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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The 1120s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1120, and ended on December 31, 1129.

Events

1120

By place

Byzantine Empire
Levant
Europe
England
Asia

By topic

Astronomy
Religion

1121

By place

Byzantine Empire
Levant
  • Summer – Seljuk forces under Toghtekin make extensive raids into Galilee. King Baldwin II, in reprisal, crosses with a Crusader army the Jordan River and ravages the countryside. He occupies and destroys a fortress that Toghtekin has build at Jerash.[7]
Europe
England
Eurasia
Asia

By topic

Religion

1122

By place

Byzantine Empire
Levant
Europe
Eurasia

By topic

Religion

1123

By place

Levant
  • April 18 – King Baldwin II of Jerusalem is captured by Turkish forces under Belek Ghazi – while preparing to practice falconry near Gargar on the Euphrates. Most of the Crusader army is massacred, and Baldwin is taken to the castle at Kharput. To save the situation the Venetians are asked to help. Doge Domenico Michiel lifts the siege of Corfu (see 1122) and takes his fleet to Acre, arriving at the port in the end of May.[17]
  • May – Baldwin II and Joscelin I are rescued by 50 Armenian soldiers (disguised as monks and merchants) at Kharput. They kill the guards and infiltrate the castle where the prisoners are kept. Joscelin escapes to seek help. However, the castle is soon besieged by Turkish forces under Belek Ghazi – and is after some time recaptured. Baldwin and Waleran of Le Puiset are moved for greater safety to the castle of Harran.[18]
  • May 29Battle of Yibneh: A Crusader army led by Eustace Grenier defeats the Fatimid forces (16,000 men) near Ibelin. Despite the numerical superiority, Vizier Al-Ma'mun al-Bata'ihi is forced to withdraw to Egypt while his camp is plundered by the Crusaders. Eustace returns to Jerusalem in triumph, but later dies on June 15.[19]
  • May 30 – The Venetian fleet arrives at Ascalon and instantly set about attacking the Fatimid fleet. The Egyptians fall into a trap, caught between two Venetian squadrons, and are destroyed or captured. While sailing back to Acre, the Venetians capture a merchant-fleet of ten richly laden vessels.[20]
  • The Pactum Warmundi: A treaty of alliance, is established between the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Republic of Venice at Acre. The Venetians receive a street, with a church, baths and a bakery, free of all obligations, in every town of the kingdom. They are also excused of all toll and taxes.[21]
Europe
England
Africa
Asia

By topic

Religion

1124

By place

Europe
North America
Middle East

1125

By place

Levant
Europe
England
Asia

By topic

Arts
  • Albert of Aix, German historian and writer, begins his Historia Hierosolymitanae expeditionis (approximate date).
Education
Religion

1126

By place

Byzantine Empire
  • Summer – Emperor John II (Komnenos) re-confirms the treaty of 1082. This ends the hostilities with Hungary and Venice. John secures Braničevo and recovers the region of Sirmium on the Danube. But is forced by Venice to renew the exclusive commercial privileges.
Levant
Europe
England
Asia
  • Spring – In China, scholars and farmers demonstrate around the capital city of Kaifeng, for the restoration of a trusted military official, Li Gang (李綱). Small conflicts erupt between the protestors and the government.
  • January 18 – Emperor Hui Zong of the Song Dynasty abdicates in favour of his eldest son, Qin Zong after a 24-year reign. Hui Zong assumes the honorary title of Taishang Huang (or "Retired Emperor").
  • Jin–Song War: Jurchen forces reach the Yellow River Valley, two days after New Year. Remnants of the court flee south, including much of the populace, and communities such as the Kaifeng Jews.[57]
  • January 31 – Jurchen forces lay siege to Kaifeng. Qin Zong negotiates the terms of surrender, agreeing an annual indemnity. He orders Song forces to defend the prefectures of the Northern Song.

By topic

Literature
Religion

1127

By place

Europe
England
Levant
Asia

By topic

Religion

1128

By place

Byzantine Empire
Europe
England
Levant
Asia

By topic

Religion

1129

By place

Europe
Asia

By topic

Religion

Significant people

Births

Deaths

References

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