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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The 1050s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1050, and ended on December 31, 1059.

Events

1050

By place

Europe
Africa

By topic

Religion

1051

By place

Europe
England
  • Eustace II, count of Boulogne, visits England and is receive with honour at the court by King Edward the Confessor. In Dover a fight breaks out between the Norman visitors and the locals, resulting in the deaths of several people. Edward blames the people of Dover and orders Godwin, earl of Wessex, to deal with them. Godwin refuses to obey Edward's order, and in response Edward raises an army and forces the Godwin family into exile.
  • Edward the Confessor invites William of Normandy to England. It is at this point that it is thought that Edward promises the English throne to William in the event of his death.
  • Heregeld is abolished by Edward the Confessor. It has been collected for many years to provide funds for defending the country from Viking raiders.

By topic

Religion

1052

By place

England
Africa

By topic

Religion

1053

By place

Byzantine Empire
  • End of the Pecheneg Revolt: Emperor Constantine IX (Monomachos) makes peace with the Pechenegs. However, Pecheneg raids do not cease; they not only damage the economy by plundering, but Constantine also is forced to buy protection or peace from them by gifts, land grants, privileges and titles.[20]
Europe
England

By topic

Religion

1054

By place

Byzantine Empire
  • Sultan Tughril leads a large Seljuk army out of Azerbaijan into Armenia, possibly to consolidate his frontier, while providing an incentive to his Turkoman allies in the form of plunder. Tughril divides his army into four columns, ordering three to veer off to the north to raid into central and northern Armenia, while he takes the fourth column towards Lake Van. The Seljuk Turks capture and sack the fortress city of Artchesh, after an 8-day siege.[21]
Europe
England
Africa
Asia

By topic

Astronomy
Religion

1055

By place

Byzantine Empire
Europe
England
Arabian Empire

By topic

Art
  • Construction on the Liaodi Pagoda in Hebei is completed (the tallest pagoda in Chinese history, standing at a height of 84 m (275 ft) tall).
Religion

1056

By place

Byzantine Empire
Europe
England
Northern Africa

Battle of Tabfarilla in present day Mauritania: The Almoravids are crushed by the Godala and their Emir Yahya ibn Umar al-Lamtuni falls.

By topic

Religion

1057

By place

Byzantine Empire
Europe
Africa
Asia

By topic

Religion

1058

By place

Europe
Africa

By topic

Religion

1059

By place

Byzantine Empire
Europe
Seljuk Empire

By topic

Religion

Significant people

Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ Derry, T. K. (2000) [1979]. History of Scandinavia: Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland. Minneapolis, MN and London: University of Minnesota Press. p. 22. ISBN 9780816637997.
  2. ^ Hubbard, Ben (2016). Viking Warriors. New York: Cavendish Square Publishing, LLC. p. 80. ISBN 9781502624550.
  3. ^ Publishing, Britannica Educational (2014). Denmark, Finland, and Sweden. The Britannica Guide to Countries of the European Union. New York: Britanncia Educational Publishing. p. 177. ISBN 9781615309955.
  4. ^ "Sweden Time Line Chronological Timetable of Events - Worldatlas.com". www.worldatlas.com. Retrieved 2019-08-23.
  5. ^ Gregorovius, Ferdinand (2010). History of the City of Rome in the Middle Ages. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 78. ISBN 9781108015035.
  6. ^ Klieforth, Alexander Leslie; Munro, Robert John (2004). The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights: A History of Liberty and Freedom from the Ancient Celts to the New Millennium. Dallas, Lanham, Boulder, New York and Oxford: University Press of America. p. 114. ISBN 9780761827917.
  7. ^ Huscroft, Richard (2013) [2009]. The Norman Conquest: A New Introduction. London and New York: Routledge. p. 64. ISBN 9781317866275.
  8. ^ Rough Guides (2008). The Rough Guide to West Africa (Fifth ed.). London, New York and New Delhi: Rough Guides UK. ISBN 9781405380683.
  9. ^ Moniot, Henri (December 1970). "Fouilles à Tegdaoust". Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales. 25 (6): 1740–1741. doi:10.1017/S0395264900159311. ISSN 0395-2649.
  10. ^ Mauny, R. A. (1954). "The Question of Ghana". Africa: Journal of the International African Institute. 24 (3): 200–213. doi:10.2307/1156424. ISSN 0001-9720. JSTOR 1156424.
  11. ^ Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
  12. ^ Insley, Charles (2011). "Remembering Communities Past: Exeter Cathedral in the Eleventh Century". In Dalton, Paul; Insley, Charles; Wilkinson, Louise J. (eds.). Cathedrals, Communities and Conflict in the Anglo-Norman World. Woodbridge, England: Boydell Press. p. 48. ISBN 9781843836209.
  13. ^ Iversen, Gunilla (2000). "Transforming a Viking into a Saint: The Divine Office of St. Olav". In Fassler, Margot E.; Baltzer, Rebecca A. (eds.). The Divine Office in the Latin Middle Ages: Methodology and Source Studies, Regional Developments, Hagiography. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. p. 406. ISBN 9780195352382.
  14. ^ Clayton, Mary (2003). The Cult of the Virgin Mary in Anglo-Saxon England. Cambridge, New York, Port Chester, Melbourne and Sydney: Cambridge University Press. p. 45. ISBN 9780521531153.
  15. ^ Evans, Jeff (2011). Oliver, Garrett (ed.). The Oxford Companion to Beer. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. p. 831. ISBN 9780199912100.
  16. ^ Wells, Mike (2016-12-14). "Dark beer and dumplings in Bavaria: a visit to the world's oldest monastic brewery". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2019-08-23.
  17. ^ Eames, Andrew (16 September 2016). "Move Over Oktoberfest: an Alternative Beer Pilgrimage in Bavaria". The Independent. Retrieved 23 August 2019.
  18. ^ Jim Bradbury, The Capetians: The History of a Dynasty, pp. 106–108.
  19. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010) L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 53.
  20. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 210. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  21. ^ Brian Todd Carey (2012). Road to Manzikert: Byzantine and Islamic Warfare (527–1071), p. 125. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1.
  22. ^ Levtzion, Nehemia; Hopkins, John F.P., eds. (2000), Corpus of Early Arabic Sources for West Africa, New York: Marcus Weiner Press. ISBN 1-55876-241-8. First published in 1981.
  23. ^ Journal of Astronomy, part 9, chapter 56 of Sung History (Sung Shih) first printing, 1340. facsimile on the frontispiece of Misner, Thorne, Wheeler Gravitation, 1973.
  24. ^ "Crab Nebula". NASA.
  25. ^ Brett Edward Whalen (2009). Dominion of God: Christendom and Apocalypse in the Middle Ages, p. 24 (Harvard University Press).
  26. ^ Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 109. ISBN 2-7068-1398-9.
  27. ^ MacLean, Mark (1999). "History of Ireleth and Askam-in-Furness". Bruderlin MacLean Publishing Services. Archived from the original on March 5, 2017. Retrieved March 30, 2016.
  28. ^ John Julius Norwich (1991). Byzantium: The Apogee – Michael the Aged, p. 327. ISBN 0-394-53779-3.
  29. ^ Jonathan Riley-Smith (2004). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume IV – Part II (c. 1024–c. 1198), p. 50. ISBN 978-0-521-41411-1.
  30. ^ Fryde, E.B.; Greenway, D.E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology, p. 217. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
  31. ^ John Julius Norwich (1991). Byzantium: The Apogee – Isaac Komnenos on the March, p. 329. ISBN 0-394-53779-3.
  32. ^ Douglas, David C. (1964). William the Conqueror: The Norman Impact Upon England, pp. 72–73. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
  33. ^ Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle). L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 109. ISBN 2-7068-1398-9.
  34. ^ Panton, James (2011). Historical Dictionary of the British Monarchy. Scarecrow Press. p. 16. ISBN 9780810874978.
  35. ^ "Bolesław II - king of Poland". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 7 April 2018.
  36. ^ John Julius Norwich (1991). Byzantium: The Apogee – The choice of a Successor, p. 336. ISBN 0-394-53779-3.
  37. ^ John V.A. Fine Jr (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 279. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  38. ^ The Normans in Europe, Ed. & Trans. Elisabeth van Houts (Manchester & New York: Manchester University Press, 2000), pp. 236–37.
  39. ^ Brian Todd Carey (2012). Road to Manzikert: Byzantine and Islamic Warfare (527–1071), p. 127. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1.
This page was last edited on 10 January 2019, at 02:04
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