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14th Senate of Spain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

14th Senate of Spain
13th 15th
Senado fachada Madrid.jpg
Overview
Meeting placePalacio del Senado
Term3 December 2019 (2019-12-03) –
Election10 November 2019
GovernmentSánchez
Websitesenado.es
Senators
SpainSenateDiagram2019-11.svg
Members265
PresidentPilar Llop (PSOE)
First Vice-PresidentCristina Narbona (PSOE)
Second Vice-PresidentPío García-Escudero (PP)
First SecretaryFrancisco Fajardo (PSOE)
Second SecretaryImanol Landa (EAJ)
Third SecretaryRafael Hernando (PP)
Fourth SecretaryCristina Ayala (PP)

The 14th Senate of Spain is the current meeting of the Senate of Spain, the upper house of the Spanish Cortes Generales, with the membership determined primarily by the results of the general election held on 10 November 2019. The Senate met for the first time on 3 December 2019. According to the Constitution of Spain the maximum legislative term of the senate is 4 years from the preceding election.

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • ✪ Fall of The Roman Empire...in the 15th Century: Crash Course World History #12
  • ✪ Separation of Powers and Checks and Balances: Crash Course Government and Politics #3
  • ✪ Julius Caesar: Rubicon to Rome
  • ✪ U.S. History | 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments
  • ✪ VOA news for Saturday, October 28th, 2017

Transcription

Hi there, my name’s John Green; this is crash course: world history, and today we’re going to talk about the fall of Rome. Mr. Green, Mr. Green, Mr. Green! Who’s that pretty lady? That lady, me-from-the-past, is Emperor Justinian. We’ll get to him in a minute. [music intro] [music intro] [music intro] [music intro] [music intro] [music intro] How and when Rome fell remains the subject of considerable historical debate— but today I’m going to argue that the Rome didn’t really fully fall until the middle of the 15th century. But first, let me introduce you to The Traditional View: Barbarians at the Gates. My, don’t you look traditional? If you want to be really technical about it, the city of Rome was conquered by bar bar bar barbarians in 476 CE. There was a last Roman Emperor Romulus Augustus, who ruled the empire for less than a year before being deposed and sent into exile by Odoacer, who was some kind of barbarian- we don’t know for sure. Ostrogoth, Hun, Visigoth, Vandals; they all looked the same to the Romans. Rome had been sacked by barbarians before, most notably by Alaric the Visigoth in 410- Is it Uh-lar-ick or Uh-lair-ick? The dictionary says Uh-lair-ick but The Vampire Diaries say Uh-lar-ick so I’m going to go with Uh-lar-ick. But anyway, after 476, there was never again a “Roman” emperor in Rome. Then there’s the hipper anti-imperialistic argument— that’s nice, but if you really want to go full hipster you should probably deny that you’re being hipst— right, exactly—which goes like this: Rome was doomed to fall as soon as it spread outside of Italy because the further the territory is from the capital, the harder it is to govern. Thus imperialism itself sowed the seeds of destruction in Rome. This was the argument put forth by the Roman historian Tacitus, although he put it in the mouth of a British chieftain. That sounded dirty, but it’s not, it’s all about context here on Crash Course: "To robbery, slaughter, plunder, they give the lying name of empire; they make a desert and call it peace.” There are two ways to overcome this governance problem: First, you rule with the proverbial topaz fist— that’s not the proverb? Really, Stan? It’s an iron fist? But topaz is much harder than iron. Don’t these people know their Mohs scale of mineral hardness?.. Regardless, the Romans couldn’t do this because their whole identity was wrapped up in an idea of justice that precluded indiscriminate violence. The other strategy is to try to incorporate conquered people into the empire more fully: In Rome’s case, to make them Romans. This worked really well in the early days of the Republic and even at the beginning of the Empire. But it eventually led to Barbarians inside the Gates. The decline of the legions started long before Rome started getting sacked. It really began with the extremely bad decision to incorporate Germanic warriors into the Roman Army. Rome had a long history of absorbing people from the empire’s fringes into the polity first by making them allies and then eventually by granting them full citizenship rights. But usually these “foreign” citizens had developed ties to Rome itself; they learned Latin, they bought into the whole idea of the aristocratic republic. But by the 3rd and 4th centuries CE, though, the empire had been forced to allow the kind of riffraff into their army who didn’t really care about the idea of Rome itself. They were only loyal to their commanders. —And as you no doubt remember from the historical examples of Caesar, Pompey, Marius, contemporary Afghanistan— this is not a recipe for domestic bliss. So here is Rome, stuck with a bunch of expensive and bloody wars against Germanic peoples who were really good at fighting and then they had a great idea: Why not fight with these guys? So they essentially hired them and soon the Roman Legions were teeming with these mercenaries who were loyal mostly to gold, secondarily to their commanders, and not at all to Rome which is a place that very few of them ever even saw. I mean, why would they give a crap about the health and well-being of the empire? Am I allowed to say crap, Stan? Nice. This was of course a recipe for civil war, and that’s exactly what happened with general after general after general declaring himself Emperor of Rome. So there was very little stability in the West. For instance, between 235 and 284 CE, 41 different people were either emperor or claimed to be emperor. And after the year 200, many of the generals who were powerful enough to proclaim themselves emperors weren’t even Roman. In fact, a lot of them didn’t speak much Latin. Oddly enough, one of the best symbols of the new face of the Roman Empire was sartorial. Instead of the traditional tunic and toga of the glory days of the Senate, most of the new general-emperors adopted that most practical and most barbaric of garments: pants. Oh, which reminds me, it’s time for the Open Letter. An Open Letter to Pants: Dear Pants, Although you eventually became a symbol of patriarchal oppression, in your early days you were worn by both men and women. And in the days of the Roman Republic, they hated you. They thought you barbarous. They thought that people wearing you was the definition of people lacking civilization. They ventured north and the wind blew up through their togas and lo and behold, they adopted pants. And there’s a history lesson in that, pants, which is that when people have to choose between civilization and warm genitals, they choose warm genitals. Best Wishes, John Green And now a note from our sponsor: Today’s episode of crash course is brought o you by the all-new Oldsmobile Byzantium, mixing power and luxury in a way- Really? Oldsmobile isn’t a company anymore? And Byzantium is a place? Are you sure? So remember when I said the Roman Empire survived til the 15th century? Well that was the Eastern Roman Empire, commonly known as the Byzantine Empire (although not by the people who lived in it who identified themselves as Romans). So while the Western empire descended into chaos, the eastern half of the Empire had its capital in Byzantium, a city on the Bosporus Strait that Constantine would later rename Constantinople, thereby paving the way for They Might Be Giants only mainstream hit. Constantine had lots of reasons to move his capitol east. For one thing he was born in modern-day Croatia, also he probably spoke better Greek than Latin, and plus the eastern provinces were a lot richer than the Western provinces and from a looting perspective, you just want to be closer to where the good warring is. The enemies in the East, like the Persian Parthians and the Persian Sassanians, were real empires, not just bands of warriors. And no matter who you were in world history, if you wanted to make a name for yourself in terms of war, you really needed to be up against the Persians. EVEN IF you were— wait for it— the Mongols. Not this time, friends. As the political center of the Roman Empire shifted east, Constantine also tried to re-orient his new religion, Christianity, toward the east, holding the first Church council in Nicaea in 325. The idea was to get all Christians to believe the same thing- that worked- but it did mark the beginning of the emperor having greater control over the Church. That trend would of course later lead to tensions between the church centered at Constantinople and the one centered in Rome. But, more on that in a bit. To give you a sense of how dramatic this shift was, by the 4th century CE, Constantinople’s population had soared while Rome’s had gone from 500,000 to 80,000. And although the Byzantines spoke Greek not Latin, they considered themselves Romans and if they did then we probably should too. Let’s go to the Thought Bubble. There was a lot of continuity between the old, Western Roman Empire, and the new, Eastern one. Politically, each was ruled by a single (sometimes there were two, and once there were four– but let’s forget about them for now) who wielded absolute military power. War was pretty much constant as the Byzantines fought the Persian Sassanian Empire and then various Islamic empires. Trade and valuable agricultural land that yielded high taxes meant that the Byzantine Empire was like the Western Roman Empire, exceptionally rich, and it was slightly more compact as a territory than its predecessor and much more urban, containing as it did all of those once independent Greek city states, which made it easier to administer. Also like their Western counterparts, the Byzantines enjoyed spectacle and sport. Chariot races in Constantinople were huge, with thousands turning out at the Hippodrome to cheer on their favorites. Big bets were placed and there was a huge rivalry not just about sports but also about political affiliations between the two main teams, the Blues and the Greens- Thanks for putting us on the Greens, Thought Bubble. That rivalry was so heated that riots often broke out between them. In one such riot, an estimated 30,000 people were killed. Thanks Thought Bubble. But perhaps the most consistently Roman aspect of Byzantine society was that they followed Roman law. The Romans always prided themselves on being ruled by laws, not by men, and even though that’s not actually the case after the second century BCE, there’s no question that the Eastern Roman Empire’s codification of Roman laws was one of it’s greatest achievements. And much of the credit for that goes to the most famous Byzantine Emperor, at least after Constantine, Justinian. I like your brooch, sir. In 533 Justinian published the Digest, an 800,000-word condensation of 1,528 Latin law books. And to go along with this he published the Institutes, which was like a curriculum for the Roman law schools that existed all through the Empire. Justinian, incidentally, was by far the most awesome of the Byzantine emperors. He was like the David Tennant of doctors. He was born a peasant somewhere in the Balkans and than rose to became emperor in 527. He ruled for almost 30 years and in addition to codifying Roman law, he did a lot to restore the former glory of the Roman Empire. He took Carthage back, he even took Rome back from the Goths, although not for long. And he’s responsible for the building of one of the great churches in all of time— which is now a mosque— the Hagia Sophia or Church of Saint Wisdom. So after one of those sporting riots destroyed the previous church, he built this, which with its soaring domes became a symbol for the wealth and opulence of his empire. The Romans were remarkable builders and engineers and the Hagia Sophia is no exception: a dome its equal wouldn’t be build for another 500 years. But you would never mistake it for a Roman temple; It doesn’t have the austerity or the emphasis on engineering that you see, for instance, the Coliseum. And this building in many ways functions a symbol for the ways the Eastern Roman Empire was both Roman and not. But maybe the most interesting thing Justinian ever did was be married to his controversial Theater Person of a wife, Theodora. Hey Danica, can we get Theodora up here? Wow that is perfect. It’s funny how married couples always look like each other. Theodora began her career as an actress, dancer, and possible prostitute before become Empress. And she may have saved her husband’s rule by convincing him not to flee the city during riots between the Blues and Greens. She also mentored a eunuch who went on to become a hugely important general- Mentoring a eunuch sounds like a euphemism, but it’s not. And she fought to expand the rights of women in divorce and property ownership, and even had a law passed taking the bold stance that adulterous women should not be executed. So, in short, the Byzantines continued the Roman legacy of empire and war and law for almost 1000 years after Romulus Augustus was driven out of Rome. The Byzantines may not have spoken Latin, and few of their emperors came from Rome, but in most important ways they were Romans. Except one REALLY IMPORTANT way. The Byzantines followed a different form of Christianity, the branch we now call Eastern or sometimes Greek Orthodox. How there came to be a split between the Catholic and Orthodox traditions is complicated – you might even say Byzantine. What matters for us are the differences between the churches, the main doctrinal one being about the dating of Easter, and the main political one being about who rules whom. Did I get my whom right there, Stan? YES! In the West there was a Pope and in the East there was a Patriarch. The Pope is the head of the Roman Catholic Church. He sort of serves as god’s regent on earth and he doesn’t answer to any secular ruler. And ever since the fall of Rome, there has been a lot of tension in Western Europe between Popes and kings over who should have the real power. But in the Orthodox church they didn’t have that problem because the Patriarch was always appointed by the Emperor. So it was pretty clear who had control over the church, so much that they even have a word for it- caesaropapism: Caesar over Pope. But the fact that in Rome there was no emperor after 476 meant there was no one to challenge the Pope, which would profoundly shape European history over the next, like, 1200 years. So I would argue that in some important ways, the Roman Empire survived for a thousand years after it left Rome, but in some ways it still survives today. It survives in our imagination when we think of this as east and this as west; It survives in football rivalries that have their roots in religious conflicts; and it survives in the Justinian law code which continues to be the basis for much of civil law in Europe. Next week we’ll talk about the emergence of Islam over here... How’d I do, Stan? Well, you can’t win ‘em all. Thanks for watching. Crash Course is produced and directed by Stan Muller, our script supervisor is Danica Johnson. The show is written by my high school history teacher Raoul Meyer and myself and our graphics team is Thought Bubble. Last week’s Phrase of the Week was “Aristotelian logic”. You can guess this week’s Phrase of the Week or suggest new ones in Comments, where you can also ask questions that our team of historians will endeavor to answer. Thanks for watching, and as we say in my hometown, Don’t forget to be awesome.

Contents

Election

The 14th Spanish general election was held on 10 November 2019. At the election the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) remained the largest party in the Senate but fell short of a majority again.

Alliance Seats +/–
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party 93 Decrease30
People's Party 83 Increase29
Republican Left of Catalonia–SovereigntistsRepublican Left of the Valencian Country 11 Steady
Basque Nationalist Party 9 Steady
Citizens 0 Decrease4
Others/blanks 12 Increase5
Total 208 Steady

History

The new senate met for the first time on 3 December 2019 and after two rounds of voting Pilar Llop (PSOE) was elected as President of the Senate of Spain.[1][2]

Other members of the Bureau of the Senate were also elected on 3 December 2019: Cristina Narbona (PSOE), First Vice-President; Pío García-Escudero (PP), Second Vice-President; Francisco Fajardo (PSOE), First Secretary; Imanol Landa (EAJ), Second Secretary; Rafael Hernando (PP), Third Secretary; and Cristina Ayala (PP), Fourth Secretary.[3][4]

Deaths, resignations and regional legislature appointments

The 14th senate has seen the following deaths, resignations and regional legislature appointments:

Appointed senators

Members

Name Constituency No. Votes Party Alliance Group Took office Left office Notes
Patricia Abascal Ibiza-Formentera 1 15,574 PSIB PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Sofía Acedo Melilla 2 9,080 PP PP People's 10 November 2019
María Adrio Pontevedra 2 160,446 PSdeG PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Ana Agudíez Segovia 1 25,891 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Carolina Agudo Castilla-La Mancha - Appointed PPCM PP People's 23 July 2019[a]
José Aguilar Málaga 3 209,692 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Nerea Ahedo Biscay 1 230,304 EAJ-PNV Basque 10 November 2019
Antonio Alarcó Tenerife 1 94,195 PPC PP People's 10 November 2019
Rosa Aldea Palencia 1 31,890 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Francisco Alegre Catalonia - Appointed Cs Cs Citizens 4 May 2018[a]
María Alía Toledo 2 122,152 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019
Jesús Alonso Soria 1 16,263 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Ana Alós Huesca 1 37,769 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
María Álvarez Asturias - Appointed FSA PSOE Socialists 28 November 2019
Asier Antona Canaries - Appointed PPC PP People's 31 July 2019[a]
Francisco Aragón Granada 3 151,108 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
José Aranda Zaragoza 1 162,580 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
Javier Arenas Andalusia - Appointed PPA PP People's 7 February 2019[a]
Emilio Argüeso Valencia - Appointed Cs Cs Citizens 27 June 2019[a]
María Arnáiz Burgos 2 64,033 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Rosa Arza Lugo 2 67,701 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
José Asensi Alicante 1 244,327 PSPV PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Miguel Aubà Tarragona 1 120,622 Independent ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
Cristina Ayala Burgos 2 67,742 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019 Fourth Secretary.
Sara Bailac Lleida 1 78,411 ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
José Barreiro Lugo 1 69,692 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
José Barrios Zamora 2 35,571 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Mercedes Berenguer Valencia 2 382,882 PSPV PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Francisco Bernabé Murcia 3 196,810 PPRM PP People's 10 November 2019
Idurre Bideguren Basque Country - Appointed EH Bildu ERC–EHB[b] 31 April 2019[a]
Jokin Bildarratz Basque Country - Appointed EAJ-PNV Basque 15 December 2016[a]
Francisco Blanco Asturias 1 189,325 FSA PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Manuel Blasco Teruel 1 20,925 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
José Bolaños Ciudad Real 3 87,886 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Cosme Bonet Mallorca 1 91,522 PSIB PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Josefina Bueno Valencia - Appointed PSPV PSOE Socialists 27 June 2019[a]
Marisa Bustinduy Andalusia - Appointed PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 7 February 2019[a]
Miquel Caminal Lleida 2 71,084 ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
Ana Camins Madrid - Appointed PPCM PP People's 11 July 2019[a]
Francisco Cañizares Ciudad Real 1 90,261 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019
María Cantalapiedra Valladolid 1 114,823 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Esther Carmona El Hierro 1 2,025 PSC PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Jesús Caro Ávila 1 23,773 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Fran Carrillo Andalusia - Appointed Cs Cs Citizens 7 February 2019[a]
Verónica Casal A Coruña 3 181,281 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
Laura Castel Tarragona 2 113,512 Independent ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
Santiago Castellà Tarragona 1 71,199 PSC PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Xavier Castellana Lleida 3 66,067 ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
María Castro Cádiz 1 187,722 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Alberto Catalán Navarre 3 101,945 UPN NA+ Mixed 10 November 2019
José Cepeda Madrid - Appointed PSOE-M PSOE Socialists 11 July 2019[a]
Josep Cervera Girona 2 94,236 PDeCAT JxCat Nationalists[c] 10 November 2019
Fabián Chinea La Gomera 1 3,628 ASG Mixed 10 November 2019
Fernando Clavijo Canaries - Appointed CCa CCaPNC Nationalists[c] 31 July 2019[a]
Josep Cleries Catalonia - Appointed PDeCAT JxCat Nationalists[c] 4 May 2018[a]
Mirella Cortès Barcelona 1 842,875 ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
Antonio Cosculluela Huesca 1 38,650 PSA PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Manuel Cruz Barcelona 1 633,890 PSC PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Miguel Dalmau Zaragoza 1 160,893 PSA PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Bienvenido de Arriba Salamanca 1 80,381 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Manel de la Vega Catalonia - Appointed PSC PSOE Socialists 27 November 2019
Félix de las Cuevas Cantabria 3 87,274 PPC PP People's 10 November 2019
Esther del Brío Salamanca 3 69,663 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
María Delgado Soria 2 15,175 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Olivia Delgado Tenerife 1 119,557 PSC PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Javier de Lucas Valencia 1 392,987 Independent PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María de Pablo La Rioja 1 58,009 PSR PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Fernando de Rosa Valencia 1 392,210 PPCV PP People's 10 November 2019
Francisco Díaz Castile and León - Appointed PSCyL PSOE Socialists 24 July 2019[a]
Raúl Díaz La Rioja - Appointed PSR PSOE Socialists 23 July 2019[a]
Elena Diego Salamanca 1 57,000 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Ana Edo Castellón 2 85,841 PSPV PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Joaquín Egea Teruel 1 20,686 TE Mixed 10 November 2019
Gorka Elejabarrieta Gipuzkoa 1 102,759 EH Bildu ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
David Erguido Madrid - Appointed PPCM PP People's 11 July 2019[a]
Adelina Escandell Catalonia - Appointed ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 27 November 2019
Manuel Escarda Valladolid 1 96,378 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Alfonso Escudero Cuenca 2 39,340 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Baldomero Espinosa Badajoz 2 136,687 PSOE-E PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Rafael Esteban Guadalajara 1 42,048 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Etxano Biscay 2 222,904 EAJ-PNV Basque 10 November 2019
Alberto Fabra Valencia - Appointed PPCV PP People's 27 June 2019[a]
Francisco Fajardo Lanzarote 1 15,400 PSC PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019 First Secretary.
Francisco Fernández Ourense 3 64,233 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
Jesús Fernández Castilla-La Mancha - Appointed PSCM PSOE Socialists 23 July 2019[a]
José Fernández Zamora 1 32,683 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
José Miguel Fernández Cantabria - Appointed PRC Mixed 11 July 2019[a]
Manuel Fernández Jaén 3 133,728 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Fernández Asturias 2 186,063 FSA PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Fernández Palencia 3 34,261 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Mercedes Fernández Asturias 1 156,799 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
María Fernández Cantabria 1 83,561 PSC PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Teresa Fernández Castilla-La Mancha - Appointed PSCM PSOE Socialists 23 July 2019[a]
Xoaquín Fernández Galicia - Appointed PSdeG PSOE Socialists 20 November 2019
Antonio Ferrer Madrid 2 962,347 PSOE-M PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Carlos Floriano Cáceres 1 70,218 PPE PP People's 10 November 2019
Francisco Fragoso Badajoz 1 110,538 PPE PP People's 10 November 2019
Juan Francisco Ourense 1 53,572 PSdeG PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Sara Galván Valladolid 2 94,597 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María García Granada 2 157,071 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Pío García-Escudero Madrid 1 1,226,205 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019 Second Vice-President.
Javier Garcinuño Cáceres 3 79,738 PSOE-E PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Garmendia Gipuzkoa 2 117,205 EAJ-PNV Basque 10 November 2019
Andrés Gil Burgos 1 65,138 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Juan Gilabert Seville 3 348,890 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Godoy Badajoz 3 136,389 PSOE-E PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Ruth Goñi Navarre 1 102,988 Cs NA+ Citizens 10 November 2019
Ana González La Rioja 1 61,779 PPR PP People's 10 November 2019
Jesús González Huelva 3 85,727 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
José González Guadalajara 2 40,310 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019
Josefa González Huelva 2 88,887 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Pilar González Andalusia - Appointed AA Left[d] 28 November 2019
Sebastián González Ávila 2 34,635 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Jacobo González-Robatto Andalusia - Appointed Vox Mixed 19 December 2019
José Gregorio Toledo 1 126,803 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019
Javier Guerra Pontevedra 1 158,755 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
Antonio Gutiérrez Seville 1 374,741 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Heredia Soria 1 16,299 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Miguel Heredia Málaga 1 227,084 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Hernández Seville 2 364,752 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Paloma Hernández Fuerteventura 1 9,336 PSC PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Rafael Hernando Almería 1 102,428 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019 Third Secretary.
Mar Hormigo Andalusia - Appointed Cs Cs Citizens 7 February 2019[a]
Amaro Huelva Huelva 1 91,662 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Juan Imbroda Melilla 1 10,163 PP PP People's 10 November 2019
Juan Juncal A Coruña 2 188,448 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
Francisco Lacalle Burgos 1 67,878 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Imanol Landa Biscay 3 220,156 EAJ-PNV Basque 10 November 2019 Second Secretary.
José Ignacio Landaluce Cádiz 1 154,115 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
Amaya Landín Cantabria 2 97,872 PPC PP People's 10 November 2019
Fernando Lastra Asturias 3 180,622 FSA PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
José Latorre Jaén 2 135,192 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Rafael Lemus Extremadura - Appointed PSOE-E PSOE Socialists 19 July 2019[a]
Joan Lerma Valencia - Appointed PSPV PSOE Socialists 27 June 2019[a]
Carmen Leyte Ourense 2 66,682 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
Julia Liberal Álava 1 37,204 PSE-EE PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Pilar Llop Madrid - Appointed PSOE-M PSOE Socialists 11 July 2019[a] President.
Fernando López Andalusia - Appointed PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 12 September 2019[a]
Jordi López Menorca 1 10,406 PPIB PP People's 10 November 2019
María Teresa López Castile and León - Appointed PSCyL PSOE Socialists 24 July 2019[a]
Miguel Lorenzo A Coruña 1 197,532 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
María Luna Córdoba 1 147,838 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Macías Badajoz 1 141,687 PSOE-E PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Antonio Magdalena Navarre 1 82,809 PSN PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Tomás Marcos Madrid - Appointed Cs Cs Citizens 11 July 2019[a]
José Vicente Marí Balearics - Appointed PPIB PP People's 12 July 2019[a]
José Marín Murcia 1 182,638 Vox Mixed 10 November 2019
Javier Maroto Castile and León - Appointed PPCyL PP People's 24 July 2019[a]
Francisco Márquez Jaén 1 140,337 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
Jordi Martí Girona 1 116,664 ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
Beatriz Martín Teruel 2 19,060 TE Mixed 10 November 2019
Estefanía Martín Málaga 2 220,436 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Jesús Martín Ciudad Real 1 92,472 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Juan Martín Ávila 1 37,865 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
María Martín Zamora 3 33,423 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Ana Martínez Alicante 2 238,631 PSPV PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Fernando Martínez Almería 1 87,519 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Gerardo Martínez Soria 2 16,060 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Jorge Martínez Palencia 2 37,375 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
María Martínez Cuenca 2 40,732 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019
Vicente Martínez Castellón 2 83,915 PPCV PP People's 10 November 2019
Fernando Martínez-Maíllo Zamora 1 36,025 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Koldo Martínez Navarre - Appointed Zabaltzen GB Left[d] 27 September 2019[a]
Robert Masih Barcelona 3 620,703 ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
Jami Matamala Girona 1 110,351 PDeCAT JxCat Nationalists[c] 10 November 2019
Rodrigo Mediavilla Palencia 1 38,609 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Juan Medina Álava 2 41,447 EAJ-PNV Basque 10 November 2019
Pedro Meneses Tenerife 2 112,327 PSC PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Carmen Mínguez Ciudad Real 2 90,374 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Manuel Miranda Albacete 1 69,892 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
César Mogo Lugo 1 55,284 PSdeG PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Susanna Moll Mallorca 2 87,196 PSIB PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
José Antonio Monago Extremadura - Appointed PPE PP People's 19 July 2019[a]
Pedro Montalvo La Rioja 2 55,876 PSR PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Ramón Morales Gran Canaria 1 117,441 PSC PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Morán León 2 86,327 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
María Moreno Cáceres 2 82,280 PSOE-E PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Rubén Moreno Valencia 2 369,835 PPCV PP People's 10 November 2019
Alfonso Moscoso Cádiz 2 174,324 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Carles Mulet Valencia - Appointed IdPV Compromís Left[d] 27 June 2019[a]
Alfonso Muñoz Córdoba 2 140,768 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Ángeles Muñoz Málaga 1 218,244 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
David Muñoz Ceuta 1 10,071 PP PP People's 10 November 2019
Elena Muñoz Galicia - Appointed PPdeG PP People's 20 November 2019
Montserrat Muro Toledo 2 115,444 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Miguel Nacarino Cáceres 1 83,271 PSOE-E PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Cristina Narbona Madrid 1 1,058,583 PSOE-M PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019 First Vice-President.
Micaela Navarro Jaén 1 140,844 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Txema Oleaga Biscay 1 120,371 PSE-EE PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Félix Ortega Toledo 1 117,567 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Almuden Otaola Álava 1 44,409 EAJ-PNV Basque 10 November 2019
María Otero Asturias - Appointed FSA PSOE Socialists 28 November 2019
Gonzalo Palacín Huesca 3 35,791 PSA PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Marta Pascal Catalonia - Appointed PDeCAT JxCat Nationalists[c] 4 May 2018[a]
María Adelaida Pedrosa Alicante 2 247,328 PPCV PP People's 10 November 2019
Rosa Peral Álava 3 40,414 EAJ-PNV Basque 10 November 2019
Borja Pérez La Palma 1 12,735 PPC PP People's 10 November 2019
Elisenda Pérez Girona 2 104,529 ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
Pablo Pérez Segovia 2 32,245 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Bernat Picornell Catalonia - Appointed ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 4 May 2018[a]
Inés Plaza Almería 2 85,827 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Luis Plaza Valladolid 2 108,906 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
María Carmen Isabel Pobo Teruel 2 19,820 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
Modesto Pose Pontevedra 1 164,705 PSdeG PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Salomé Pradas Castellón 1 88,350 PPCV PP People's 10 November 2019
Fernando Priego Córdoba 1 130,900 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
Javier Puente Cantabria 1 102,966 PPC PP People's 10 November 2019
Artemi Rallo Castellón 1 87,092 PSPV PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Pedro Ramos Canaries - Appointed PSC PSOE Socialists 31 July 2019[a]
Sergio Ramos Gran Canaria 1 97,298 PPC PP People's 10 November 2019
Lourdes Retuerto Murcia - Appointed PSRM PSOE Socialists 20 July 2019[a]
Mayte Rivero Lleida 1 53,691 PDeCAT JxCat Nationalists[c] 10 November 2019
Gonzalo Robles Salamanca 2 76,978 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
José Robles Granada 1 139,361 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
Patricia Rodríguez Ávila 3 33,419 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Ramón Rodríguez Albacete 2 70,869 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019
Tontxu Rodríguez Basque Country - Appointed PSE-EE PSOE Socialists 15 December 2016[a]
Luis Rodríguez-Comendador Almería 2 98,213 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
Pilar Rojo Pontevedra 2 154,434 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
Donelia Roldán Albacete 2 67,625 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Lorena Roldán Catalonia - Appointed Cs Cs Citizens 4 May 2018[a]
Pedro Rollán Madrid 2 1,153,526 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019
Antonio Román Guadalajara 1 43,281 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019
Juan Ros Ceuta 1 11,284 Vox Mixed 10 November 2019
Eduardo Rubiño Madrid - Appointed MM Left[d] 11 July 2019[a]
Luisa Rudi Aragon - Appointed PPA PP People's 6 September 2019[a]
Josep Rufà Tarragona 3 104,835 ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
Víctor Ruiz Zaragoza 3 151,378 PSA PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Teresa Ruiz-Sillero Andalusia - Appointed PPA PP People's 7 February 2019[a]
Pablo Ruz Alicante 1 262,256 PPCV PP People's 10 November 2019
Amelia Salanueva Navarre 2 104,424 PPN NA+ People's 10 November 2019
María Salom Mallorca 1 93,266 PPIB PP People's 10 November 2019
José Sánchez Huelva 2 54,564 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
Miguel Sánchez Murcia - Appointed Cs Cs Citizens 20 July 2019[a]
Clemente Sánchez-Garnica Aragon - Appointed PAR Mixed 6 September 2019[a]
Saturnina Santana Gran Canaria 2 111,576 PSC PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Carlota Santiago Madrid - Appointed Cs Cs Citizens 11 July 2019[a]
Javier Santiago León 2 85,666 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
José Luis Sanz Seville 1 256,950 PPA PP People's 10 November 2019
Juan Sanz Segovia 3 27,943 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Paloma Sanz Segovia 1 33,340 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Antonio Serrano Albacete 1 74,357 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019
María Serrano Córdoba 3 140,252 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Riansares Serrano Guadalajara 2 40,295 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Rosa Serrano Huesca 2 36,686 PSA PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Antonio Silván León 1 85,627 PPCyL PP People's 10 November 2019
Ana María Surra Barcelona 2 711,195 ERC ERC–Sob ERC–EHB[b] 10 November 2019
Violante Tomás Murcia 1 247,098 PPRM PP People's 10 November 2019
Carmen Torralba Cuenca 1 40,372 PSCM PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
José Tortosa Cuenca 1 41,754 PPCM PP People's 10 November 2019
Luke Uribe-Etxebarria Gipuzkoa 3 115,120 EAJ-PNV Basque 10 November 2019
María Vaquero Gipuzkoa 1 120,481 EAJ-PNV Basque 10 November 2019
Manuel Varela Lugo 3 65,672 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
Antonio Vázquez A Coruña 1 185,015 PSdeG PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Jesús Vázquez Galicia - Appointed PPdeG PP People's 20 November 2019
Juan Vázquez Murcia 2 235,078 PPRM PP People's 10 November 2019
Miguel Vázquez Andalusia - Appointed PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 7 February 2019[a]
Cándida Verdier Cádiz 3 171,797 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Salvador Vidal León 1 88,069 PSCyL PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Vicenç Vidal Balearics - Appointed PSM Més Left[d] 12 July 2019[a]
Sara Vilà Catalonia - Appointed ICV UP Left[d] 4 May 2018[a]
Ana Villar Zaragoza 2 157,873 PSA PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019
Miguel Viso Ourense 1 68,349 PPdeG PP People's 10 November 2019
Carlos Yécora La Rioja 2 59,582 PPR PP People's 10 November 2019
Alejandro Zubeldia Granada 1 160,596 PSOE-A PSOE Socialists 10 November 2019

See also

Notes

References

  • "Otras Disposiciones: Junta Electoral Provinciales – Elecciones generales. Proclamación de candidaturas" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). No. 248. Madrid, Spain: Government of Spain. 15 October 2019. pp. 113461–113748. ISSN 0212-033X. Retrieved 15 October 2019.
  • "Otras Disposiciones: Junta Electoral Central – Elecciones generales. Resultados" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). No. 289. Madrid, Spain: Government of Spain. 2 December 2019. pp. 132125–132133. ISSN 0212-033X. Retrieved 2 December 2019.
  1. ^ Ruiz Alonso, Germán (3 December 2019). "Pilar Llop, presidenta del Senado por mayoría simple". El País (in Spanish). Madrid, Spain. Retrieved 21 December 2019.
  2. ^ "La socialista Pilar Llop, elegida presidenta del Senado". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). Barcelona, Spain. EFE. 3 December 2019. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  3. ^ "Quién es quién en la Mesa del Congreso y del Senado". El País (in Spanish). Madrid, Spain. 3 December 2019. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  4. ^ Fernández, Juan José (3 December 2019). "La jueza Pilar Llop, nueva presidenta del Senado". El Periódico de Catalunya (in Spanish). Barcelona, Spain. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  5. ^ a b c "Junta Preparatoria y Sesión Constitutiva" (PDF). Diario de Sesiones del Senado - Pleno (in Spanish). Vol. XIV no. 1. Madrid, Spain: Cortes Generales. 3 December 2019. pp. 11–14. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  6. ^ Cervilla, Paloma (3 December 2019). "Pilar Llop, presidenta del Senado, coloca a la violencia de género en el centro de su mandato". ABC. Madrid, Spain. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  7. ^ "Narbona y García-Escudero siguen en la Mesa del Senado, con el PNV de árbitro". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). Barcelona, Spain. EFE. 3 December 2019. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  8. ^ "Fajardo (PSOE), Landa (PNV), Hernando (PP) y Ayala (PP) completan la Mesa del Senado". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). Barcelona, Spain. Europa Press. 3 December 2019. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
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