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101st Infantry Battalion

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

101st Infantry Battalion
ActiveJuly 1942 – June 16, 1943
AllegianceUnited States of America
BranchUnited States Army
TypeSeparate infantry battalion
DecorationsNone
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Lt. Col Edward Conrad

The 101st Infantry Battalion (Separate) was an independent battalion on the US Army designed to be formed of Austrian-Americans and Austrian Nationals resident in the United States.[1]

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Transcription

History

In 1942 the United States created several separate infantry battalions composed of Americans of ethnic descent or citizens of certain nations who were not yet American citizens. Amongst them were the 99th Infantry Battalion of Norwegian-Americans, the 100th Infantry Battalion of Japanese-Americans, and the 122nd Infantry Battalion of Greek-Americans.[2] A Polish unit was also proposed but never created.[3]

Zita of Bourbon-Parma, the wife of the last Emperor of Austria supposedly lobbied the American government for such a unit following President Franklin D. Roosevelt's officially declared restoration of an independent Austria to be an American war aim. Three of her sons Carl, Charles, Rudolf and Felix von Habsburg served in the unit that served at Camp Atterbury, Indiana.[4]Werner von Trapp also served in the Battalion.[5]

The battalion was disbanded on June 16, 1943.

Notes

  1. ^ p.156 Brook-Shepherd, Gordon Uncrowned Emperor: The Life and Times of Otto von Habsburg Continuum International Publishing Group, 30/12/2003
  2. ^ p.14 Stanton, Shelby L. Order of Battle, U.S. Army, World War II Presidio, 1984
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-10-03. Retrieved 2012-01-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ http://www.avalanchepress.com/Austrian101st.php
  5. ^ Camp Atterbury - Camp Crier May 14, 1943

External links

This page was last edited on 1 July 2020, at 00:49
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