked among the top in the country, and Whitman's emphasis on experiential learning distinguishes its graduates in the marketplace. Whitman is also renowned for its globally diverse MBA programs, both traditional and online. And now, ladies and gentlemen, to your left the procession continues with the degree candidates from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. The Newhouse School is the country's leading school of communications, with majors spanning virtually every known form of information dissemination. Newhouse students graduating today become part of the school's strong and loyal alumni network, which includes some of the most powerful and successful communications professionals in the world. Now beginning their procession at your right are the candidates for the baccalaureate degree from the School of Architecture. The Syracuse University School of Architecture was founded in 1873 and is consistently ranked among the best schools of architecture in the nation. The School provides a highly innovative learning environment, leading the effort to make a better world through the design of better buildings and cities. Entering on your right to take their seats are the degree candidates from the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. The programs within this college are the School of Social Work, the Department of Child & Family Studies, the Department of Marriage and Family Therapy, the Department of Public Health, Food Studies and Nutrition and the Department of Sport Management. Next on your left is the University College banner, carried by a marshal who Represents a wide-ranging contingency of graduates. University College was established in 1918 to provide support and services to a diverse population of students studying part time. UC is the home of the Bachelor of Profession Studies degree and partners with the schools and colleges across campus to provide access to all those seeking a Syracuse University degree. Completing the procession on your left, the degree candidates from the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry are now entering the arena. Leading their procession are the college marshals. Three scholars of the graduating class follow the marshals. The scholars were chosen on the basis of their exceptional academic achievement. You will find the names of these marshals and scholars in your program. ESF is one of the nation's top-ranked environmental colleges. It is the oldest and largest college in the country devoted exclusively to the study of the environment. Now, ladies and gentlemen, with the candidates assembled, the academic procession is about to begin. Ladies and gentlemen, the academic procession will continue from your left front. The mace bearer will lead the groups of newly retired emeriti faculty, the faculty from the schools and colleges, the University's administrative staff, the Chancellor's executive team, the academic deans, and the members of the Syracuse University and State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry Board of Trustees. The charter mace is carried by Nancy Weatherly Sharp, Professor Emerita of Newspaper Journalism in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. First to follow are the newly appointed emeriti faculty, those who begin their retirement from active teaching and will be recognized later in today's ceremony. Walking immediately behind these honored teachers are fellow emeriti faculty, current faculty members, and members of the University's administrative staff. Following the faculty procession are the members of the Chancellor's Executive Team, which is composed of senior-level advisors and administrators. In the next group are the deans of the University's schools and colleges, and the deans from other divisions within the University. Maurice Harris, Dean of Undergraduate Admissions David Seaman, Dean of Libraries Rebecca Reed Kantrowitz, Senior Vice President and Dean of the Division of Student Affairs William Banks, Interim Dean of the College of Law Joanna Masingila, Dean of the School of Education Jeffrey Stanton, Interim Dean of the School of Information Studies Theresa Dahlberg, Dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Science Kenneth Kavajecz, Dean of the Martin J. Whitman School of Management Ann Clarke, Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts Michael Speaks, Dean of the School of Architecture James Steinberg, Dean of the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs Bea Gonzalez, Dean of University College And Peter Vanable, Interim Dean of the Graduate School And now entering the arena are the Trustees of Syracuse University. The Board of Trustees is the governing body of the University, responsible for the educational mission and fiscal policies of the University. Members of the Board guide the University toward its goals and vision and serve the public trust. Concluding the academic procession is the Chancellor's party entering on your left. Leading this group are: Shiu-Kai Chin, University Marshal, Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor for Teaching Excellence and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Computer Science. Kelly Chandler-Olcott, Associate University Marshal, Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor for Teaching Excellence and Professor and Chair of Reading and Language Arts in the School of Education. Andria Costello Staniec, Associate Professor, Associate Provost of Academic Affairs. The University marshals are followed by: Samuel Clemence, Interim Dean of Hendricks Chapel. Mark Verone, Class of '95, President of the Syracuse University Alumni Association. Next are the deans who are presenting their Honorary Degree Recipients. Lorraine Branham, Dean of the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. Diane Lyden Murphy, Dean of the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. Karin Ruhlandt, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Those deans are followed by the honorary degree recipients. They are: Kevin J. Bell, receiving an honorary Doctor of Science. Floyd D. Little, being awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Tobias Wolff, receiving an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Following the honorary degree recipients are the final members of the Chancellor's group. Quentin Wheeler, President of the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Vita Demarchi, Chair of the Board of Trustees of the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Steven Barnes, Chairman of the Syracuse University Board of Trustees. Donald E. Newhouse, an honorary degree recipient being presented a Doctor of Letters, Honoris Causa, and our 2016 Commencement speaker. Elizabeth Liddy, Interim Vice Chancellor and Provost of Syracuse University. And Kent Syverud, Chancellor and President of Syracuse University. Appointed by the University's Board of Trustees in January 2014, Chancellor Syverud is the 12th leader of the University since its founding in 1870. Will members of the audience who can, please rise for the presentation of the colors. The Color Guard now moving into place is composed of members of the Army and Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps at Syracuse University. Ladies and gentlemen, the academic procession is complete. The 162nd Commencement of Syracuse University is about to begin. >> Chancellor Syverud, by authorization of the Board of Trustees and the University faculty, I declare the 162nd Commencement of Syracuse University. to be in session. . [Applause] . Good morning, everyone. . I am Liz Liddy, Interim Vice Chancellor and Provost of Syracuse University. It is my privilege to welcome you here today. We ask that you remain standing for the invocation and the National Anthem. The invocation will be given by Samuel Clemence, Interim Dean of Hendricks Chapel. . >> Let us pray. We gather this day to celebrate and honor the collective achievements of our students and scholars, family and friends. As we celebrate, may we be ever mindful of those who supported us. for loyal friends and loving families, we give thanks. For patient teachers and demanding challenges, we give thanks. Poised between the past and the future, we come with gratitude for all that has led us here. For friendships made and laughter shared, for challenges faced, failures survived and hope renewed, we give thanks. In this moment renew in us the deeply-held values we nurtured here as we prepare ourselves to be engaged, global citizens united in our goal of creating a better, more just world. Amen. >> The National Anthem will be led by Kirsten Ariel Marsh, who is receiving a master of music, vocal performance from the College of Visual and Performing Arts. Oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming and the rockets' red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there oh, say does that star-spangled banner yet wave o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave. . [Applause] . >> Please be seated. Ladies and gentlemen, I have the great pleasure of introducing the 12th Chancellor and President of Syracuse University, Kent Syverud. . [Applause] . >> Welcome, everyone. Graduates, faculty, staff, alumni, trustees, family, friends, welcome to the Class of 2016 Syracuse University Commencement. . I will be followed in this welcome and fair well by the outstanding president of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry my friend Quentin Wheeler. This is a happy day. Each of you who are graduating today got here because of your own hard work, each of you who are graduating today also got here because of so many people who have faith in you. Some of those people, faculty and staff are sitting in front of you and working all around this Dome and outside of it. Some of the people who the support you and have faith in you, friends, family, classmates, are right behind you, are seated next to you, where once again as always, they have your back. Some of the people who have supported you and are watching this ceremony through the webcast are all around the world. I thank every single person here in the Dome or around the world who helped each of you arrive at this glorious day. Syracuse University is full of dedicated faculty and staff and alumni and trustees who give their hearts and their souls for this place and especially for the students in it. These are people who are there when you need them. There are many such people here today, some of whom are retiring from positions as you graduate. They include interim Provost Liz Liddy, Dean Ann Clarke of the College of Visual and Performing Arts, Dean James Steinberg of the Maxwell School, Interim Dean Stanton of the iSchool, and the incomparable Floyd Little. Please join me in thanking all of them. . [Applause] . Class of 2016, as you graduate from Syracuse today in front of all these luminaries, I would ask you to reflect on one person. Otto. . Otto is our mascot. . Otto is an Orange. . Otto has three important thing to say to you. First, Otto is unique and that is just fine. . Some about people would say Otto is fat. Some people would say Otto is is a fruit. Some people would say Otto has no clear gender. . Does that mean Otto is not part of us and Otto does not help define us? No. If I have learned one thing about you, the graduates of the Class of 2016, is that the only thing that is truly normal about a Syracuse student is that every single one of you is unique. That is what is so wonderful about this sprawling idiosyncratic and inspiring place, there is no one normal, other than that at our best each of us can be unique. So now you go out into that cold world, some days you will look at yourself in the mirror or you will look at a new co-worker or someone you meet and you will find yourself seeing someone who is fat or strange or different. At that moment I want you to stop and think of Otto, I want you to say that's Otto, Otto is just a part of who we are at our best. . Second -- [Applause] . Second, Otto has a disability and that is just fine. As all of you know, Otto cannot talk. Otto never talks. Even when someone drops a keg of beer on Otto's foot, which I have seen -- No words come out. . Just because Otto cannot talk doesn't mean that Otto cannot do things. Of course not. Otto is the everywhere, an integral part of this place, not really a mascot at all, but part of our spirit. Otto can't talk, but Otto somehow speaks for us all in victory and in defeat. So now you go out into that cold world, please remember that a warm Syracuse at its best didn't just include someone with disabilities, Syracuse embraced someone with a disability and empowered that person with a disability to make us better. . [Applause] . We all have our secret and not so secret challenges, some of them do not show on the outside. They may not rise to the level of disability, but we can let them hold us back just the same. . I have several. I have a deep irrational anxiety about speaking in public. . This is really true. But at Syracuse I just look to Otto. Otto can't speak and yet Otto runs out in front of 30,000 people in the Dome and ten people at a local pancake breakfast every day, Otto just does the job which is usually to make people better. Whatever your challenge, whatever your disability, please remember Otto. . Third, and finally, underneath Otto's skin, Otto's peel, there is a decent human being. One of the joy of my job is that once in a very long while I get to do something that nobody else at the University gets to do. This year I asked to meet Otto. Not the mascot, but the human being underneath. . And when I did, I discovered that Otto is really a group of selfless students just like you. They have majors and jobs and dreams and challenges and disabilities. They are members of teams and churches and clubs and societies. And on top of everything else they do, they go out there every day and smile as Otto. They hug a kid, they lead a cheer, they help out. Otto it turns out is like each of you, so much of this place was driven by similar groups of selfless students, from SU ambulance to zanbonie revolution, from student association to University union. So now you go out into the cold world, remember that this place was made so much better when you did something extra beyond your regular job with a group of selfless colleagues. You can do that in the world too and make it more like Syracuse. Class of 2016, Otto is graduating today. I mean that literally, sitting among you looking just like you in cap and gown are selfless students who were Otto. But I also mean that everybody who is graduating today is Otto to me. Even though you look the same right now in cap and gown, I know that underneath that skin is a wonderful unique person who can, like Otto, show kindness to strangers and sometimes thereby entertain Angels without knowing it. Class of 2016, whatever you look like on the outside, we at Syracuse will always remember one thing: Including when you are in need or when you have a triumph or a tragedy, every single one of you, whatever you look like on the outside, whatever you were born with, whatever you have become, as far as we all are are concerned, your peel will forever be Orange. Thank you and farewell! . [Applause] . >> Good morning. From ESF, the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and its faculty, staff, students, and trustees,. I bring congratulations to the Syracuse University Class of 2016. You are receiving degrees today from one of the world's great universities. And whether you are headed next to further studies or to make your mark in the "real world," your Syracuse education has prepared you for success. Robert Orben described a graduation ceremony as an event where the Commencement speaker tells thousands of students dressed in identical caps and gowns that individuality is the key to success. Well, there you are, and here I am. Always trust yourself. Your instincts. Your Syracuse education. It is your unique combination of passions, dreams, experiences, knowledge and skills that will lead you to define success on your own terms. That, and a few good recommendation letters. So tell the faculty how great they were at the reception. I conferred degrees upon ESF graduates yesterday at our College's Commencement exercises. I want to take a moment to ask the ESF graduates to rise so we can congratulate them too. . [Applause] . Thank you. Please be seated. . We join you today to celebrate also the many wonderful connections between our Two great institutions. . From shared instruction to collaborative research, community impact, and student activities, the synergies between SU and ESF have fantastic results. The best of which sit before us today. It has been said that the optimist is the person who believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds and that the pessimist is the person who is afraid That they're right. . Be optimistic because the world is filled with beauty and possibilities. But be a little pessimistic, too. You can always make the world better, and we are counting on you to do it. Congratulations, Class of 2016! . [Applause] . >> I am pleased to introduce Mark Verone, Class of 1994, President of the Syracuse University Alumni Association. . [Applause] . >> Thank you. It is my honor on behalf of more than 250,000 Syracuse University alumni around the world to welcome you as the newest members of the Syracuse University Alumni Association. You are now part of Generation Orange, Syracuse University's graduates of the last ten years. Welcome to our alumni family. [Applause] My name is Mark Verone, and I'm a 1995 graduate of the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. As I was reflecting on what to say today, it occurred to me that 21 years ago I was sitting right, probably over there, and I was listening to a lot of older, wiser folks spreading their wisdom to yet another graduating class. . When you're over 40 you get labeled old. At least that is what my 4-year-old tells me. there have been 161 of these ceremonies prior to today. Think about that. Think about what this day means. I admit it never crossed my mind as a 21-year-old graduate that I would be one of those "older people" standing on this stage speaking at Commencement. At the time I was panicking about getting a job and starting my own life after college. I was not thinking about the value of our Orange family and all of my Orange connections. It wasn't until I started making those Orange connections that I realized how special and important this Orange bond is between all alumni and what it means to be a graduate of Syracuse University. We all share this common Orange bond. It's a safety blanket and it is always your home. We all shared the SU student experience, and this alumni bond is incredibly powerful. No matter where I go in this world, there is so much joy when I meet a fellow alum. No matter the age difference, we relate because of the Orange bond. For the past two decades, I've seen the magic of alumni interacting with each other and with our Alma Mater. In fact, many of the people sitting on this stage have their names attached to scholarships, classrooms, and buildings across our campus. Their generosity to Syracuse comes from a desire to maintain this Orange bond. They've chosen to stay connected, to stay engaged, and to give back to this institution. I hope that all of you will do the same so that the next generation will have the same opportunities for success as you've had. So I ask: How will you leave your mark? How will you stay connected to Syracuse? Perhaps you'll join one of our 70-plus alumni clubs and groups around the world. Maybe you'll tune in to the new alumni webinar series we just launched with Career Services. Or you'll consider helping the office of admissions to identify the next generation of students. Wherever you go, we hope you continue to bleed Orange, and please show your Orange pride, especially on social media. . Again, on behalf of the Syracuse University Alumni Association, congratulations and welcome to the Syracuse University alumni family. I hope to see all of you back on campus in September for Orange Central. . [Applause] . >> Thank you, President Verone. According to a tradition at Syracuse University, 12 remarkable young men and women of the Class of 2016 have been selected by a committee of the University Senate and named University Scholars. Their academic excellence and scholarly achievements are an inspiration to all of Us and bring distinction to this University. . Kaitlyn Hobson, from S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications/ College of Arts and Sciences will deliver remarks on behalf of the Class of 2016. >> Distinguished guests, emotional parents, aunts and uncles who cannot believe Syracuse is still this cold, and people who accidentally wandered in here thinking there was a basketball game - Welcome. Class of 2016, you've navigated many different obstacles to get here. But since we got here, I would like to point out one obstacle we all navigated together. During our time at Syracuse University, we have trekked through 485-inches of snow. . [Applause] . That's nearly 40 feet of snow in four years. 40 feet of snow in four years means the one thing we all have in common is that we have fallen down and gotten back up a lot. . Freshmen year I lived in BBB. , it was the first day of spring semester classes and I took the law building stairs home. . I landed on an icy step and became a human super-ball, bouncing down the stairs. A nice guy at the bottom looked over me, helping me up as I simultaneously laughed and cried. He asked if I was okay and said quite seriously, pay attention to where you step. . So, Class of 2016, where were you the first time the Syracuse weather took you down? And do you remember who helped you back up? . I've seen many of you fall. On the slushy floor in Bird Library. Down East Adams hill during sorority recruitment, outside Chucks and for some strange reason inside Chucks, I have seen some graceful falls where people do a half split and then from the window at the daily Orange I would watch as some of you plummeted down the brick hill on Clarendon street, the falls are are all different, but the scene afterward is almost always same. Someone helps you up. Maybe it's your friend or a complete stranger or yourself. You laugh, then you pay attention to where you step. You move a bit lighter. . I have to thank physical plant for working so hard to ensure our safety. They're the incredibly dedicated staff in charge of snow removal and salting. You do an outstanding job. But I also have to thank you for bolstering my metaphor, because no matter how fancy your snowplow, no matter how much salt you throw on our path, we're still going to fall. . Over the last four years I've come to understand a few things about life from watching all of us fall down and get back up. I have come to understand that we learn to appreciate the people who are most valuable to us when we fall. The people who help us back up and those who will do almost anything to keep us from falling again. . I've also come to understand that how you get back up is important. It's all about the recovery. As we've seen watching our men's and women's basketball teams. When you fall, you become a bit less afraid of it happening again because you know you will get back up. Over the last four years after my freshman year wipe out a few more times, I fell in love with a dust sweet smell of old newspapers in the daily orange house, I fell in love with this campus while looking up at the tolling Setnor School of Music in a snowstorm, I fell in love with my majors, mostly though I fell in love with all of you. All of the people here who kept helping me back up. . Most of us will now begin to move away from Syracuse. Our days of trudging through 40 feet of snow may be over. But we will continue to fall. Sometimes it will be quick, sometimes embarrassing, and sometimes even dangerous. But we have to get back up. We get back up because we have gotten up before. We keep going because our family, our friends, and Syracuse University have given us the emotional, intellectual, and spiritual resources to get back up. Class of 2016, congratulations, and pay attention to where you step. . [Applause] . >> I am deeply honored to introduce Donald Newhouse as our Commencement speaker. He is a giant in print and digital communications. He has established an international reputation as a leader of America's largest privately held chain of newspapers. After attending Syracuse 65 years ago, Donald maintained a strong and passionate relationship with his Alma Mater. His father had the vision and selflessness to help create our S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. The original building designed by Pei, one of the great architects of the world, dedicated in 1964 by president Johnson. To this day, Donald and his family are deeply involved as this school stays true to its mission, their generosity and bold vision allow the Newhouse School to build Newhouse 3. Communication students from around the world aspire to study at Newhouse and to carry the Newhouse name. The Newhouse mission retains a clear and singular beauty, to seek and to share the truth. Beyond our campus Donald Newhouse has deep and lasting ties to the greater Syracuse community. We share in his grief over the passing last year of his wife Susan, she was a native of Syracuse and an unforgettable humanitarian, the opportunity it know Donald, fully appreciate his perspective and humility has been one of the joy of my time as Chancellor. Syracuse University was not just a stop in Donald's life, it represents and helped form an ethic that brought him to this day. Our great hope is that each of today's graduates will carry a similar spirit into the world and will manifest Donald's enduring dignity and wisdom. On behalf of Syracuse University, it's my great to welcome Donald Newhouse. . [Applause] . >> I am proud that a Newhouse graduate was selected student speaker, but Kaitlyn, you sure are a hard act to follow. . [Applause] . Thank you, Chancellor Syverud, for your kind words, but I need to correct one thing. A giant I am not. . Good about morning, trustees, Deans, members of the faculty, families of the graduates, and an especially good morning to graduates. . I grew up in the newspaper business. One of the greats of my newspaper world, the late Salsburger of the New York Times once told me a universal truth which I am happy to share with you today, and I quote, there is no such thing as a too short speech. . [Applause] . Happily for you I've taken that dictum to the heart. But this occasion, which I know has special meaning for you, has great meaning for me too. . I arrived at Syracuse as a freshman in 1947. And while I did not achieve what you have, it took me 69 years to get a degree, I am extremely moved to be here alongside you today and if you will indulge me, I'd like to tell you something about good fortune and its opposite, something about love and loss, and what it is taught me. . I was not an especially self confident young man. I came to Syracuse largely because my visionary and highly creative brother, sy, my lifelong partner and closest friend came a couple of years before. My father, who started life in a tenement on the Lower East Side of New York, did not emphasize scholarship in quite the same way he might have in a later generation. He was one of those young people, a son of an immigrant from a large struggling family, whose through brilliance and drive, hard work, luck, and a keen eye for opportunity, went from being an apprentice lawyer to a successful publisher of newspapers, from Staten Island to Long Island, Newark, to Syracuse, he began buying newspapers in a pre-digital era when newspapers were the core of a community. . Both my brother and I were eager to go to work in his fascinating newspaper world. . When I arrived at Syracuse, it was the post war years. Like so many University, Syracuse expanded to accommodate thousands of returning veterans. The campus was filled with Quonset huts acting as dormitories and classrooms. In my freshman year I was assigned a bunk in the hay lost in a barn on the grounds of the State Fair, 5 miles from campus. . I was a shy teenager and I wasn't exactly proving myself a great scholar. . I was also inpatient to begin work in my father's world. Too impatient to make my way to commencement. I left Syracuse after my sophomore year. . And so I went to work for a paper on Long Island called the Press. I learned the business side of newspapering, a world that is now as dated as Gutenburg himself, the art of typesetting, the mechanics of the presses, lead plates, acid-edged photos, barrels of black ink, tons of news print, every day the production cycle began at 4 AM and that's when I began work. . And I loved it! . To this day I still can't help but get to the office by 5, just about when you all will be getting home after tonight's celebration, I would guess. . My uncle Teddy was my coach, mentor. He taught me the business. He was rock hard and fierce and decisive. Not long after I started working for him, he went on a brief vacation. When he came back he said to me these never to be forgotten words: Donald, I have met this girl and you are going to marry her. . [Laughter] . I said, yes, Teddy. With that my life changed. . Susan Marley was her name, and our first date lasted as long as I could stretch it. From a dinner at a New York restaurant to two nightclubs, I was absolutely taken with her instantly. Susie had a dazzling smile and was charming and alive, intellectual, and boundlessly kind. And she was a Syracuse girl. . At evening's end I asked her for another date the next night, but I was broke, and so on a beautiful starry moon bright summer night we rode the Staten Island ferry, which was free. [Laughter] . And with my uncle's instructions in mind, and my desires, I asked my Susie to marry me. Susie said, you must be crazy! . And she added, I'm 18 and not going to marry until I graduate Wellesley. . Not so crazy me, five days after she graduated we were married. . [Applause] . Which brings me back to Syracuse University. After my premature exit in 1950. My Susie's parents, Lillian and Harry Marley, were Syracusans who graduated Syracuse University in the 1920s. Harry was president of Syracuse's Board of Education and had close ties with the University. Lillian and Harry's blood ran orange. They turned my dad's and my blood orange. . And in Harry's and my dad's spirit, let me here offer my hardy congratulations to the Orange's women's and men's basketball teams and to coaches Q and Jim Boeheim for making it to the final four this year. [Applause] . Syracuse University, as you know, has many great schools, all represented here by you. But you will forgive me if I speak of one that has a special place in my heart. It started with a 20-minute post breakfast meeting at The Hotel Syracuse if many the late 1950s with then Chancellor William Tolley and my dad and me at which an agreement was reached to establish the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. . [Applause] . And it runs through the dedication of Newhouse 1 by Lyndon Johnson at which the President made the historic gulf of Tonken speech, the dedication of Newhouse 2 by CBS William Paley, Newhouse 3 by chief justice John Roberts and the rededication of Newhouse 2 by Oprah, and continues today with my friendship with the school's two great Deans, David Rubin and Lorraine Branham, who deserve full credit for Newhouse being the great school it is today. . [Applause] . My marriage so Susie -- with my marriage to Susie I began a half century that was cloudless and happy in more ways than I can recount. . But because life is never cloudless, even for the very lucky, this happy story takes a turn. In 2003 my beautiful Susie was diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia, a dementia, that gradually robbed her of speech and eventually the ability to understand speech. . From 2003 to 2010 the downhill slope was gradual but unmistakable. . And then in 2010, she became incapable of taking care of herself. When you are fortunate enough to be in love for so long, to enjoy your family and work for so long, there is a feeling of power, of control, I confess to having that feeling, and I lost it. Before her dementia, my Susie and I were as one. As the disease progressed, Susie would change and plateau, change and plateau, and with each change our worlds diverged a little more. I found myself running to catch up with her and this was not a race I could possibly win. . My life's focus changed. It had to. . I could hardly spend the time I once did on work. What was now required of me was something intensely personal but absolutely essential. I had to make a single-minded effort to learn what I needed to know to make my wife's life bearable. . That required my immersing myself in the literature about the disease and extensive work with caregivers and professionals. . Like so many who face the loss of a loved one to a physical or mental condition, I had so much to learn in order to do right by my Sue at the very moment when she needed me the most. . When Sue's disease reached its ultimate stage, when she was no longer able to care for herself or to communicate with the outside world, I came to the conclusion that what she would want me to do was to play some role in finding a treatment for this horrendous dementia. . And so with the same determination I once reserved for my life's in the publishing business, I began an illuminating education in what was possible. . I did so with the help of a profoundly effective organization, the association for frontal temporal degeneration. They have helped me learn a great deal about Sue's dementia and they have pointed me to a road that hopefully might lead to a treatment for it. . From the vantage point of 86 years, I can say with some degree of confidence that many of you sooner or later will face the seemingly unexpected, the mysterious, serious events and moments in time that you hadn't figured into your plans. . And when that -- the time comes, you will have had one advantage that I did not. By finishing your education here, you have a -- you've had a prolonged experience that exposed you to complex philosophical ideas, to scientific methods, to a sense of history, to views of the human experience that only great writers and artists can provide. . That education, of course, is only a start. Your education here and the education that I hope will be a continuing process in your lives is an essential part of the equipment you will need both to contribute as professionals to the greater community and also to help you live your lives, your personal lives, in a thoughtful, productive, and decent way. . And finally, I would add a personal wish. I would hope some of you who studied in the fields of humanities and in the sciences, young as you are, will think of careers that touch on the aged, the demented and will work to find treatments for these disease or to find ways of supporting the millions upon millions of families in the United States that have been financially and psychologically devastated by the burdens placed on them by the need to care for their loved ones. . Class of 2016, I salute you, I am proud to have received my Syracuse University degree alongside of you, and I wish you great success in your pursuit of happiness. Thank you. [Applause] . >> Chancellor Syverud will now award honorary degrees for Syracuse University. Will Dean Karin Ruhlandt please present your candidate. >> Kevin Bell. Scientist, scholar, wildlife conservationist. You have dedicated your life to the better care and greater understanding and protection of all creatures great and small. Growing up with your family in the magical environment of the Bronx Zoo, where your father was bird curator, you started early on a path toward zoology. Your fieldwork has taken you to places around the globe. You have conducted research in such places as Panama, India, Africa and Iceland, with a passionate curiosity and an appreciation for the precious nature of the earth's animal beings. As CEO of Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo, you promote learning among visitors young and old, building efforts to help save species and securing support for the zoo's future. Your leadership has been sought nationally and internationally to help the advancement of zoos and conservation and guide standards for animal welfare. We are pleased to honor you for your outstanding contributions to zoology and your boundless energy and joy in the care of the world's animals. Chancellor, I have the honor to present for the degree of doctor of science, honoris causa, Kevin J. Bell. . [Applause] . >> Will Dean Diane Lyden Murphy please present your candidate. >> Floyd Little. . [Applause] . Football icon, businessman, role model and mentor. Your passion to excel defined you as a gridiron great and continues to inspire student-athletes seeking to make their own mark in sports and in life. Immortalized at Syracuse as one of the great running backs who launched the number "44" to legendary status, you carried that same drive for excellence into every endeavor. Your multifaceted career reveals a record of success built on hard work, determination, and a buoyant spirit that touches all who interact with you. A hall-of-famer in football and in life, you returned to Syracuse after a successful business career to become a key member of the athletics leadership team. As a mentor and role model to current student-athletes, you teach them to compete always with dignity and honor and to give their best in all they do. We are pleased to honor you for your extraordinary achievements and your selfless dedication to Syracuse University and to our student-athletes. and others. . Chancellor, I have the honor to present for the degree of doctor of humane letters, honoris causa, Floyd D. Little. . [Applause] . >> Will Dean Lorraine Branham please present your candidate. >> Donald Newhouse. Businessman, industry leader, philanthropist. . You have forged a remarkable legacy built on hard work, quiet leadership, and a commitment to seeding opportunity and excellence in the next generation of communicators. As president of Advance Publications, you have developed a distinct reputation for your rigorous work ethic and commitment to giving local newspapers autonomy to be responsive to community needs. Under your leadership, Newhouse-owned newspapers have won some of the most prestigious awards in the industry, including the Pulitzer Prize. A past chair of the Newspaper Association of America, you earned its highest honor, the Katharine Graham Lifetime Achievement Award. Your philanthropy has touched countless lives as well. Along with your beloved wife, Susan, and family, you have provided generous support for the arts, medical institutions, schools, and charitable groups. At Syracuse, your support for the school that bears your father's name is legendary and its impact incalculable. We are pleased to honor you for your outstanding professional achievements, your generous spirit, and your steadfast dedication to Syracuse University. Chancellor, I have the honor to present for the degree of doctor of letters, honoris causa, Donald E. Newhouse. . [Applause] . >> Will Dean Karin Ruhlandt please present your candidate. >> Tobias Wolff. Writer, teacher, mentor. Your poignant works of prose have distinguished you as one of the great truth-tellers of our time. As a short-story craftsman and memoirist, you stand among the most influential writers of the day, with a distinctive voice that is spare yet graceful, and always deeply authentic. From your unflinching recounting of your childhood in the best-selling This Boy's Life, to your most recent collections, you have earned numerous awards for your work. In 2015, President Barack Obama presented you with the National Medal of Arts. You also were instrumental in building the success of Syracuse University's creative writing program. Many of your protégés from the program would go on to become acclaimed writers and mentors themselves. Your capacity to discover top talent and your continued support for former colleagues and students advanced a legacy of excellence that endures today. We are pleased to honor you for your superb body of work and lasting impact on your field and on those who have the good fortune to learn from you. Chancellor, I have the honor to present for the degree of doctor of humane letters, honoris causa, Tobias Wolff. . [Applause] . >> Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome chairman of the Syracuse University Board of Trustees, Steven W. Barnes. . [Applause] . >> What a wonderful and proud day. . It is now time to conferee merry Tuesday status to our distinguished faculty members. . Please rise as your name is read. Bruce James Abbey. Professor, Architecture. School of Architecture. Kristi Andersen. Professor, Political Science. Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Karen M. Bakke. Associate Professor, School of Design. College of Visual and Performing Arts. Ann C. Clarke. Dean and Associate Professor. College of Visual and Performing Arts. Edward Lipson. Professor, Physics. College of Arts and Sciences. Arthur W. McDonald. Professor, Architecture. School of Architecture. Upon recommendation of the University Senate and on behalf of the Board of Trustees, I confer upon each of you the status of emeritus faculty. Ladies and gentlemen, please join me again in thanking these dedicated individuals. . [Applause] . Thank you. . >> Now we will begin to confer doctoral degrees. All doctoral candidates will remain standing facing the platform after their degrees are conferred so that they may come to the platform to be greeted personally by Chancellor Syverud. Interim Dean Peter Vanable will present candidates for the doctoral degree in the Graduate School of Syracuse University. >> Candidates for the doctoral degrees at Syracuse University, please rise and come forward. >> Chancellor Syverud, I have the honor to present these candidates as qualified to receive their degrees. >> Following action by the University Senate and authorization by the Board of Trustees of Syracuse University, I now confer upon each of you the degree appropriate to your course of study. The diploma you have earned gives you all the rights, responsibilities, and honors. pertaining to that degree. Congratulations! . [Applause] . >> Will the doctoral degree recipients please come forward to be greeted by Chancellor Syverud. [Graduate Names] . [Applause] . >> Ladies and Gentlemen, the College of Law graduates, including Juris Doctor and Master of Laws in American Law candidates, received their degrees on Friday. We recognize and congratulate those graduates and the College of Law Interim Dean, William Banks. [Applause] >> Candidates for Master's degrees and Certificates of Advanced Studies at Syracuse University will be presented by Interim Dean Peter Vanable. >> Candidates for Master's degrees and Certificates of Advanced Studies at Syracuse University, please rise. . [Applause] . Chancellor Syverud, I have the honor to present these candidates as qualified to receive their degrees. >> Following action by the University Senate and authorization by the Board of Trustees of Syracuse University, I now confer upon each of you the degree appropriate to your course of study. The diploma you have earned gives you all the rights, responsibilities, and honors pertaining to that degree. Congratulations! . [Applause] . >> Thank you, you can now be seated. . >> The Environmental Science and Forestry college scholars, the Syracuse University. scholars, and the two class marshals will please rise and come up to the platform. to be greeted by Chancellor Syverud and President Wheeler. Chancellor Syverud and President Wheeler, I have the great honor to present these candidates who were selected from a field of outstanding representatives of the Class of 2016. . [Applause] . Fiction we have our SUNY ESF scholars. . John Swartzfager Denali Trimble We now have our Syracuse University scholars. . Alice Blank Lis Chan Cora Cool-Mihalyi Adrian Hatch Kaitlyn Hobson Terry Jones Eun-Jin Keish Kim Mailyn Nishiguchi Verónica Ortiz-Calderón Robert Swanda Samantha Usman Joshua Woods . >> Now our class marshals. . Alexis Peña Tatiana Williams >> I would like everyone to know that candidates in the Army and Air Force ROTC programs were commissioned as Second Lieutenants at a service in Hendricks Chapel Friday evening. Will they please stand and be recognized? [Applause] We wish you well as you go to serve and protect our country. >> Will the academic deans of the schools and colleges of Syracuse University presenting candidates for the associate and baccalaureate degrees please Come forward after I announce the name of each dean, will their degree candidates rise and remain standing. . Dean Karin Ruhlandt and Dean James Steinberg. Will the degree candidates from the College of Arts and Sciences and Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs please rise? . [Applause] . Dean Ann Clarke. Will the degree candidates from the College of Visual and Performing Arts please rise? Dean Teresa Dahlberg. Will the degree candidates from the College of Engineering and Computer Science please rise? Interim Dean Jeffrey Stanton. Will the degree candidates from the School of Information Studies please rise? Dean Kenneth Kavajecz. Will the degree candidates from the Martin J. Whitman School of Management please rise? Dean Lorraine Branham. Will the degree candidates from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications please rise? Dean Michael Speaks. Will the degree candidates from the School of Architecture please rise? Dean Diane Lyden Murphy. Will the degree candidates from the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics please rise? Dean Joanna Masingila. Will the degree candidates from the School of Education please rise? Dean Bea Gonzalez. Will the degree candidates receiving a professional studies degree from University College please rise? Representing the academic deans, Associate Provost Andria Costello Staniec will present the candidates for associate and baccalaureate degrees from all the schools and colleges. >> Chancellor Syverud, I have the honor to present these candidates as most worthy to receive their degrees. >> Associate Provost Costello Staniec. Following action by the University Senate and authorization by the Board of Trustees of Syracuse University, I now confer upon each of you the degree appropriate to your course of study. The diploma you have earned gives you all the rights, responsibilities, and honors pertaining to that degree. You may now move the tassels on your mortarboards to the left. [Applause] . >> Immediately following today's ceremony, the Chancellor will proceed to Hendricks Chapel to be available to take photos with degree recipients and family members. And now we ask all of our graduates and their guests to remain standing or rise for the Alma Mater and continue to remain standing for the recessional. The Alma Mater will be led by Maria Whitcomb, who is receiving a bachelor's degree in vocal performance from the College of Visual and Performing Arts. [Music] Where the vale of Onondaga Meets the eastern sky Proudly stands our Alma mater On her hilltop high. Flag we love! Orange! Float for aye - Old Syracuse, o'er thee Loyal be thy sons and daughters To thy memory. [Cheering] Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to the 162nd Commencement of Syracuse University. >> This morning degrees will be conferred on candidates who have qualified for associate's, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees, and those qualified to receive certificates of advanced studies. More than 5,000 students will participate in today's Commencement ceremony. >> The degree candidates procession, entering at the left front, is led by two class marshals of the Syracuse University Class of 2016, Alexis Pena and Tatiana Williams. They have been chosen by an all-University committee sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs to have the distinct honor of leading their classmates on this significant and memorable day. Walking just behind them are the Syracuse University Scholars. These undergraduate students of the Class of 2016 have been named University Scholars because of their academic excellence and scholarly achievements. They received the nomination of their respective schools and colleges and were selected by a committee of the University Senate. Their names are in your program. You will note that this year Syracuse University celebrates its 162nd Commencement, despite the fact that the University is 145 years old. Founded in 1870, the first commencement was held in 1872. However, during and just after World War II, Syracuse University opened its doors to the returning veterans, who attended in great numbers. Multiple commencements were held during those years until 1952, when the University returned to the tradition of holding one commencement in the spring. The candidates for advanced degrees are next in the procession. The first group consists of those who will receive doctoral degrees this morning. The banners, which you will see carried by the student marshals of each school, symbolize the schools and colleges that make up Syracuse University. The banner preceding the doctoral candidates is that of the Graduate School. The Graduate School offers over 200 degree programs among its 10 schools and colleges and awards approximately 1,600 Master's degrees each year. Since its founding, the Graduate School has been a leader in quality graduate education among its peers in higher education. Now, ladies and gentlemen, entering at the right is the marshal and recent graduate representing the Syracuse University College of Law. The law students' degrees were conferred this past Friday. Vice President Joseph Biden gave the keynote address to the candidates and their families. The College of Law was founded in 1895 and is home to interdisciplinary programs, experiential learning opportunities, and innovative centers and institutes. The college remains focused on student success and preparing the next generation of great legal practitioners. Entering at the right are candidates for the Certificate of Advanced Studies, the Master of Arts, the Master of Fine Arts, the Master of Science, and Master's degrees in professional fields from the Graduate School. Within this group are candidates from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Maxwell is recognized as one of the world's best graduate schools of public affairs and offers undergraduate programs in the social sciences. You will note the variety of colors on the hoods of the advanced degree candidates and, of course, each has a meaning. For example, those candidates wearing hoods of white did their graduate work in the Arts and Letters; those wearing golden yellow studied in the Sciences. The institution of learning, in this instance, Syracuse University, is signified by the color of the lining of the hood. Orange is the official Syracuse University color. You will find a summary of the meaning of the caps, gowns, and hoods worn today under the heading Academic Heraldry in the back of your program. Undergraduate degrees will be presented to students who have qualified in the University's several schools and colleges. Because the groups appear in the procession according to the age of their respective colleges, those from the College of Arts and Sciences are first, now entering at your left. As the liberal arts college at the center of a major research institution, the College of Arts and Sciences stands as the intellectual heart and soul of Syracuse University, providing a highly-personalized academic experience. With more than 50 majors in mathematics, the sciences, the social sciences via the Maxwell School, and the humanities, the College prepares each student for success as a citizen of the world through disciplinary and interdisciplinary teaching and learning, research, scholarship, and service on campus and around the world. When Syracuse University was founded in 1870, the focus of the new institution of higher learning was local and regional. Today the focus is both national and international with a diverse student body coming from each of the 50 states and more than 100 countries. The flags you see on the floor of the Dome represent the homes of all our students. In particular is the flag of the Great State of New York. This year marks the 30th anniversary of former New York Governor Mario M. Cuomo's inspiring and memorable commencement address to the Class of 1986. Today we remember Governor Cuomo, who passed away on New Years Day 2015. Finally, included is the flag of Haudenosaunee Confederacy. We acknowledge with respect to the Onondaga Nation, the indigenous people whose ancestral lands we now stand on. The next group to enter the arena at your right is comprised of the candidates from the College of Visual and Performing Arts. The College of Visual and Performing Arts traces its history back to 1873 and is proudly the first college of fine arts in the country to award a four-year degree. After rigorous study and practice in art, design, drama, music, transmedia, or communication and rhetorical studies, SU VPA students graduate to become cultural leaders who innovate, inspire, and push boundaries. Degree candidates from the College of Engineering and Computer Science are now entering at your left. Students and faculty in Syracuse University's College of Engineering and Computer Science apply critical thinking skills to design and develop the computational and engineering solutions to achieve a higher quality of life for all. Collaborating across disciplines, they lead efforts in building a safer, healthier, and more sustainable world. On your right, baccalaureate degree candidates from the School of Education begin their march. The School of Education, a national leader in inclusive urban education, prepares leaders to transform education. The School is committed to improving and informing educational practice for diverse communities. The School of Education pioneered the inclusion movement in the United States, making way for all learners to participate fully in mainstream classrooms and other inclusive learning environments. Entering at your left are the candidates to receive bachelor's degrees from the School of Information Studies. The School of Information Studies is the original information school, with a vision to expand human capabilities through information, and transform the information field through leadership in research, development, and education. Now entering on your right are the candidates from the Martin J. Whitman School of Management. The School's entrepreneurship and supply chain management programs are consistently ranked among the top in the country, and Whitman's emphasis on experiential learning distinguishes its graduates in the marketplace. Whitman is also renowned for its globally diverse MBA programs, both traditional and online. And now, ladies and gentlemen, to your left the procession continues with the degree candidates from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. The Newhouse School is the country's leading school of communications, with majors spanning virtually every known form of information dissemination. Newhouse students graduating today become part of the school's strong and loyal alumni network, which includes some of the most powerful and successful communications professionals in the world. Now beginning their procession at your right are the candidates for the baccalaureate degree from the School of Architecture. The Syracuse University School of Architecture was founded in 1873 and is consistently ranked among the best schools of architecture in the nation. The School provides a highly innovative learning environment, leading the effort to make a better world through the design of better buildings and cities. Entering on your right to take their seats are the degree candidates from the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. The programs within this college are the School of Social Work, the Department of Child & Family Studies, the Department of Marriage and Family Therapy, the Department of Public Health, Food Studies and Nutrition and the Department of Sport Management. Next on your left is the University College banner, carried by a marshal who Represents a wide-ranging contingency of graduates. University College was established in 1918 to provide support and services to a diverse population of students studying part time. UC is the home of the Bachelor of Profession Studies degree and partners with the schools and colleges across campus to provide access to all those seeking a Syracuse University degree. Completing the procession on your left, the degree candidates from the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry are now entering the arena. Leading their procession are the college marshals. Three scholars of the graduating class follow the marshals. The scholars were chosen on the basis of their exceptional academic achievement. You will find the names of these marshals and scholars in your program. ESF is one of the nation's top-ranked environmental colleges. It is the oldest and largest college in the country devoted exclusively to the study of the environment. Now, ladies and gentlemen, with the candidates assembled, the academic procession is about to begin. Ladies and gentlemen, the academic procession will continue from your left front. The mace bearer will lead the groups of newly retired emeriti faculty, the faculty from the schools and colleges, the University's administrative staff, the Chancellor's executive team, the academic deans, and the members of the Syracuse University and State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry Board of Trustees. The charter mace is carried by Nancy Weatherly Sharp, Professor Emerita of Newspaper Journalism in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. First to follow are the newly appointed emeriti faculty, those who begin their retirement from active teaching and will be recognized later in today's ceremony. Walking immediately behind these honored teachers are fellow emeriti faculty, current faculty members, and members of the University's administrative staff. Following the faculty procession are the members of the Chancellor's Executive Team, which is composed of senior-level advisors and administrators. In the next group are the deans of the University's schools and colleges, and the deans from other divisions within the University. Maurice Harris, Dean of Undergraduate Admissions David Seaman, Dean of Libraries Rebecca Reed Kantrowitz, Senior Vice President and Dean of the Division of Student Affairs William Banks, Interim Dean of the College of Law Joanna Masingila, Dean of the School of Education Jeffrey Stanton, Interim Dean of the School of Information Studies Theresa Dahlberg, Dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Science Kenneth Kavajecz, Dean of the Martin J. Whitman School of Management Ann Clarke, Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts Michael Speaks, Dean of the School of Architecture James Steinberg, Dean of the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs Bea Gonzalez, Dean of University College And Peter Vanable, Interim Dean of the Graduate School And now entering the arena are the Trustees of Syracuse University. The Board of Trustees is the governing body of the University, responsible for the educational mission and fiscal policies of the University. Members of the Board guide the University toward its goals and vision and serve the public trust. Concluding the academic procession is the Chancellor's party entering on your left. Leading this group are: Shiu-Kai Chin, University Marshal, Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor for Teaching Excellence and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Computer Science. Kelly Chandler-Olcott, Associate University Marshal, Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor for Teaching Excellence and Professor and Chair of Reading and Language Arts in the School of Education. Andria Costello Staniec, Associate Professor, Associate Provost of Academic Affairs. The University marshals are followed by: Samuel Clemence, Interim Dean of Hendricks Chapel. Mark Verone, Class of '95, President of the Syracuse University Alumni Association. Next are the deans who are presenting their Honorary Degree Recipients. Lorraine Branham, Dean of the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. Diane Lyden Murphy, Dean of the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. Karin Ruhlandt, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Those deans are followed by the honorary degree recipients. They are: Kevin J. Bell, receiving an honorary Doctor of Science. Floyd D. Little, being awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Tobias Wolff, receiving an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Following the honorary degree recipients are the final members of the Chancellor's group. Quentin Wheeler, President of the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Vita Demarchi, Chair of the Board of Trustees of the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Steven Barnes, Chairman of the Syracuse University Board of Trustees. Donald E. Newhouse, an honorary degree recipient being presented a Doctor of Letters, Honoris Causa, and our 2016 Commencement speaker. Elizabeth Liddy, Interim Vice Chancellor and Provost of Syracuse University. And Kent Syverud, Chancellor and President of Syracuse University. Appointed by the University's Board of Trustees in January 2014, Chancellor Syverud is the 12th leader of the University since its founding in 1870. Will members of the audience who can, please rise for the presentation of the colors. The Color Guard now moving into place is composed of members of the Army and Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps at Syracuse University. Ladies and gentlemen, the academic procession is complete. The 162nd Commencement of Syracuse University is about to begin. >> Chancellor Syverud, by authorization of the Board of Trustees and the University faculty, I declare the 162nd Commencement of Syracuse University. to be in session. . [Applause] . Good morning, everyone. . I am Liz Liddy, Interim Vice Chancellor and Provost of Syracuse University. It is my privilege to welcome you here today. We ask that you remain standing for the invocation and the National Anthem. The invocation will be given by Samuel Clemence, Interim Dean of Hendricks Chapel. . >> Let us pray. We gather this day to celebrate and honor the collective achievements of our students and scholars, family and friends. As we celebrate, may we be ever mindful of those who supported us. for loyal friends and loving families, we give thanks. For patient teachers and demanding challenges, we give thanks. Poised between the past and the future, we come with gratitude for all that has led us here. For friendships made and laughter shared, for challenges faced, failures survived and hope renewed, we give thanks. In this moment renew in us the deeply-held values we nurtured here as we prepare ourselves to be engaged, global citizens united in our goal of creating a better, more just world. Amen. >> The National Anthem will be led by Kirsten Ariel Marsh, who is receiving a master of music, vocal performance from the College of Visual and Performing Arts. Oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming and the rockets' red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there oh, say does that star-spangled banner yet wave o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave. . [Applause] . >> Please be seated. Ladies and gentlemen, I have the great pleasure of introducing the 12th Chancellor and President of Syracuse University, Kent Syverud. . [Applause] . >> Welcome, everyone. Graduates, faculty, staff, alumni, trustees, family, friends, welcome to the Class of 2016 Syracuse University Commencement. . I will be followed in this welcome and fair well by the outstanding president of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry my friend Quentin Wheeler. This is a happy day. Each of you who are graduating today got here because of your own hard work, each of you who are graduating today also got here because of so many people who have faith in you. Some of those people, faculty and staff are sitting in front of you and working all around this Dome and outside of it. Some of the people who the support you and have faith in you, friends, family, classmates, are right behind you, are seated next to you, where once again as always, they have your back. Some of the people who have supported you and are watching this ceremony through the webcast are all around the world. I thank every single person here in the Dome or around the world who helped each of you arrive at this glorious day. Syracuse University is full of dedicated faculty and staff and alumni and trustees who give their hearts and their souls for this place and especially for the students in it. These are people who are there when you need them. There are many such people here today, some of whom are retiring from positions as you graduate. They include interim Provost Liz Liddy, Dean Ann Clarke of the College of Visual and Performing Arts, Dean James Steinberg of the Maxwell School, Interim Dean Stanton of the iSchool, and the incomparable Floyd Little. Please join me in thanking all of them. . [Applause] . Class of 2016, as you graduate from Syracuse today in front of all these luminaries, I would ask you to reflect on one person. Otto. . Otto is our mascot. . Otto is an Orange. . Otto has three important thing to say to you. First, Otto is unique and that is just fine. . Some about people would say Otto is fat. Some people would say Otto is is a fruit. Some people would say Otto has no clear gender. . Does that mean Otto is not part of us and Otto does not help define us? No. If I have learned one thing about you, the graduates of the Class of 2016, is that the only thing that is truly normal about a Syracuse student is that every single one of you is unique. That is what is so wonderful about this sprawling idiosyncratic and inspiring place, there is no one normal, other than that at our best each of us can be unique. So now you go out into that cold world, some days you will look at yourself in the mirror or you will look at a new co-worker or someone you meet and you will find yourself seeing someone who is fat or strange or different. At that moment I want you to stop and think of Otto, I want you to say that's Otto, Otto is just a part of who we are at our best. . Second -- [Applause] . Second, Otto has a disability and that is just fine. As all of you know, Otto cannot talk. Otto never talks. Even when someone drops a keg of beer on Otto's foot, which I have seen -- No words come out. . Just because Otto cannot talk doesn't mean that Otto cannot do things. Of course not. Otto is the everywhere, an integral part of this place, not really a mascot at all, but part of our spirit. Otto can't talk, but Otto somehow speaks for us all in victory and in defeat. So now you go out into that cold world, please remember that a warm Syracuse at its best didn't just include someone with disabilities, Syracuse embraced someone with a disability and empowered that person with a disability to make us better. . [Applause] . We all have our secret and not so secret challenges, some of them do not show on the outside. They may not rise to the level of disability, but we can let them hold us back just the same. . I have several. I have a deep irrational anxiety about speaking in public. . This is really true. But at Syracuse I just look to Otto. Otto can't speak and yet Otto runs out in front of 30,000 people in the Dome and ten people at a local pancake breakfast every day, Otto just does the job which is usually to make people better. Whatever your challenge, whatever your disability, please remember Otto. . Third, and finally, underneath Otto's skin, Otto's peel, there is a decent human being. One of the joy of my job is that once in a very long while I get to do something that nobody else at the University gets to do. This year I asked to meet Otto. Not the mascot, but the human being underneath. . And when I did, I discovered that Otto is really a group of selfless students just like you. They have majors and jobs and dreams and challenges and disabilities. They are members of teams and churches and clubs and societies. And on top of everything else they do, they go out there every day and smile as Otto. They hug a kid, they lead a cheer, they help out. Otto it turns out is like each of you, so much of this place was driven by similar groups of selfless students, from SU ambulance to zanbonie revolution, from student association to University union. So now you go out into the cold world, remember that this place was made so much better when you did something extra beyond your regular job with a group of selfless colleagues. You can do that in the world too and make it more like Syracuse. Class of 2016, Otto is graduating today. I mean that literally, sitting among you looking just like you in cap and gown are selfless students who were Otto. But I also mean that everybody who is graduating today is Otto to me. Even though you look the same right now in cap and gown, I know that underneath that skin is a wonderful unique person who can, like Otto, show kindness to strangers and sometimes thereby entertain Angels without knowing it. Class of 2016, whatever you look like on the outside, we at Syracuse will always remember one thing: Including when you are in need or when you have a triumph or a tragedy, every single one of you, whatever you look like on the outside, whatever you were born with, whatever you have become, as far as we all are are concerned, your peel will forever be Orange. Thank you and farewell! . [Applause] . >> Good morning. From ESF, the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and its faculty, staff, students, and trustees,. I bring congratulations to the Syracuse University Class of 2016. You are receiving degrees today from one of the world's great universities. And whether you are headed next to further studies or to make your mark in the "real world," your Syracuse education has prepared you for success. Robert Orben described a graduation ceremony as an event where the Commencement speaker tells thousands of students dressed in identical caps and gowns that individuality is the key to success. Well, there you are, and here I am. Always trust yourself. Your instincts. Your Syracuse education. It is your unique combination of passions, dreams, experiences, knowledge and skills that will lead you to define success on your own terms. That, and a few good recommendation letters. So tell the faculty how great they were at the reception. I conferred degrees upon ESF graduates yesterday at our College's Commencement exercises. I want to take a moment to ask the ESF graduates to rise so we can congratulate them too. . [Applause] . Thank you. Please be seated. . We join you today to celebrate also the many wonderful connections between our Two great institutions. . From shared instruction to collaborative research, community impact, and student activities, the synergies between SU and ESF have fantastic results. The best of which sit before us today. It has been said that the optimist is the person who believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds and that the pessimist is the person who is afraid That they're right. . Be optimistic because the world is filled with beauty and possibilities. But be a little pessimistic, too. You can always make the world better, and we are counting on you to do it. Congratulations, Class of 2016! . [Applause] . >> I am pleased to introduce Mark Verone, Class of 1994, President of the Syracuse University Alumni Association. . [Applause] . >> Thank you. It is my honor on behalf of more than 250,000 Syracuse University alumni around the world to welcome you as the newest members of the Syracuse University Alumni Association. You are now part of Generation Orange, Syracuse University's graduates of the last ten years. Welcome to our alumni family. [Applause] My name is Mark Verone, and I'm a 1995 graduate of the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. As I was reflecting on what to say today, it occurred to me that 21 years ago I was sitting right, probably over there, and I was listening to a lot of older, wiser folks spreading their wisdom to yet another graduating class. . When you're over 40 you get labeled old. At least that is what my 4-year-old tells me. there have been 161 of these ceremonies prior to today. Think about that. Think about what this day means. I admit it never crossed my mind as a 21-year-old graduate that I would be one of those "older people" standing on this stage speaking at Commencement. At the time I was panicking about getting a job and starting my own life after college. I was not thinking about the value of our Orange family and all of my Orange connections. It wasn't until I started making those Orange connections that I realized how special and important this Orange bond is between all alumni and what it means to be a graduate of Syracuse University. We all share this common Orange bond. It's a safety blanket and it is always your home. We all shared the SU student experience, and this alumni bond is incredibly powerful. No matter where I go in this world, there is so much joy when I meet a fellow alum. No matter the age difference, we relate because of the Orange bond. For the past two decades, I've seen the magic of alumni interacting with each other and with our Alma Mater. In fact, many of the people sitting on this stage have their names attached to scholarships, classrooms, and buildings across our campus. Their generosity to Syracuse comes from a desire to maintain this Orange bond. They've chosen to stay connected, to stay engaged, and to give back to this institution. I hope that all of you will do the same so that the next generation will have the same opportunities for success as you've had. So I ask: How will you leave your mark? How will you stay connected to Syracuse? Perhaps you'll join one of our 70-plus alumni clubs and groups around the world. Maybe you'll tune in to the new alumni webinar series we just launched with Career Services. Or you'll consider helping the office of admissions to identify the next generation of students. Wherever you go, we hope you continue to bleed Orange, and please show your Orange pride, especially on social media. . Again, on behalf of the Syracuse University Alumni Association, congratulations and welcome to the Syracuse University alumni family. I hope to see all of you back on campus in September for Orange Central. . [Applause] . >> Thank you, President Verone. According to a tradition at Syracuse University, 12 remarkable young men and women of the Class of 2016 have been selected by a committee of the University Senate and named University Scholars. Their academic excellence and scholarly achievements are an inspiration to all of Us and bring distinction to this University. . Kaitlyn Hobson, from S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications/ College of Arts and Sciences will deliver remarks on behalf of the Class of 2016. >> Distinguished guests, emotional parents, aunts and uncles who cannot believe Syracuse is still this cold, and people who accidentally wandered in here thinking there was a basketball game - Welcome. Class of 2016, you've navigated many different obstacles to get here. But since we got here, I would like to point out one obstacle we all navigated together. During our time at Syracuse University, we have trekked through 485-inches of snow. . [Applause] . That's nearly 40 feet of snow in four years. 40 feet of snow in four years means the one thing we all have in common is that we have fallen down and gotten back up a lot. . Freshmen year I lived in BBB. , it was the first day of spring semester classes and I took the law building stairs home. . I landed on an icy step and became a human super-ball, bouncing down the stairs. A nice guy at the bottom looked over me, helping me up as I simultaneously laughed and cried. He asked if I was okay and said quite seriously, pay attention to where you step. . So, Class of 2016, where were you the first time the Syracuse weather took you down? And do you remember who helped you back up? . I've seen many of you fall. On the slushy floor in Bird Library. Down East Adams hill during sorority recruitment, outside Chucks and for some strange reason inside Chucks, I have seen some graceful falls where people do a half split and then from the window at the daily Orange I would watch as some of you plummeted down the brick hill on Clarendon street, the falls are are all different, but the scene afterward is almost always same. Someone helps you up. Maybe it's your friend or a complete stranger or yourself. You laugh, then you pay attention to where you step. You move a bit lighter. . I have to thank physical plant for working so hard to ensure our safety. They're the incredibly dedicated staff in charge of snow removal and salting. You do an outstanding job. But I also have to thank you for bolstering my metaphor, because no matter how fancy your snowplow, no matter how much salt you throw on our path, we're still going to fall. . Over the last four years I've come to understand a few things about life from watching all of us fall down and get back up. I have come to understand that we learn to appreciate the people who are most valuable to us when we fall. The people who help us back up and those who will do almost anything to keep us from falling again. . I've also come to understand that how you get back up is important. It's all about the recovery. As we've seen watching our men's and women's basketball teams. When you fall, you become a bit less afraid of it happening again because you know you will get back up. Over the last four years after my freshman year wipe out a few more times, I fell in love with a dust sweet smell of old newspapers in the daily orange house, I fell in love with this campus while looking up at the tolling Setnor School of Music in a snowstorm, I fell in love with my majors, mostly though I fell in love with all of you. All of the people here who kept helping me back up. . Most of us will now begin to move away from Syracuse. Our days of trudging through 40 feet of snow may be over. But we will continue to fall. Sometimes it will be quick, sometimes embarrassing, and sometimes even dangerous. But we have to get back up. We get back up because we have gotten up before. We keep going because our family, our friends, and Syracuse University have given us the emotional, intellectual, and spiritual resources to get back up. Class of 2016, congratulations, and pay attention to where you step. . [Applause] . >> I am deeply honored to introduce Donald Newhouse as our Commencement speaker. He is a giant in print and digital communications. He has established an international reputation as a leader of America's largest privately held chain of newspapers. After attending Syracuse 65 years ago, Donald maintained a strong and passionate relationship with his Alma Mater. His father had the vision and selflessness to help create our S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. The original building designed by Pei, one of the great architects of the world, dedicated in 1964 by president Johnson. To this day, Donald and his family are deeply involved as this school stays true to its mission, their generosity and bold vision allow the Newhouse School to build Newhouse 3. Communication students from around the world aspire to study at Newhouse and to carry the Newhouse name. The Newhouse mission retains a clear and singular beauty, to seek and to share the truth. Beyond our campus Donald Newhouse has deep and lasting ties to the greater Syracuse community. We share in his grief over the passing last year of his wife Susan, she was a native of Syracuse and an unforgettable humanitarian, the opportunity it know Donald, fully appreciate his perspective and humility has been one of the joy of my time as Chancellor. Syracuse University was not just a stop in Donald's life, it represents and helped form an ethic that brought him to this day. Our great hope is that each of today's graduates will carry a similar spirit into the world and will manifest Donald's enduring dignity and wisdom. On behalf of Syracuse University, it's my great to welcome Donald Newhouse. . [Applause] . >> I am proud that a Newhouse graduate was selected student speaker, but Kaitlyn, you sure are a hard act to follow. . [Applause] . Thank you, Chancellor Syverud, for your kind words, but I need to correct one thing. A giant I am not. . Good about morning, trustees, Deans, members of the faculty, families of the graduates, and an especially good morning to graduates. . I grew up in the newspaper business. One of the greats of my newspaper world, the late Salsburger of the New York Times once told me a universal truth which I am happy to share with you today, and I quote, there is no such thing as a too short speech. . [Applause] . Happily for you I've taken that dictum to the heart. But this occasion, which I know has special meaning for you, has great meaning for me too. . I arrived at Syracuse as a freshman in 1947. And while I did not achieve what you have, it took me 69 years to get a degree, I am extremely moved to be here alongside you today and if you will indulge me, I'd like to tell you something about good fortune and its opposite, something about love and loss, and what it is taught me. . I was not an especially self confident young man. I came to Syracuse largely because my visionary and highly creative brother, sy, my lifelong partner and closest friend came a couple of years before. My father, who started life in a tenement on the Lower East Side of New York, did not emphasize scholarship in quite the same way he might have in a later generation. He was one of those young people, a son of an immigrant from a large struggling family, whose through brilliance and drive, hard work, luck, and a keen eye for opportunity, went from being an apprentice lawyer to a successful publisher of newspapers, from Staten Island to Long Island, Newark, to Syracuse, he began buying newspapers in a pre-digital era when newspapers were the core of a community. . Both my brother and I were eager to go to work in his fascinating newspaper world. . When I arrived at Syracuse, it was the post war years. Like so many University, Syracuse expanded to accommodate thousands of returning veterans. The campus was filled with Quonset huts acting as dormitories and classrooms. In my freshman year I was assigned a bunk in the hay lost in a barn on the grounds of the State Fair, 5 miles from campus. . I was a shy teenager and I wasn't exactly proving myself a great scholar. . I was also inpatient to begin work in my father's world. Too impatient to make my way to commencement. I left Syracuse after my sophomore year. . And so I went to work for a paper on Long Island called the Press. I learned the business side of newspapering, a world that is now as dated as Gutenburg himself, the art of typesetting, the mechanics of the presses, lead plates, acid-edged photos, barrels of black ink, tons of news print, every day the production cycle began at 4 AM and that's when I began work. . And I loved it! . To this day I still can't help but get to the office by 5, just about when you all will be getting home after tonight's celebration, I would guess. . My uncle Teddy was my coach, mentor. He taught me the business. He was rock hard and fierce and decisive. Not long after I started working for him, he went on a brief vacation. When he came back he said to me these never to be forgotten words: Donald, I have met this girl and you are going to marry her. . [Laughter] . I said, yes, Teddy. With that my life changed. . Susan Marley was her name, and our first date lasted as long as I could stretch it. From a dinner at a New York restaurant to two nightclubs, I was absolutely taken with her instantly. Susie had a dazzling smile and was charming and alive, intellectual, and boundlessly kind. And she was a Syracuse girl. . At evening's end I asked her for another date the next night, but I was broke, and so on a beautiful starry moon bright summer night we rode the Staten Island ferry, which was free. [Laughter] . And with my uncle's instructions in mind, and my desires, I asked my Susie to marry me. Susie said, you must be crazy! . And she added, I'm 18 and not going to marry until I graduate Wellesley. . Not so crazy me, five days after she graduated we were married. . [Applause] . Which brings me back to Syracuse University. After my premature exit in 1950. My Susie's parents, Lillian and Harry Marley, were Syracusans who graduated Syracuse University in the 1920s. Harry was president of Syracuse's Board of Education and had close ties with the University. Lillian and Harry's blood ran orange. They turned my dad's and my blood orange. . And in Harry's and my dad's spirit, let me here offer my hardy congratulations to the Orange's women's and men's basketball teams and to coaches Q and Jim Boeheim for making it to the final four this year. [Applause] . Syracuse University, as you know, has many great schools, all represented here by you. But you will forgive me if I speak of one that has a special place in my heart. It started with a 20-minute post breakfast meeting at The Hotel Syracuse if many the late 1950s with then Chancellor William Tolley and my dad and me at which an agreement was reached to establish the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. . [Applause] . And it runs through the dedication of Newhouse 1 by Lyndon Johnson at which the President made the historic gulf of Tonken speech, the dedication of Newhouse 2 by CBS William Paley, Newhouse 3 by chief justice John Roberts and the rededication of Newhouse 2 by Oprah, and continues today with my friendship with the school's two great Deans, David Rubin and Lorraine Branham, who deserve full credit for Newhouse being the great school it is today. . [Applause] . My marriage so Susie -- with my marriage to Susie I began a half century that was cloudless and happy in more ways than I can recount. . But because life is never cloudless, even for the very lucky, this happy story takes a turn. In 2003 my beautiful Susie was diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia, a dementia, that gradually robbed her of speech and eventually the ability to understand speech. . From 2003 to 2010 the downhill slope was gradual but unmistakable. . And then in 2010, she became incapable of taking care of herself. When you are fortunate enough to be in love for so long, to enjoy your family and work for so long, there is a feeling of power, of control, I confess to having that feeling, and I lost it. Before her dementia, my Susie and I were as one. As the disease progressed, Susie would change and plateau, change and plateau, and with each change our worlds diverged a little more. I found myself running to catch up with her and this was not a race I could possibly win. . My life's focus changed. It had to. . I could hardly spend the time I once did on work. What was now required of me was something intensely personal but absolutely essential. I had to make a single-minded effort to learn what I needed to know to make my wife's life bearable. . That required my immersing myself in the literature about the disease and extensive work with caregivers and professionals. . Like so many who face the loss of a loved one to a physical or mental condition, I had so much to learn in order to do right by my Sue at the very moment when she needed me the most. . When Sue's disease reached its ultimate stage, when she was no longer able to care for herself or to communicate with the outside world, I came to the conclusion that what she would want me to do was to play some role in finding a treatment for this horrendous dementia. . And so with the same determination I once reserved for my life's in the publishing business, I began an illuminating education in what was possible. . I did so with the help of a profoundly effective organization, the association for frontal temporal degeneration. They have helped me learn a great deal about Sue's dementia and they have pointed me to a road that hopefully might lead to a treatment for it. . From the vantage point of 86 years, I can say with some degree of confidence that many of you sooner or later will face the seemingly unexpected, the mysterious, serious events and moments in time that you hadn't figured into your plans. . And when that -- the time comes, you will have had one advantage that I did not. By finishing your education here, you have a -- you've had a prolonged experience that exposed you to complex philosophical ideas, to scientific methods, to a sense of history, to views of the human experience that only great writers and artists can provide. . That education, of course, is only a start. Your education here and the education that I hope will be a continuing process in your lives is an essential part of the equipment you will need both to contribute as professionals to the greater community and also to help you live your lives, your personal lives, in a thoughtful, productive, and decent way. . And finally, I would add a personal wish. I would hope some of you who studied in the fields of humanities and in the sciences, young as you are, will think of careers that touch on the aged, the demented and will work to find treatments for these disease or to find ways of supporting the millions upon millions of families in the United States that have been financially and psychologically devastated by the burdens placed on them by the need to care for their loved ones. . Class of 2016, I salute you, I am proud to have received my Syracuse University degree alongside of you, and I wish you great success in your pursuit of happiness. Thank you. [Applause] . >> Chancellor Syverud will now award honorary degrees for Syracuse University. Will Dean Karin Ruhlandt please present your candidate. >> Kevin Bell. Scientist, scholar, wildlife conservationist. You have dedicated your life to the better care and greater understanding and protection of all creatures great and small. Growing up with your family in the magical environment of the Bronx Zoo, where your father was bird curator, you started early on a path toward zoology. Your fieldwork has taken you to places around the globe. You have conducted research in such places as Panama, India, Africa and Iceland, with a passionate curiosity and an appreciation for the precious nature of the earth's animal beings. As CEO of Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo, you promote learning among visitors young and old, building efforts to help save species and securing support for the zoo's future. Your leadership has been sought nationally and internationally to help the advancement of zoos and conservation and guide standards for animal welfare. We are pleased to honor you for your outstanding contributions to zoology and your boundless energy and joy in the care of the world's animals. Chancellor, I have the honor to present for the degree of doctor of science, honoris causa, Kevin J. Bell. . [Applause] . >> Will Dean Diane Lyden Murphy please present your candidate. >> Floyd Little. . [Applause] . Football icon, businessman, role model and mentor. Your passion to excel defined you as a gridiron great and continues to inspire student-athletes seeking to make their own mark in sports and in life. Immortalized at Syracuse as one of the great running backs who launched the number "44" to legendary status, you carried that same drive for excellence into every endeavor. Your multifaceted career reveals a record of success built on hard work, determination, and a buoyant spirit that touches all who interact with you. A hall-of-famer in football and in life, you returned to Syracuse after a successful business career to become a key member of the athletics leadership team. As a mentor and role model to current student-athletes, you teach them to compete always with dignity and honor and to give their best in all they do. We are pleased to honor you for your extraordinary achievements and your selfless dedication to Syracuse University and to our student-athletes. and others. . Chancellor, I have the honor to present for the degree of doctor of humane letters, honoris causa, Floyd D. Little. . [Applause] . >> Will Dean Lorraine Branham please present your candidate. >> Donald Newhouse. Businessman, industry leader, philanthropist. . You have forged a remarkable legacy built on hard work, quiet leadership, and a commitment to seeding opportunity and excellence in the next generation of communicators. As president of Advance Publications, you have developed a distinct reputation for your rigorous work ethic and commitment to giving local newspapers autonomy to be responsive to community needs. Under your leadership, Newhouse-owned newspapers have won some of the most prestigious awards in the industry, including the Pulitzer Prize. A past chair of the Newspaper Association of America, you earned its highest honor, the Katharine Graham Lifetime Achievement Award. Your philanthropy has touched countless lives as well. Along with your beloved wife, Susan, and family, you have provided generous support for the arts, medical institutions, schools, and charitable groups. At Syracuse, your support for the school that bears your father's name is legendary and its impact incalculable. We are pleased to honor you for your outstanding professional achievements, your generous spirit, and your steadfast dedication to Syracuse University. Chancellor, I have the honor to present for the degree of doctor of letters, honoris causa, Donald E. Newhouse. . [Applause] . >> Will Dean Karin Ruhlandt please present your candidate. >> Tobias Wolff. Writer, teacher, mentor. Your poignant works of prose have distinguished you as one of the great truth-tellers of our time. As a short-story craftsman and memoirist, you stand among the most influential writers of the day, with a distinctive voice that is spare yet graceful, and always deeply authentic. From your unflinching recounting of your childhood in the best-selling This Boy's Life, to your most recent collections, you have earned numerous awards for your work. In 2015, President Barack Obama presented you with the National Medal of Arts. You also were instrumental in building the success of Syracuse University's creative writing program. Many of your protégés from the program would go on to become acclaimed writers and mentors themselves. Your capacity to discover top talent and your continued support for former colleagues and students advanced a legacy of excellence that endures today. We are pleased to honor you for your superb body of work and lasting impact on your field and on those who have the good fortune to learn from you. Chancellor, I have the honor to present for the degree of doctor of humane letters, honoris causa, Tobias Wolff. . [Applause] . >> Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome chairman of the Syracuse University Board of Trustees, Steven W. Barnes. . [Applause] . >> What a wonderful and proud day. . It is now time to conferee merry Tuesday status to our distinguished faculty members. . Please rise as your name is read. Bruce James Abbey. Professor, Architecture. School of Architecture. Kristi Andersen. Professor, Political Science. Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Karen M. Bakke. Associate Professor, School of Design. College of Visual and Performing Arts. Ann C. Clarke. Dean and Associate Professor. College of Visual and Performing Arts. Edward Lipson. Professor, Physics. College of Arts and Sciences. Arthur W. McDonald. Professor, Architecture. School of Architecture. Upon recommendation of the University Senate and on behalf of the Board of Trustees, I confer upon each of you the status of emeritus faculty. Ladies and gentlemen, please join me again in thanking these dedicated individuals. . [Applause] . Thank you. . >> Now we will begin to confer doctoral degrees. All doctoral candidates will remain standing facing the platform after their degrees are conferred so that they may come to the platform to be greeted personally by Chancellor Syverud. Interim Dean Peter Vanable will present candidates for the doctoral degree in the Graduate School of Syracuse University. >> Candidates for the doctoral degrees at Syracuse University, please rise and come forward. >> Chancellor Syverud, I have the honor to present these candidates as qualified to receive their degrees. >> Following action by the University Senate and authorization by the Board of Trustees of Syracuse University, I now confer upon each of you the degree appropriate to your course of study. The diploma you have earned gives you all the rights, responsibilities, and honors. pertaining to that degree. Congratulations! . [Applause] . >> Will the doctoral degree recipients please come forward to be greeted by Chancellor Syverud. [Graduate Names] . [Applause] . >> Ladies and Gentlemen, the College of Law graduates, including Juris Doctor and Master of Laws in American Law candidates, received their degrees on Friday. We recognize and congratulate those graduates and the College of Law Interim Dean, William Banks. [Applause] >> Candidates for Master's degrees and Certificates of Advanced Studies at Syracuse University will be presented by Interim Dean Peter Vanable. >> Candidates for Master's degrees and Certificates of Advanced Studies at Syracuse University, please rise. . [Applause] . Chancellor Syverud, I have the honor to present these candidates as qualified to receive their degrees. >> Following action by the University Senate and authorization by the Board of Trustees of Syracuse University, I now confer upon each of you the degree appropriate to your course of study. The diploma you have earned gives you all the rights, responsibilities, and honors pertaining to that degree. Congratulations! . [Applause] . >> Thank you, you can now be seated. . >> The Environmental Science and Forestry college scholars, the Syracuse University. scholars, and the two class marshals will please rise and come up to the platform. to be greeted by Chancellor Syverud and President Wheeler. Chancellor Syverud and President Wheeler, I have the great honor to present these candidates who were selected from a field of outstanding representatives of the Class of 2016. . [Applause] . Fiction we have our SUNY ESF scholars. . John Swartzfager Denali Trimble We now have our Syracuse University scholars. . Alice Blank Lis Chan Cora Cool-Mihalyi Adrian Hatch Kaitlyn Hobson Terry Jones Eun-Jin Keish Kim Mailyn Nishiguchi Verónica Ortiz-Calderón Robert Swanda Samantha Usman Joshua Woods . >> Now our class marshals. . Alexis Peña Tatiana Williams >> I would like everyone to know that candidates in the Army and Air Force ROTC programs were commissioned as Second Lieutenants at a service in Hendricks Chapel Friday evening. Will they please stand and be recognized? [Applause] We wish you well as you go to serve and protect our country. >> Will the academic deans of the schools and colleges of Syracuse University presenting candidates for the associate and baccalaureate degrees please Come forward after I announce the name of each dean, will their degree candidates rise and remain standing. . Dean Karin Ruhlandt and Dean James Steinberg. Will the degree candidates from the College of Arts and Sciences and Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs please rise? . [Applause] . Dean Ann Clarke. Will the degree candidates from the College of Visual and Performing Arts please rise? Dean Teresa Dahlberg. Will the degree candidates from the College of Engineering and Computer Science please rise? Interim Dean Jeffrey Stanton. Will the degree candidates from the School of Information Studies please rise? Dean Kenneth Kavajecz. Will the degree candidates from the Martin J. Whitman School of Management please rise? Dean Lorraine Branham. Will the degree candidates from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications please rise? Dean Michael Speaks. Will the degree candidates from the School of Architecture please rise? Dean Diane Lyden Murphy. Will the degree candidates from the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics please rise? Dean Joanna Masingila. Will the degree candidates from the School of Education please rise? Dean Bea Gonzalez. Will the degree candidates receiving a professional studies degree from University College please rise? Representing the academic deans, Associate Provost Andria Costello Staniec will present the candidates for associate and baccalaureate degrees from all the schools and colleges. >> Chancellor Syverud, I have the honor to present these candidates as most worthy to receive their degrees. >> Associate Provost Costello Staniec. Following action by the University Senate and authorization by the Board of Trustees of Syracuse University, I now confer upon each of you the degree appropriate to your course of study. The diploma you have earned gives you all the rights, responsibilities, and honors pertaining to that degree. You may now move the tassels on your mortarboards to the left. [Applause] . >> Immediately following today's ceremony, the Chancellor will proceed to Hendricks Chapel to be available to take photos with degree recipients and family members. And now we ask all of our graduates and their guests to remain standing or rise for the Alma Mater and continue to remain standing for the recessional. The Alma Mater will be led by Maria Whitcomb, who is receiving a bachelor's degree in vocal performance from the College of Visual and Performing Arts. [Music] Where the vale of Onondaga Meets the eastern sky Proudly stands our Alma mater On her hilltop high. Flag we love! Orange! Float for aye - Old Syracuse, o'er thee Loyal be thy sons and daughters To thy memory. [Cheering]

Contents

Background

Under the provisions of the New York Constitution of 1894, re-apportioned in 1917, 51 Senators and 150 assemblymen were elected in single-seat districts. The senatorial districts consisted either of one or more entire counties; or a contiguous area within a single county. The counties which were divided into more than one senatorial district were New York (nine districts), Kings (eight), Bronx (three), Erie (three), Monroe (two), Queens (two) and Westchester (two). The Assembly districts were made up of contiguous area, all within the same county.

In November 1937, an amendment to the State Constitution to increase the term in office of the members of the New York State Assembly to two years, and of the statewide elected state officers (Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Comptroller, Attorney General) to four years, was accepted. Thus, beginning at the state election in 1938, all members (senators and assemblymen) of the Legislature were elected to two-year terms.

At this time there were two major political parties: the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. The American Labor Party, the Socialist Party and the Communist Party also nominated tickets. The Socialist Labor Party nominated an "Industrial Government" ticket. The Republicans also nominated an "Independent Progressive" ticket so that their nominee Thomas E. Dewey would appear in two columns on the ballot, like Gov. Lehman who was endorsed by the American Labor Party. In New York City, "City Fusion", "Progressive" and "Liberal" tickets were also nominated.

Elections

The New York state election, 1938, was held on November 8. Governor Herbert H. Lehman was re-elected, and Charles Poletti was elected Lieutenant Governor, both Democrats endorsed by the American Labor Party. The other six statewide elective offices were also carried by the Democrats. The approximate party strength at this election, as expressed by the vote for Governor, was: Republicans 2,303,000; Democrats 1,971,000; American Labor 420,000; Communists 106,000;[1] Socialists 25,000; Independent Progressives 24,000; and Industrial Government 3,500.

Both woman legislators—State Senator Rhoda Fox Graves (Rep.), of Gouverneur, and Assemblywoman Jane H. Todd (Rep.), of Tarrytown—were re-elected.

The New York state election, 1939, was held on November 7. Two vacancies in the State Senate and six vacancies in the State Assembly were filled. Edith C. Cheney, the widow of Assemblyman Guy W. Cheney, was elected to the seat previously held by her husband.

Sessions

The Legislature met for the first regular session (the 162nd) at the State Capitol in Albany on January 4, 1939; and adjourned on May 20.[2]

Oswald D. Heck (Rep.) was re-elected Speaker.

Perley A. Pitcher (Rep.) was elected Temporary President of the State Senate. Pitcher died on February 20, 1939.

On February 27, 1939, Joe R. Hanley (Rep.) was elected Temporary President of the State Senate.

The Legislature met for a special session at the State Capitol in Albany on June 23, 1939;[3] and adjourned on July 10.[4] This session was called because the New York Court of Appeals had declared the state budget, enacted during the regular session, as unconstitutional, and a new budget was required to be made.

The Legislature met for the second regular session (the 163rd) at the State Capitol in Albany on January 3, 1940; and adjourned at half past midnight on March 31.[5]

The Legislature met for another special session at the State Capitol in Albany on October 22, 1940; and adjourned after a session of four hours. This session was held to enact an extension of three hours to the voting time on the next election day, so that the polls would close at 9 p.m. instead of at 6 p.m.[6]

On November 16, the State Senate rejected, with a vote of 29 to 18, the removal from office of Kings County Judge George W. Martin.[7]

State Senate

Districts

Members

The asterisk (*) denotes members of the previous Legislature who continued in office as members of this Legislature. Peter H. Ruvolo, Phelps Phelps, Carl Pack, Fred A. Young and James W. Riley changed from the Assembly to the Senate at the beginning of this Legislature. Assemblymen Daniel Gutman and Chauncey B. Hammond were elected to fill vacancies in the Senate.

Note: For brevity, the chairmanships omit the words "...the Committee on (the)..."

District Senator Party Notes
1st George L. Thompson* Republican Chairman of Finance
2nd Joseph D. Nunan, Jr.* Democrat
3rd Peter T. Farrell* Democrat
4th Philip M. Kleinfeld* Dem./Am. Labor
5th John J. Howard* Democrat
6th Edward J. Coughlin* Democrat
7th Jacob J. Schwartzwald* Democrat
8th Joseph A. Esquirol* Dem./Progr.
9th Peter H. Ruvolo* Dem./C.F./Progr. resigned on September 30, 1939[8]
Daniel Gutman Democrat on November 7, 1939, elected to fill vacancy
10th Jeremiah F. Twomey* Democrat
11th James J. Crawford* Dem./Rep.
12th Elmer F. Quinn* Democrat
13th Phelps Phelps* Democrat
14th William J. Murray* Dem./Progr.
15th John L. Buckley* Dem./Lib.
16th John J. McNaboe* Democrat
17th Frederic R. Coudert, Jr. Rep./City F.
18th John T. McCall* Democrat
19th Charles D. Perry Democrat
20th A. Spencer Feld* Democrat
21st Lazarus Joseph* Dem./Lib.
22nd Carl Pack* Dem./City F.
23rd John J. Dunnigan* Dem./City F. Minority Leader
24th Rae L. Egbert* Democrat
25th Pliny W. Williamson* Republican
26th William F. Condon Republican Chairman of Labor and Industry
27th Thomas C. Desmond* Republican
28th Allan A. Ryan, Jr. Republican
29th Arthur H. Wicks* Rep./Soc.
30th Erastus Corning 2nd* Democrat
31st Clifford C. Hastings* Republican
32nd Gilbert T. Seelye Republican Chairman of Pensions
33rd Benjamin F. Feinberg* Republican Chairman of Judiciary
34th Rhoda Fox Graves* Rep./Am. Labor
35th Fred A. Young Republican
36th William H. Hampton* Republican
37th Perley A. Pitcher* Republican elected Temporary President; died on February 20, 1939
Isaac B. Mitchell Republican elected on March 28, 1939, to fill vacancy[9]
38th William C. Martin Republican
39th Walter W. Stokes* Republican
40th Roy M. Page* Republican
41st C. Tracey Stagg* Republican committed suicide on July 14, 1939
Chauncey B. Hammond Republican on November 7, 1939, elected to fill vacancy
42nd Henry W. Griffith Republican
43rd Earle S. Warner* Republican
44th Joe R. Hanley* Republican on February 27, 1939, elected Temporary President
45th Rodney B. Janes Republican
46th Karl K. Bechtold Republican Chairman of Civil Service
47th William Bewley Republican
48th Walter J. Mahoney* Republican
49th Stephen J. Wojtkowiak* Dem./Am. Labor
50th Arthur L. Swartz Republican died on May 14, 1940
51st James W. Riley* Republican Chairman of Penal Institutions

Employees

State Assembly

Assemblymen

Note: For brevity, the chairmanships omit the words "...the Committee on (the)..."

District Assemblymen Party Notes
Albany 1st George W. Foy* Democrat
2nd John P. Hayes* Democrat
3rd John McBain Republican
Allegany William H. MacKenzie* Republican
Bronx 1st Matthew J. H. McLaughlin* Dem./City F.
2nd Patrick J. Fogarty* Dem./Lib.
3rd Arthur Wachtel Dem./City F.
4th Isidore Dollinger* Dem./City F.
5th Julius J. Gans Dem./City F.
6th Peter A. Quinn* Dem./City F.
7th Louis Bennett Dem./City F.
8th John A. Devany, Jr.* Democrat
Broome 1st Edward F. Vincent* Republican died on October 26, 1940
2nd Edward W. Walters Republican
Cattaraugus William B. Kingsbury Republican
Cayuga James H. Chase Republican
Chautauqua 1st Lloyd J. Babcock* Republican Chairman of Pensions
2nd Carl E. Darling* Republican
Chemung Chauncey B. Hammond* Republican Chairman of Penal Institutions; resigned on July 27, 1939
Harry J. Tifft Republican on November 7, 1939, elected to fill vacancy
Chenango Irving M. Ives* Republican Majority Leader
Clinton Leslie G. Ryan Republican
Columbia Frederick A. Washburn* Republican Chairman of Labor and Industries
Cortland Harold L. Creal Republican
Delaware William T. A. Webb* Republican
Dutchess 1st Howard N. Allen* Republican
2nd Emerson D. Fite* Republican Chairman of Civil Service
Erie 1st Frank A. Gugino* Republican
2nd Harold B. Ehrlich* Rep./Am. Labor
3rd William J. Butler* Republican
4th Anthony J. Canney* Democrat
5th Joseph S. Kaszubowski Democrat
6th Jerome C. Kreinheder* Republican
7th Charles O. Burney, Jr.* Republican
8th R. Foster Piper* Republican
Essex Sheldon F. Wickes Republican
Franklin William L. Doige Republican
Fulton and Hamilton Denton D. Lake* Republican Chairman of Aviation
Genesee Herbert A. Rapp* Republican
Greene Paul Fromer* Republican resigned on August 7, 1939
William E. Brady Republican on November 7, 1939, elected to fill vacancy
Herkimer Leo A. Lawrence* Republican
Jefferson Russell Wright* Rep./Am. Labor
Kings 1st Crawford W. Hawkins* Democrat
2nd Leo F. Rayfiel Democrat
3rd Michael J. Gillen* Democrat
4th Bernard Austin* Democrat
5th Charles R. McConnell* Democrat
6th Robert J. Crews* Rep./Am. Labor
7th William Kirnan* Democrat
8th Charles J. Beckinella* Dem./City F.
9th Edgar F. Moran* Democrat
10th William C. McCreery* Dem./City F.
11th Bernard J. Moran* Democrat
12th James W. Feely Democrat
13th Ralph Schwartz* Democrat
14th Aaron F. Goldstein Dem./Lib.
15th John Smolenski* Democrat
16th Carmine J. Marasco Democrat
17th Fred G. Moritt* Democrat
18th Irwin Steingut* Dem./Am. L./Progr. Minority Leader
19th Max M. Turshen* Democrat
20th Roy H. Rudd* Dem./Rep./Progr.
21st Charles H. Breitbart* Democrat resigned on October 7, 1939, to run for Municipal Court
Thomas A. Dwyer Democrat on November 7, 1939, elected to fill vacancy
22nd Daniel Gutman Dem./C. F./Progr. resigned on October 4, 1939, to run for the State Senate
James A. Corcoran Democrat on November 7, 1939, elected to fill vacancy
23rd Robert Giordano Dem./City F.
Lewis Benjamin H. Demo Republican
Livingston James J. Wadsworth* Republican
Madison Wheeler Milmoe* Republican
Monroe 1st Frank J. Sellmayer, Jr.* Republican
2nd Abraham Schulman* Republican
3rd George T. Manning Republican
4th Pat E. Provenzano* Republican
5th Walter H. Wickins* Republican resigned on October 2, 1939
William B. Mann Republican on November 7, 1939, elected to fill vacancy
Montgomery L. James Shaver* Republican
Nassau 1st John D. Bennett* Republican
2nd Norman F. Penny Republican
New York 1st James J. Dooling* Democrat
2nd Louis J. Capozzoli Democrat on November 5, 1940, elected to the 77th U.S. Congress
3rd Maurice E. Downing Democrat
4th Leonard Farbstein* Dem./Progr./Lib.
5th Owen McGivern Democrat
6th Meyer Goldberg* Rep./Am. Labor
7th Irwin D. Davidson Democrat
8th Stephen J. Jarema* Democrat
9th Ira H. Holley* Dem./City F.
10th MacNeil Mitchell* Republican
11th Patrick H. Sullivan* Democrat
12th Edmund J. Delany* Democrat
13th William J. Sheldrick* Democrat
14th Francis J. McCaffrey, Jr.* Dem./C. F./Progr.
15th Abbot Low Moffat* Rep./City F. Chairman of Ways and Means
16th Robert F. Wagner, Jr.* Dem./Am. Labor
17th Oscar Garcia Rivera* Am. Labor[10]
18th Joseph A. Boccia Rep./Am. Labor
19th Daniel L. Burrows Dem./City F.
20th Anthony Guida Dem./Am. L./C. F.
21st William T. Andrews* Dem./Am. Labor
22nd Daniel Flynn* Democrat
23rd William J. A. Glancy* Democrat
Niagara 1st Fayette E. Pease* Republican
2nd Harry D. Suitor* Republican
Oneida 1st John J. Walsh* Dem./Am. Labor
2nd William R. Williams* Republican
3rd C. Dean Williams* Republican
Onondaga 1st Leo W. Breed* Republican
2nd George B. Parsons* Republican
3rd Frank J. Costello* Republican
Ontario Harry R. Marble* Republican
Orange 1st Lee B. Mailler* Republican
2nd Charles N. Hammond* Republican
Orleans John S. Thompson* Republican
Oswego Ernest J. Lonis* Republican
Otsego Chester T. Backus* Republican
Putnam D. Mallory Stephens* Republican
Queens 1st Mario J. Cariello* Democrat
2nd George F. Torsney Democrat
3rd John V. Downey* Democrat
4th Daniel E. Fitzpatrick* Democrat
5th John H. Ferril Democrat
6th Joseph P. Teagle* Democrat
Rensselaer 1st Philip J. Casey* Democrat
2nd Maurice Whitney* Republican
Richmond 1st Charles Bormann* Democrat
2nd Albert V. Maniscalco Democrat
Rockland Lawrence J. Murray, Jr.* Democrat seat vacated on April 4, 1940, when convicted for
embezzlement,[11] sentenced to 5 to 10 years in prison[12]
St. Lawrence 1st Grant F. Daniels Republican
2nd Warren O. Daniels* Republican
Saratoga Richard J. Sherman* Republican
Schenectady 1st Oswald D. Heck* Republican re-elected Speaker; Chairman of Rules
2nd Harold Armstrong* Republican
Schoharie Arthur L. Parsons* Republican
Schuyler Dutton S. Peterson* Republican
Seneca Lawrence W. Van Cleef* Republican
Steuben 1st Guy W. Cheney* Republican died on April 18, 1939
Edith C. Cheney Rep./Am. Labor on November 7, 1939, elected to fill vacancy
2nd William M. Stuart* Republican
Suffolk 1st Edmund R. Lupton* Republican
2nd Elisha T. Barrett* Republican
Sullivan James G. Lyons Democrat
Tioga Myron D. Albro* Republican
Tompkins Stanley C. Shaw* Republican
Ulster J. Edward Conway* Republican
Warren Harry A. Reoux* Republican Chairman of Judiciary
Washington Herbert A. Bartholomew* Republican
Wayne Harry L. Averill* Republican
Westchester 1st Christopher H. Lawrence* Republican
2nd Theodore Hill, Jr.* Republican
3rd James E. Owens* Republican
4th Jane H. Todd* Republican
5th Malcolm Wilson Republican
Wyoming Harold C. Ostertag* Republican Chairman of Affairs of Villages
Yates Fred S. Hollowell* Republican

Employees

Notes

  1. ^ The Communists did not nominate a candidate for Governor; this is the vote polled by Israel Amter who ran for U.S. Representative at-large.
  2. ^ $150,000,00 HOUSING VOTED AS LEGISLATURE ADJOURNS in The New York Times on May 21, 1939 (subscription required)
  3. ^ Lehman Asks Full Funds to Schools and Highways in The New York Times on June 24, 1939 (subscription required)
  4. ^ ALBANY TO TAKE UP SCHOOLS CUT TODAY in The New York Times on July 10, 1939 (subscription required)
  5. ^ New Truce is Made in The New York Times on March 31, 1940 (subscription required)
  6. ^ Legislature Adds 3 Hours to Voting in The New York Times on October 23, 1940 (subscription required)
  7. ^ Martin is Cleared by Senate, 28 TO 19, in Removal Vote in The New York Times on November 17, 1939 (subscription required)
  8. ^ SENATOR RUVOLO RESIGNS in The New York Times on October 1, 1939 (subscription required)
  9. ^ DAIRYMAN IS ELECTED AS STATE SENATOR in The New York Times on March 29, 1939 (subscription required)
  10. ^ Garcia-Rivera had been elected as a Republican with American Labor endorsement in 1937. In 1938, the Republicans refused to renominate him, and he was re-elected on the American Labor ticket only; see REPUBLICANS DROP AN ASSEMBLYMAN in The New York Times on June 30, 1938 (subscription required)
  11. ^ MURRAY CONVICTED IN THEFT OF $49,102 in The New York Times on April 5, 1940 (subscription required)
  12. ^ MURRAY IS SENTENCED TO 5 TO 10 YEAR TERM in The New York Times on April 6, 1940 (subscription required)

Sources

This page was last edited on 30 November 2018, at 17:57
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.