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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

← 9999  10000 10001 →
Cardinalten thousand
Ordinal10000th
(ten thousandth)
Numeral systemdecamillesimal
Factorization24× 54
Greek numeral
Roman numeralX
Unicode symbol(s)X, ↂ
Greek prefixmyria-
Latin prefixdecamilli-
Binary100111000100002
Ternary1112011013
Quaternary21301004
Quinary3100005
Senary1141446
Octal234208
Duodecimal595412
Hexadecimal271016
Vigesimal150020
Base 367PS36

10,000 (ten thousand) is the natural number following 9,999 and preceding 10,001.

Name

Many languages have a specific word for this number: in Ancient Greek it is μύριοι (the etymological root of the word myriad in English), in Aramaic ܪܒܘܬܐ, in Hebrew רבבה [revava], in Chinese 萬/万 (Mandarin wàn, Cantonese maan6, Hokkien bān), in Japanese 万/萬 [man], in Khmer ម៉ឺន [meun], in Korean 만/萬 [man], in Russian тьма [t'ma], in Vietnamese vạn, in Thai หมื่น [meun], and in Malayalam പതിനായിരം [patinayiram]. It is often used to mean an indefinite very large number.[1]

The Greek root was used in early versions of the metric system in the form of the decimal prefix myria-.

The number 10000 can also be written 10,000 (UK and US), 10.000 (Europe mainland), 10 000 (transition metric), or 10•000 (with the dot raised to the middle of the zeroes; metric).

In mathematics

In science

In time

In other fields

Selected numbers in the range 10001–19999

10001 to 10999

11000 to 11999

  • 11025 – sum of the cubes of the first 14 positive integers
  • 11083 – palindromic prime in 2 consecutive bases: 23 (KLK23) and 24 (J5J24)
  • 11111 – repdigit
  • 11311 – palindromic prime
  • 11340 – Harshad number in bases 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15 and 16
  • 11377 – Smarandache reverse power summation number
  • 11353star prime[14]
  • 11368 – pentagonal pyramidal number[10]
  • 11410weird number[17]
  • 11411 – palindromic prime in base 10
  • 11424 – Harshad number in bases 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15 and 16
  • 11440 – square pyramidal number[15]
  • 11480 – tetrahedral number[20]
  • 11605 – smallest integer to start a run of five consecutive integers with the same number of divisors
  • 11690 – weird number[17]
  • 11719 – cuban prime,[13] twin prime with 11717
  • 11726 – octahedral number[16]
  • 11826 – smallest number whose square (algebra) is pandigital but lacks zeros.
  • 11953 – palindromic prime in bases 7 (465647) and 30 (D8D30)

12000 to 12999

  • 12000 - 12,000 of each of the twelve tribes of Israel made up the 144,000 servants of God who were 'sealed' according to the Book of Revelation in the New Testament [25]
  • 12097 – cuban prime[13]
  • 12110 – weird number[17]
  • 12167 – 233
  • 12198semi-meandric number[26]
  • 12285 – amicable number with 14595
  • 12287Thabit number
  • 12321 – palindromic square
  • 12341 – tetrahedral number[20]
  • 12407 - cited on QI as the smallest uninteresting positive integer in terms of arithmetical mathematics.[notes 1][27]
  • 12421 – palindromic prime
  • 12529 – square pyramidal number[15]
  • 12530weird number[17]
  • 12670 – weird number[17]
  • 12721 – palindromic prime
  • 12726Ruth–Aaron pair
  • 12758 – largest number that cannot be expressed as the sum of distinct cubes
  • 12765 – Finnish internet meme; the code accompanying no-prize caps in a Coca-Cola bottle top prize contest. Often spelled out yksikaksiseitsemänkuusiviisi, ei voittoa, "one – two – seven – six – five, no prize").
  • 12769 – 1132, palindromic in base 3
  • 12821 – palindromic prime

13000 to 13999

14000 to 14999

  • 14190 – tetrahedral number[20]
  • 14200 – number of n-Queens Problem solutions for n – 12
  • 14341 – palindromic prime
  • 14400 – sum of the cubes of the first 15 positive integers
  • 14641 – 114, palindromic square (base 10)
  • 14644 – octahedral number[16]
  • 14701Markov number[24]
  • 14741 – palindromic prime
  • 14770weird number[17]
  • 14595 – amicable number with 12285
  • 14884 – 1222, palindromic square in base 11
  • 14910 – square pyramidal number[15]

15000 to 15999

16000 to 16999

17000 to 17999

  • 17163 – the largest number that is not the sum of the squares of distinct primes
  • 17272 – weird number[17]
  • 17296 – amicable number with 18416[38]
  • 17344Kaprekar number[39]
  • 17471 – palindromic prime
  • 17570 – weird number[17]
  • 17575 – square pyramidal number[15]
  • 17576 – 263, palindromic in base 5
  • 17689 – 1332, palindromic in base 11
  • 17711 – Fibonacci number[23]
  • 17971 – palindromic prime
  • 17990weird number[17]
  • 17991 – Padovan number[12]

18000 to 18999

  • 18010 – octahedral number[16]
  • 18181 – palindromic prime, strobogrammatic prime[32]
  • 18410 – weird number[17]
  • 18416 – amicable number with 17296[40]
  • 18481 – palindromic prime
  • 18496 – sum of the cubes of the first 16 positive integers
  • 18600harmonic divisor number[41]
  • 18620 – harmonic divisor number[41]
  • 18785 – Leyland number[34]
  • 18830 – weird number[17]
  • 18970 – weird number[17]

19000 to 19999

  • 19019 – square pyramidal number[15]
  • 19390 – weird number[17]
  • 19391 – palindromic prime
  • 19441 – cuban prime[13]
  • 19455 – smallest integer that cannot be expressed as a sum of fewer than 548 ninth powers
  • 19513 – tribonacci number[19]
  • 19531repunit prime in base 5
  • 19600 – 1402, tetrahedral number
  • 19609 – first prime followed by a prime gap of over fifty
  • 19670weird number[17]
  • 19683 – 39
  • 19871 – octahedral number[16]
  • 19891 – palindromic prime
  • 19927 – cuban prime[13]
  • 19991 – palindromic prime

See also

Notes

  1. ^ On the basis that it did not then (November 2011) appear in Sloane's On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences.

References

  1. ^ http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/myriad (Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary)
  2. ^ Climate Timeline Information Tool
  3. ^ http://www.infoworld.com/article/04/07/28/HNnasalinux_1.html news
  4. ^ "NASA Project: Columbia". Archived from the original on 2005-04-08. Retrieved 2005-02-15.
  5. ^ Brewster, David (1830). The Edinburgh Encyclopædia. 12. Edinburgh, UK: William Blackwood, John Waugh, John Murray, Baldwin & Cradock, J. M. Richardson. p. 494. Retrieved 2015-10-09.
  6. ^ Brewster, David (1832). The Edinburgh Encyclopaedia. 12 (1st American ed.). Joseph and Edward Parker. Retrieved 2015-10-09.
  7. ^ Dingler, Johann Gottfried (1823). Polytechnisches Journal (in German). 11. Stuttgart, Germany: J.W. Gotta'schen Buchhandlung. Retrieved 2015-10-09.
  8. ^ https://www.gutenberg.org/etext/926 : Ten Thousand Dreams Interpreted
  9. ^ a b "Sloane's A002182 : Highly composite numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  10. ^ a b c d e "Sloane's A002411 : Pentagonal pyramidal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  11. ^ "Sloane's A003261 : Woodall numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  12. ^ a b c "Sloane's A000931 : Padovan sequence". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-11.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h "Sloane's A002407 : Cuban primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  14. ^ a b c "Sloane's A083577 : Prime star numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h "Sloane's A000330 : Square pyramidal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g "Sloane's A005900 : Octahedral numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab "Sloane's A006037 : Weird numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  18. ^ a b "Sloane's A002997 : Carmichael numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  19. ^ a b "Sloane's A000073 : Tribonacci numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  20. ^ a b c d e f "Sloane's A000292 : Tetrahedral numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  21. ^ "Sloane's A000078 : Tetranacci numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  22. ^ "Sloane's A001190 : Wedderburn-Etherington numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  23. ^ a b "Sloane's A000045 : Fibonacci numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  24. ^ a b "Sloane's A002559 : Markoff (or Markov) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  25. ^ Relevation 7:4-8
  26. ^ "Sloane's A000682 : Semimeanders". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  27. ^ Host: Stephen Fry; Panellists: Alan Davies, Al Murray, Dara Ó Briain and Sandi Toksvig (11 November 2011). "Inland Revenue". QI. Series I. Episode 10. London, England. 19:55 minutes in. BBC. BBC Two.
  28. ^ "Sloane's A000129 : Pell numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  29. ^ "Sloane's A112643 : Odd and squarefree abundant numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  30. ^ "Sloane's A051015 : Zeisel numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  31. ^ "Sloane's A001006 : Motzkin numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  32. ^ a b "Sloane's A007597 : Strobogrammatic primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  33. ^ "Sloane's A091516 : Primes of the form 4^n - 2^(n+1) - 1". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  34. ^ a b "Sloane's A076980 : Leyland numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  35. ^ "Sloane's A093069 : a(n) = (2^n + 1)^2 - 2". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  36. ^ "Sloane's A000108 : Catalan numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  37. ^ "Sloane's A088164 : Wolstenholme primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  38. ^ Higgins, Peter (2008). Number Story: From Counting to Cryptography. New York: Copernicus. p. 61. ISBN 978-1-84800-000-1.
  39. ^ "Sloane's A006886 : Kaprekar numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  40. ^ Higgins, ibid.
  41. ^ a b "Sloane's A001599 : Harmonic or Ore numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.

External links

This page was last edited on 2 June 2019, at 09:08
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